Factor XII, also known as Hageman factor, is a protein that plays a role in the coagulation cascade, which is the series of events that leads to the formation of a blood clot. It is one of the zymogens, or inactive precursor proteins, that becomes activated and helps to trigger the coagulation process.

When Factor XII comes into contact with negatively charged surfaces, such as damaged endothelial cells or artificial surfaces like those found on medical devices, it undergoes a conformational change and becomes activated. Activated Factor XII then activates other proteins in the coagulation cascade, including Factor XI, which ultimately leads to the formation of a fibrin clot.

Deficiencies in Factor XII are generally not associated with bleeding disorders, as the coagulation cascade can still proceed through other pathways. However, excessive activation of Factor XII has been implicated in certain thrombotic disorders, such as deep vein thrombosis and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

Factor XII deficiency, also known as Hageman factor deficiency, is a rare genetic disorder characterized by a lack or dysfunction of coagulation factor XII. This protein is involved in the initiation of the coagulation cascade, which leads to the formation of a blood clot. People with Factor XII deficiency may have an increased risk of bleeding, but it is typically mild and not life-threatening. The diagnosis is usually made through blood tests that measure the level and function of Factor XII. Treatment is generally not necessary unless there is significant bleeding, in which case fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate may be given to provide temporary correction of the deficiency. It's important to note that Factor XII deficiency is not a common cause of bleeding disorders and it doesn't increase the risk of thrombosis.

Factor XIIa is a protease enzyme that plays a role in the coagulation cascade, which is the series of events that leads to blood clotting. It is formed when Factor XII, also known as Hageman factor, is activated by contact with negatively charged surfaces such as damaged endothelial cells or artificial surfaces like medical devices.

Once activated, Factor XIIa can activate other components of the coagulation cascade, including Factor XI, which ultimately leads to the formation of a fibrin clot. While Factor XIIa is an important part of the coagulation system, it is not essential for normal hemostasis (the process that stops bleeding) in humans, as people with deficiencies in Factor XII do not have an increased risk of bleeding. However, excessive activation of Factor XIIa has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including thrombosis and inflammation.

Prekallikrein is a zymogen, or inactive precursor, of the serine protease kallikrein. It is a protein that plays a role in the coagulation cascade and the kinin-kallikrein system. Prekallikrein is primarily produced in the liver and circulates in the bloodstream. When activated, prekallikrein is converted to kallikrein, which then participates in various physiological processes such as blood pressure regulation, inflammation, and fibrinolysis (the breakdown of blood clots). The activation of prekallikrein is facilitated by the surface of negatively charged activators like kininogen or collagen, in conjunction with factor XII (Hageman factor) in a positive feedback loop.

In summary, Prekallikrein is a crucial protein in the coagulation and kinin-kallikrein systems that becomes activated to kallikrein upon contact with negatively charged surfaces and factor XII, contributing to various physiological processes.

Kaolin is not a medical term per se, but it is a mineral that has various applications in the medical field. Medically, kaolin is used as an ingredient in some over-the-counter (OTC) medications and clinical products, particularly in oral and topical formulations.

Medical definition: Kaolin is a natural hydrated aluminum silicate clay mineral (with the chemical formula Al2Si2O5(OH)4) used in medical applications as an antidiarrheal agent and as a component in various dermatological products for its absorbent, protective, and soothing properties.

Kallikreins are a group of serine proteases, which are enzymes that help to break down other proteins. They are found in various tissues and body fluids, including the pancreas, kidneys, and saliva. In the body, kallikreins play important roles in several physiological processes, such as blood pressure regulation, inflammation, and fibrinolysis (the breakdown of blood clots).

There are two main types of kallikreins: tissue kallikreins and plasma kallikreins. Tissue kallikreins are primarily involved in the activation of kininogen, a protein that leads to the production of bradykinin, a potent vasodilator that helps regulate blood pressure. Plasma kallikreins, on the other hand, play a key role in the coagulation cascade by activating factors XI and XII, which ultimately lead to the formation of a blood clot.

