Expectorants are a type of medication that help to thin and loosen mucus in the airways, making it easier to cough up and clear the airways. They work by increasing the production of fluid in the respiratory tract, which helps to moisten and soften thick or sticky mucus. This makes it easier for the cilia (tiny hair-like structures that line the airways) to move the mucus out of the lungs and into the throat, where it can be swallowed or spit out.

Expectorants are often used to treat respiratory conditions such as bronchitis, pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which can cause excessive mucus production and difficulty breathing. Some common expectorants include guaifenesin, iodinated glycerol, and potassium iodide.

It is important to follow the dosage instructions carefully when taking expectorants, as taking too much can lead to side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It is also important to drink plenty of fluids while taking expectorants, as this can help to thin the mucus and make it easier to cough up.

Guaifenesin is a medication that belongs to the class of expectorants. According to the Medical Dictionary by Farlex, guaifenesin is defined as:

"A salicylate-free agent with expectorant properties; it increases respiratory secretions and decreases their viscosity, making coughs more productive. It is used as an antitussive in bronchitis and other respiratory tract infections."

Guaifenesin works by helping to thin and loosen mucus in the airways, making it easier to cough up and clear the airways of bothersome mucus and phlegm. It is commonly available as an over-the-counter medication for relieving symptoms associated with a common cold, flu, or other respiratory infections.

Guaifenesin can be found in various forms, such as tablets, capsules, liquid, or extended-release products. Common brand names of guaifenesin include Mucinex and Robitussin. It is important to follow the recommended dosage on the product label and consult a healthcare professional if you have any questions about its use or if your symptoms persist for more than one week.

Bromhexine is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs known as mucolytic agents. It works by thinning and loosening mucus in the airways, making it easier to cough up and clear the airways. This can be particularly helpful for people with respiratory conditions such as bronchitis, emphysema, and chronic bronchitis.

Bromhexine is available in various forms, including tablets, syrup, and solution for inhalation. It is typically taken two to three times a day, and the dosage may vary depending on the individual's age, weight, and medical condition.

It is important to follow the instructions of a healthcare provider when taking bromhexine or any other medication. Side effects of bromhexine may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, and dizziness. In rare cases, it may cause more serious side effects such as allergic reactions, difficulty breathing, or irregular heartbeat. People with a history of asthma, stomach ulcers, or bleeding disorders should use bromhexine with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare provider.