Forensic medicine, also known as legal medicine or medical jurisprudence, is a branch of medicine that deals with the application of medical knowledge to legal issues and questions. It involves the examination, interpretation, and analysis of medical evidence for use in courts of law. This may include determining the cause and manner of death, identifying injuries or diseases, assessing the effects of substances or treatments, and evaluating the competency or capacity of individuals. Forensic medicine is often used in criminal investigations and court cases, but it can also be applied to civil matters such as personal injury claims or medical malpractice suits.

Infanticide is the act of killing an infant, typically a child under one year of age. In forensic medicine and criminal law, infanticide is often distinguished from homicide in general based on the age of the victim, the mental state of the perpetrator, or other factors.

In some cases, infanticide may be the result of an unplanned or unwanted pregnancy, or it may be related to cultural or societal pressures. In other cases, it may be associated with mental illness or other factors that impair the judgment and decision-making abilities of the perpetrator.

It is important to note that infanticide is a criminal offense in most jurisdictions, and those who are accused of committing this act may face severe legal consequences. At the same time, it is also important to recognize the complex social, cultural, and psychological factors that can contribute to this tragic phenomenon, and to work towards preventing it through education, support, and access to resources for new parents.

In the context of medical terminology, "history" refers to the detailed narrative of the patient's symptoms, illnesses, treatments, and other related information gathered during a medical consultation or examination. This is usually obtained by asking the patient a series of questions about their past medical conditions, current health status, family medical history, lifestyle habits, and any medications they are taking. The information collected in the medical history helps healthcare professionals to diagnose, treat, and manage the patient's health concerns more effectively. It is also an essential part of continuity of care, as it provides valuable insights into the patient's health over time.

I'm happy to help! However, it seems there might be a bit of confusion in your question. "Modern" is a term that refers to a period in time, specifically the modern period which is generally considered to be from the late 19th century to the present. "Literature," on the other hand, is a broad term that refers to written works, especially those considered to have artistic or intellectual value.

So, when you ask for a medical definition of "Literature, Modern," it's not entirely clear what you are looking for. If you are asking for examples of modern literature that deal with medical themes or issues, there are many notable works to choose from, including:

* "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot, which explores the ethical implications of medical research using human cells without consent.
* "The Hot Zone" by Richard Preston, a thriller about the Ebola virus and its potential to cause a global pandemic.
* "Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science" by Atul Gawande, a collection of essays that examine the challenges and uncertainties of medical practice.
* "Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness" by Susannah Cahalan, a memoir about the author's experience with a rare autoimmune disorder that affected her brain.

If you are looking for something else, please let me know and I will do my best to assist you!

Forensic pathology is a subspecialty of pathology that focuses on determining the cause and manner of death by examining a corpse. It involves applying scientific knowledge and techniques to investigate criminal or suspicious deaths, often in conjunction with law enforcement agencies. A forensic pathologist performs autopsies (postmortem examinations) to evaluate internal and external injuries, diseases, and other conditions that may have contributed to the individual's death. They also collect evidence such as tissue samples, which can be used for toxicological, microbiological, or histological analysis. The information gathered by forensic pathologists is crucial in helping to establish the facts surrounding a person's death and assisting legal proceedings.

Forensic anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that applies scientific techniques and methods to analyze human remains for the purpose of establishing identity, determining the cause and manner of death, and investigating incidents of crime, mass disasters, or human rights violations. Forensic anthropologists use their knowledge of osteology, skeletal biology, and archaeological techniques to examine bones, teeth, and other tissues to help law enforcement agencies and legal professionals in criminal and civil investigations. They may also provide expert testimony in court based on their findings.

Homicide is a legal term used to describe the taking of another human life. It is not a medical diagnosis, but rather a legal concept that may result in criminal charges. In medical terms, it might be referred to as "unnatural death" or "violent death." The term itself does not carry a connotation of guilt or innocence; it simply describes the factual occurrence of one person causing the death of another.

The legal definition of homicide varies by jurisdiction and can encompass a range of criminal charges, from manslaughter to murder, depending on the circumstances and intent behind the act.

Drowning is a process resulting in primary respiratory impairment from the direct or indirect immersion/submersion in a liquid medium. It can be classified as:

1. Death due to drowning, which is the wet form where water enters the lungs (drowning with respirations) and
2. Death due to asphyxia from lack of breathing while submerged in water (drowning without respirations).

The terms "wet," "dry," "active," "passive," "silent," or "smothering" drowning have been used historically but are no longer recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or other experts because they can be misleading and do not contribute to the understanding or prevention of drowning.

The process of drowning can lead to various clinical presentations, ranging from mild respiratory symptoms to severe hypoxic injury and ultimately death. Factors such as the duration of submersion, the volume and temperature of the fluid, and the presence of other injuries or medical conditions can all influence the outcome.

It is important to note that drowning is a significant public health issue and a leading cause of accidental deaths worldwide, particularly among children and adolescents. Prevention efforts, such as water safety education, supervision, and barriers around bodies of water, are crucial in reducing the incidence of drowning.