Abnormal levels or activity of kallikreins have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and inflammatory disorders. For example, some studies suggest that certain tissue kallikreins may promote tumor growth and metastasis, while others indicate that they may have protective effects against cancer. Plasma kallikreins have also been linked to the development of thrombosis (blood clots) and inflammation in cardiovascular disease.

Overall, kallikreins are important enzymes with diverse functions in the body, and their dysregulation has been associated with various pathological conditions.

Collagen type XII is a type of collagen that is found in the extracellular matrix of various tissues, including tendons, ligaments, and skin. It is a fibril-associated collagen that is closely associated with collagens type I and III. Collagen type XII has been shown to play a role in regulating the organization and diameter of collagen fibrils. Mutations in the gene for collagen type XII have been associated with certain types of muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy, which are genetic disorders that affect muscle strength and tone. Additionally, it has been suggested to play a role in the development of osteoarthritis.

Kininogens are a group of proteins found in the blood plasma that play a crucial role in the inflammatory response and blood coagulation. They are precursors to bradykinin, a potent vasodilator and inflammatory mediator. There are two types of kininogens: high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK) and low molecular weight kininogen (LMWK). HMWK is involved in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation, while LMWK is responsible for the release of bradykinin. Both kininogens are important targets in the regulation of inflammation and hemostasis.

Sulfoglycosphingolipids are a type of glycosphingolipid that contain a sulfate ester group in their carbohydrate moiety. They are important components of animal cell membranes and play a role in various biological processes, including cell recognition, signal transduction, and cell adhesion.

The most well-known sulfoglycosphingolipids are the sulfatides, which contain a 3'-sulfate ester on the galactose residue of the glycosphingolipid GalCer (galactosylceramide). Sulfatides are abundant in the nervous system and have been implicated in various neurological disorders.

Other sulfoglycosphingolipids include the seminolipids, which contain a 3'-sulfate ester on the galactose residue of lactosylceramide (Galβ1-4Glcβ1-Cer), and are found in high concentrations in the testis.

Abnormalities in sulfoglycosphingolipid metabolism have been associated with several genetic disorders, such as metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD), which are characterized by progressive neurological deterioration.

Factor XI, also known as plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA) or antihemophilic factor C, is a protein involved in blood coagulation. It is one of the factors in the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, which is activated when blood comes into contact with negatively charged surfaces, such as damaged blood vessels.

When Factor XI is activated (usually by thrombin or activated Factor XII), it activates more Factor XI and also activates Factor IX, leading to the formation of a complex that converts Factor X to its active form, Factor Xa. This ultimately leads to the formation of a fibrin clot and helps to stop bleeding.

Deficiencies in Factor XI can lead to an increased risk of bleeding, although the severity of the bleeding disorder can vary widely among individuals with Factor XI deficiency. Treatment for Factor XI deficiency typically involves replacement therapy with fresh frozen plasma or recombinant Factor XI concentrate.

Blood coagulation, also known as blood clotting, is a complex process that occurs in the body to prevent excessive bleeding when a blood vessel is damaged. This process involves several different proteins and chemical reactions that ultimately lead to the formation of a clot.

The coagulation cascade is initiated when blood comes into contact with tissue factor, which is exposed after damage to the blood vessel wall. This triggers a series of enzymatic reactions that activate clotting factors, leading to the formation of a fibrin clot. Fibrin is a protein that forms a mesh-like structure that traps platelets and red blood cells to form a stable clot.

Once the bleeding has stopped, the coagulation process is regulated and inhibited to prevent excessive clotting. The fibrinolytic system degrades the clot over time, allowing for the restoration of normal blood flow.

Abnormalities in the blood coagulation process can lead to bleeding disorders or thrombotic disorders such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

Factor XI deficiency, also known as Hemophilia C or Rosenthal syndrome, is a rare bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency or dysfunction of coagulation factor XI. This protease plays an important role in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. Factor XI deficiency can lead to prolonged bleeding after surgery, trauma, or menstruation, but it typically does not cause spontaneous bleeding like Hemophilia A and B. The severity of the condition varies widely among affected individuals. Inheritance is autosomal recessive, meaning that two defective copies of the gene (one from each parent) are necessary to have the disease.

Ellagic acid is a type of polyphenol, which is a class of organic compounds characterized by the presence of multiple phenol units. It is found in various fruits and vegetables, including raspberries, strawberries, pomegranates, and walnuts. Ellagic acid has been studied for its potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties. However, more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish a clear medical definition of ellagic acid. It is not considered a medication or a treatment for any specific medical condition.

Kinins are a group of endogenous inflammatory mediators that are involved in the body's response to injury or infection. They are derived from the decapeptide bradykinin and its related peptides, which are formed by the enzymatic cleavage of precursor proteins called kininogens.

Kinins exert their effects through the activation of specific G protein-coupled receptors, known as B1 and B2 receptors. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the body, including in the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems.

Activation of kinin receptors leads to a range of physiological responses, including vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, pain, and smooth muscle contraction. Kinins are also known to interact with other inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes, to amplify the inflammatory response.

In addition to their role in inflammation, kinins have been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, including hypertension, asthma, arthritis, and pain. As such, kinin-targeted therapies are being explored as potential treatments for these and other diseases.

Plasma Kallikrein is a serine protease enzyme that plays a crucial role in the coagulation cascade and kinin-kallikrein system. It's produced as an inactive precursor, known as prekallikrein, which is activated when cleaved by factor XIIa (Hageman factor) into its active form, kallikrein.

Once activated, plasma kallikrein can cleave several substrates, including high-molecular-weight kininogen (HK). This results in the release of bradykinin, a potent vasodilator that contributes to increased vascular permeability and inflammation. Plasma kallikrein also activates factor XII, creating a positive feedback loop that amplifies the coagulation cascade and the kinin-kallikrein system.

Plasma kallikrein is involved in several physiological processes, such as blood pressure regulation, inflammation, and fibrinolysis (the breakdown of blood clots). Dysregulation of plasma kallikrein activity has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including hereditary angioedema, thrombosis, and sepsis.

High Molecular Weight Kininogen (HMWK) is a glycoprotein that is synthesized in the liver and circulates in the bloodstream. It is a precursor to bradykinin, a potent vasodilator and inflammatory mediator. HMWK plays a crucial role in the coagulation cascade as well as in the activation of the contact system, which includes the intrinsic pathway of coagulation and the fibrinolytic system.

HMWK is called "high molecular weight" because it has a larger molecular weight than its counterpart, low molecular weight kininogen (LMWK). HMWK is involved in several physiological processes, including blood coagulation, inflammation, and innate immunity. It is also a target for various proteases, such as thrombin, factor XIa, and plasma kallikrein, which can cleave it to release bradykinin and other bioactive peptides.

In summary, High Molecular Weight Kininogen (HMWK) is a glycoprotein that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, inflammation, and innate immunity. It serves as a precursor to bradykinin and is involved in the activation of the contact system.

Complement C1 Inactivator proteins are a part of the complement system, which is a group of proteins in the blood that play a crucial role in the body's immune defense system. Specifically, Complement C1 Inactivator proteins are responsible for regulating the activation of the first component of the complement system, C1.

The complement system is activated in response to the presence of foreign substances such as bacteria or viruses in the body. The activation of C1 leads to a cascade of reactions that result in the destruction of the foreign substance. However, if this process is not properly regulated, it can lead to damage to the body's own cells and tissues.

Complement C1 Inactivator proteins help to prevent this by regulating the activation of C1. They do this by binding to and inhibiting the activity of C1, preventing it from initiating the complement cascade. A deficiency in Complement C1 Inactivator proteins can lead to a condition called hereditary angioedema, which is characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling in various parts of the body.

Blood coagulation tests, also known as coagulation studies or clotting tests, are a series of medical tests used to evaluate the blood's ability to clot. These tests measure the functioning of various clotting factors and regulatory proteins involved in the coagulation cascade, which is a complex process that leads to the formation of a blood clot to prevent excessive bleeding.