An autopsy, also known as a post-mortem examination or obduction, is a medical procedure in which a qualified professional (usually a pathologist) examines a deceased person's body to determine the cause and manner of death. This process may involve various investigative techniques, such as incisions to study internal organs, tissue sampling, microscopic examination, toxicology testing, and other laboratory analyses. The primary purpose of an autopsy is to gather objective evidence about the medical conditions and factors contributing to the individual's demise, which can be essential for legal, insurance, or public health purposes. Additionally, autopsies can provide valuable insights into disease processes and aid in advancing medical knowledge.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

The "cause of death" is a medical determination of the disease, injury, or event that directly results in a person's death. This information is typically documented on a death certificate and may be used for public health surveillance, research, and legal purposes. The cause of death is usually determined by a physician based on their clinical judgment and any available medical evidence, such as laboratory test results, autopsy findings, or eyewitness accounts. In some cases, the cause of death may be uncertain or unknown, and the death may be classified as "natural," "accidental," "homicide," or "suicide" based on the available information.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a system of medicine that has been developed in China over thousands of years. It is based on the philosophy that the body's vital energy (Qi) circulates through a network of channels called meridians, and that disease results from an imbalance or blockage in this flow of Qi.

TCM uses a variety of treatments to restore balance and promote health, including acupuncture, herbal medicine, moxibustion (the burning of herbs near the skin), cupping, dietary therapy, and tuina (Chinese massage). The use of Chinese herbal medicines is a major component of TCM, with formulas often consisting of combinations of several different herbs tailored to the individual patient's needs.

In addition to these treatments, TCM practitioners may also use diagnostic techniques such as pulse diagnosis and tongue examination to assess a person's overall health and determine the underlying cause of their symptoms. The goal of TCM is not only to treat specific symptoms or diseases but to address the root causes of illness and promote overall wellness.

Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine, is a medical model that uses molecular profiling and various diagnostic tests to understand the genetic and environmental variations affecting an individual's health and disease susceptibility. It aims to tailor medical treatments, including prevention strategies, diagnostics, therapies, and follow-up care, to each person's unique needs and characteristics. By incorporating genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and other "omics" data into clinical decision-making, individualized medicine strives to improve patient outcomes, reduce adverse effects, and potentially lower healthcare costs.

Internal Medicine is a medical specialty that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of internal diseases affecting adults. It encompasses a wide range of medical conditions, including those related to the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematological, endocrine, infectious, and immune systems. Internists, or general internists, are trained to provide comprehensive care for adult patients, managing both simple and complex diseases, and often serving as primary care physicians. They may also subspecialize in various fields such as cardiology, gastroenterology, nephrology, or infectious disease, among others.

Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material, called radiopharmaceuticals, to diagnose and treat various diseases. The radiopharmaceuticals are taken internally, usually through injection or oral administration, and accumulate in specific organs or tissues. A special camera then detects the radiation emitted by these substances, which helps create detailed images of the body's internal structures and functions.

The images produced in nuclear medicine can help doctors identify abnormalities such as tumors, fractures, infection, or inflammation. Additionally, some radiopharmaceuticals can be used to treat certain conditions, like hyperthyroidism or cancer, by delivering targeted doses of radiation directly to the affected area. Overall, nuclear medicine provides valuable information for the diagnosis, treatment planning, and monitoring of many medical conditions.

Traditional medicine (TM) refers to health practices, approaches, knowledge and beliefs incorporating plant, animal and mineral-based medicines, spiritual therapies, manual techniques and exercises, applied singularly or in combination to treat, diagnose and prevent illnesses or maintain well-being. Although traditional medicine has been practiced since prehistoric times, it is still widely used today and may include:

1. Traditional Asian medicines such as acupuncture, herbal remedies, and qigong from China; Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani and Siddha from India; and Jamu from Indonesia.
2. Traditional European herbal medicines, also known as phytotherapy.
3. North American traditional indigenous medicines, including Native American and Inuit practices.
4. African traditional medicines, such as herbal, spiritual, and manual techniques practiced in various African cultures.
5. South American traditional medicines, like Mapuche, Curanderismo, and Santo Daime practices from different countries.

It is essential to note that traditional medicine may not follow the scientific principles, evidence-based standards, or quality control measures inherent to conventional (also known as allopathic or Western) medicine. However, some traditional medicines have been integrated into modern healthcare systems and are considered complementary or alternative medicines (CAM). The World Health Organization encourages member states to develop policies and regulations for integrating TM/CAM practices into their healthcare systems, ensuring safety, efficacy, and quality while respecting cultural diversity.

Kampo medicine is a traditional Japanese herbal medicine that has been officially integrated into the Japanese healthcare system since the late 19th century. It is based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) principles and theories, but it has evolved independently in Japan over centuries to reflect local medical needs, cultural preferences, and pharmacological research.

Kampo medicine typically involves the use of complex formulas containing multiple herbs, rather than single herbs, to address various health conditions and restore balance within the body. The formulas are often adjusted based on individual patient's symptoms, constitution, and physical condition. Kampo practitioners receive extensive training in both modern Western medicine and traditional Japanese medicine, allowing them to integrate both approaches for a more holistic treatment strategy.

Kampo has been recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a valuable component of traditional medicine and is increasingly being studied in clinical trials to evaluate its efficacy and safety for various health issues, including gastrointestinal disorders, menopausal symptoms, and mental health conditions.

Medicine is a branch of healthcare that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, injury, and illness. It encompasses a variety of health profession practices, including but not limited to, the services provided by physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, and allied health professionals.

Medicine can also refer to the substances or compounds used in the treatment and prevention of disease, often referred to as medications or drugs. These substances can be administered in various forms, such as oral (pills, liquids), topical (creams, ointments), injectable (shots, IVs), or inhaled (aerosols, nebulizers).

Overall, medicine is a multidisciplinary field that combines scientific research, clinical expertise, and patient values to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment for individuals and communities.