The most commonly performed coagulation tests include:

1. Prothrombin Time (PT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of calcium and tissue factor, which activates the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. The PT is reported in seconds and can be converted to an International Normalized Ratio (INR) to monitor anticoagulant therapy.
2. Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of calcium, phospholipid, and a contact activator, which activates the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. The aPTT is reported in seconds and is used to monitor heparin therapy.
3. Thrombin Time (TT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of thrombin, which directly converts fibrinogen to fibrin. The TT is reported in seconds and can be used to detect the presence of fibrin degradation products or abnormalities in fibrinogen function.
4. Fibrinogen Level: Measures the amount of fibrinogen, a protein involved in clot formation, present in the blood. The level is reported in grams per liter (g/L) and can be used to assess bleeding risk or the effectiveness of fibrinogen replacement therapy.
5. D-dimer Level: Measures the amount of D-dimer, a protein fragment produced during the breakdown of a blood clot, present in the blood. The level is reported in micrograms per milliliter (µg/mL) and can be used to diagnose or exclude venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE).

These tests are important for the diagnosis, management, and monitoring of various bleeding and clotting disorders. They can help identify the underlying cause of abnormal bleeding or clotting, guide appropriate treatment decisions, and monitor the effectiveness of therapy. It is essential to interpret these test results in conjunction with a patient's clinical presentation and medical history.

Rutin is a flavonoid, a type of plant pigment that is found in various plants and foods including citrus fruits, buckwheat, and asparagus. It has antioxidant properties and is known to help strengthen blood vessels and reduce inflammation. In medical terms, rutin may be mentioned in the context of discussing treatments for conditions related to these effects, such as varicose veins or hemorrhoids. However, it's important to note that while rutin has potential health benefits, more research is needed to fully understand its effects and proper dosages.

Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) is a medical laboratory test that measures the time it takes for blood to clot. It's more specifically a measure of the intrinsic and common pathways of the coagulation cascade, which are the series of chemical reactions that lead to the formation of a clot.

The test involves adding a partial thromboplastin reagent (an activator of the intrinsic pathway) and calcium to plasma, and then measuring the time it takes for a fibrin clot to form. This is compared to a control sample, and the ratio of the two times is calculated.

The PTT test is often used to help diagnose bleeding disorders or abnormal blood clotting, such as hemophilia or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of anticoagulant therapy, such as heparin. Prolonged PTT results may indicate a bleeding disorder or an increased risk of bleeding, while shortened PTT results may indicate a hypercoagulable state and an increased risk of thrombosis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Glass" is not a medical term. Glass is a non-crystalline amorphous solid that is often transparent and has various uses in everyday life, including medical devices and equipment. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, please provide them, and I'll be happy to help.

Low-molecular-weight kininogen (LMMK) is a protein that plays a role in the blood coagulation and fibrinolysis systems. It is a precursor to bradykinin, a potent vasodilator and inflammatory mediator. LMMK is cleaved by proteases, such as factor XIIa and kallikrein, to release bradykinin.

LMMK has a molecular weight of approximately 68-72 kDa and is synthesized in the liver. It is found in plasma and is involved in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. LMMK is also known as Fitzgerald factor, and its deficiency can lead to an increased risk of bleeding.

It's important to note that while I strive to provide accurate and up-to-date information, this definition may not be fully comprehensive or nuanced. For a more detailed understanding, it is recommended to consult medical textbooks, peer-reviewed articles, or speak with healthcare professionals.

Dextran sulfate is a type of polysaccharide (a complex carbohydrate) that is made up of repeating units of the sugar dextran, which has been sulfonated (introduced with a sulfonic acid group). It is commonly used as a molecular weight standard in laboratory research and can also be found in some medical products.

In medicine, dextran sulfate is often used as a treatment for hemodialysis patients to prevent the formation of blood clots in the dialyzer circuit. It works by binding to and inhibiting the activity of certain clotting factors in the blood. Dextran sulfate may also have anti-inflammatory effects, and it has been studied as a potential treatment for conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and hepatitis.

It is important to note that dextran sulfate can have side effects, including allergic reactions, low blood pressure, and bleeding. It should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare professional.

Surface properties in the context of medical science refer to the characteristics and features of the outermost layer or surface of a biological material or structure, such as cells, tissues, organs, or medical devices. These properties can include physical attributes like roughness, smoothness, hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity, and electrical conductivity, as well as chemical properties like charge, reactivity, and composition.

In the field of biomaterials science, understanding surface properties is crucial for designing medical implants, devices, and drug delivery systems that can interact safely and effectively with biological tissues and fluids. Surface modifications, such as coatings or chemical treatments, can be used to alter surface properties and enhance biocompatibility, improve lubricity, reduce fouling, or promote specific cellular responses like adhesion, proliferation, or differentiation.

Similarly, in the field of cell biology, understanding surface properties is essential for studying cell-cell interactions, cell signaling, and cell behavior. Cells can sense and respond to changes in their environment, including variations in surface properties, which can influence cell shape, motility, and function. Therefore, characterizing and manipulating surface properties can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of cellular processes and offer new strategies for developing therapies and treatments for various diseases.

Zinc is an essential mineral that is vital for the functioning of over 300 enzymes and involved in various biological processes in the human body, including protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, immune function, wound healing, and cell division. It is a component of many proteins and participates in the maintenance of structural integrity and functionality of proteins. Zinc also plays a crucial role in maintaining the sense of taste and smell.

The recommended daily intake of zinc varies depending on age, sex, and life stage. Good dietary sources of zinc include red meat, poultry, seafood, beans, nuts, dairy products, and fortified cereals. Zinc deficiency can lead to various health problems, including impaired immune function, growth retardation, and developmental delays in children. On the other hand, excessive intake of zinc can also have adverse effects on health, such as nausea, vomiting, and impaired immune function.

The Complement C1 Inhibitor protein, also known as C1-INH, is a protein involved in the regulation of the complement system and the contact system, which are parts of the immune system. The complement system helps to eliminate pathogens (e.g., bacteria, viruses) from the body, while the contact system helps to regulate blood coagulation and inflammation.

C1-INH works by inhibiting the activation of C1, an enzyme complex that is the first component of the classical complement pathway. By inhibiting C1, C1-INH prevents the activation of downstream components of the complement system, thereby helping to regulate the immune response and prevent excessive inflammation.

Deficiencies or dysfunction in the C1-INH protein can lead to a group of genetic disorders known as C1 inhibitor deficiency disorders, which include hereditary angioedema (HAE) and acquired angioedema (AAE). These conditions are characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling in various parts of the body, such as the face, hands, feet, and airway, which can be painful and potentially life-threatening if they affect the airway.

Factor XIa is a serine protease enzyme that plays a crucial role in blood coagulation. It is formed through the activation of Factor XI, which is one of the key components in the intrinsic pathway of the coagulation cascade. The activation of Factor XI to Factor XIa occurs via either autoactivation or through the action of thrombin. Once activated, Factor XIa can cleave and activate Factor IX, leading to the formation of Factor IXa, which further amplifies the coagulation cascade.

In summary, Factor XIa is a vital enzyme in the blood coagulation process, contributing to the formation of a stable fibrin clot that helps prevent excessive bleeding during injury or trauma.

Chromogenic compounds are substances that can be converted into a colored product through a chemical reaction. These compounds are often used in various diagnostic tests, including microbiological assays and immunoassays, to detect the presence or absence of a specific analyte (such as a particular bacterium, enzyme, or antigen).

In these tests, a chromogenic substrate is added to the sample, and if the target analyte is present, it will react with the substrate and produce a colored product. The intensity of the color can often be correlated with the amount of analyte present in the sample, allowing for quantitative analysis.

Chromogenic compounds are widely used in clinical laboratories because they offer several advantages over other types of diagnostic tests. They are typically easy to use and interpret, and they can provide rapid results with high sensitivity and specificity. Additionally, chromogenic assays can be automated, which can help increase throughput and reduce the potential for human error.

Benzamidines are a group of organic compounds that contain a benzene ring linked to an amidine functional group. They are commonly used as antimicrobial agents, particularly in the treatment of various gram-negative bacterial infections. Benzamidines work by inhibiting the enzyme bacterial dehydrogenases, which are essential for the bacteria's survival.

Some examples of benzamidine derivatives include:

* Tempanamine hydrochloride (Tembaglanil): used to treat urinary tract infections caused by susceptible strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.
* Chlorhexidine: a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent used as a disinfectant and preservative in various medical and dental applications.
* Prothiobenzamide: an anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug used to treat gout and rheumatoid arthritis.

It is important to note that benzamidines have a narrow therapeutic index, which means that the difference between an effective dose and a toxic dose is small. Therefore, they should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

"Kringles" is not a term commonly used in medical literature. It is a term that originates from Scandinavian folklore, referring to a mythical figure who delivers gifts and sweets to children. However, in the context of biochemistry and cell biology, Kringle domains are structural motifs found in certain proteins.

Kringle domains are small, compact protein domains that contain approximately 80-100 amino acids, characterized by a distinctive pattern of disulfide bonds. These domains are named after the Danish pastry "kringle," which has a knot-like shape similar to the structure of these protein domains. Kringle domains are found in several proteins involved in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation, such as plasminogen, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). They play a role in protein-protein interactions, cell signaling, and protease activation.

The hypoglossal nerve, also known as the 12th cranial nerve (CN XII), is primarily responsible for innervating the muscles of the tongue, allowing for its movement and function. These muscles include the intrinsic muscles that alter the shape of the tongue and the extrinsic muscles that position it in the oral cavity. The hypoglossal nerve also has some minor contributions to the innervation of two muscles in the neck: the sternocleidomastoid and the trapezius. These functions are related to head turning and maintaining head position. Any damage to this nerve can lead to weakness or paralysis of the tongue, causing difficulty with speech, swallowing, and tongue movements.

Acrylamide is a chemical that is primarily used in the production of polyacrylamide, which is a widely used flocculent in the treatment of wastewater and drinking water. Acrylamide itself is not intentionally added to food or consumer products. However, it can form in certain foods during high-temperature cooking processes, such as frying, roasting, and baking, particularly in starchy foods like potatoes and bread. This occurs due to a reaction between amino acids (such as asparagine) and reducing sugars (like glucose or fructose) under high heat.

Acrylamide has been classified as a probable human carcinogen based on animal studies, but the risks associated with dietary exposure are still being researched. Public health organizations recommend minimizing acrylamide intake by varying cooking methods and avoiding overly browned or burnt foods.

Alpha-2-antiplasmin (α2AP) is a protein found in the blood plasma that inhibits fibrinolysis, the process by which blood clots are broken down. It does this by irreversibly binding to and inhibiting plasmin, an enzyme that degrades fibrin clots.

Alpha-2-antiplasmin is one of the most important regulators of fibrinolysis, helping to maintain a balance between clot formation and breakdown. Deficiencies or dysfunction in alpha-2-antiplasmin can lead to an increased risk of bleeding due to uncontrolled plasmin activity.

Adsorption is a process in which atoms, ions, or molecules from a gas, liquid, or dissolved solid accumulate on the surface of a material. This occurs because the particles in the adsorbate (the substance being adsorbed) have forces that attract them to the surface of the adsorbent (the material that the adsorbate is adhering to).

In medical terms, adsorption can refer to the use of materials with adsorptive properties to remove harmful substances from the body. For example, activated charcoal is sometimes used in the treatment of poisoning because it can adsorb a variety of toxic substances and prevent them from being absorbed into the bloodstream.

It's important to note that adsorption is different from absorption, which refers to the process by which a substance is taken up and distributed throughout a material or tissue.