An ethical theory is a structured framework of principles and concepts that helps to guide and inform moral judgments and decisions about right and wrong conduct. It provides a systematic and coherent approach to understanding, analyzing, and resolving ethical issues and dilemmas in various contexts, including healthcare.

There are several types of ethical theories, but some of the most prominent ones include:

1. Deontological theory: This theory emphasizes the inherent rightness or wrongness of actions based on whether they conform to moral rules or duties, regardless of their consequences. It is often associated with the work of Immanuel Kant.
2. Utilitarianism: This theory holds that the morality of an action is determined by its overall usefulness or benefit to society as a whole, measured in terms of the greatest good for the greatest number of people.
3. Virtue ethics: This theory focuses on the character and virtues of the moral agent, rather than on specific rules or consequences. It emphasizes the importance of cultivating good habits, traits, and dispositions that contribute to a flourishing and fulfilling life.
4. Social contract theory: This theory posits that moral norms and rules emerge from mutual agreements or understandings among individuals in society, based on their shared interests and values.
5. Feminist ethics: This theory challenges traditional ethical theories by emphasizing the importance of context, relationships, and power dynamics in moral decision-making, with a focus on promoting justice and equality for marginalized groups.

In healthcare, ethical theories can help guide clinical practice, research, policy, and education, by providing a framework for addressing complex ethical issues such as informed consent, patient autonomy, confidentiality, resource allocation, and end-of-life care.

Beneficence is a principle in medical ethics that means to act in the best interest of the patient. It involves providing benefits and balancing benefits against risks and harms. Healthcare providers are expected to promote well-being, prevent harm, and remove harmful conditions for their patients. Beneficence also includes considerations such as respecting autonomy, being honest and transparent, and ensuring fairness and justice in the provision of healthcare.

Ethical analysis is a process of evaluating and assessing the moral implications and principles surrounding a particular medical situation, treatment, or research. It involves critical thinking and consideration of various ethical theories, principles, and guidelines to determine the right course of action. The steps in an ethical analysis typically include:

1. Identifying the ethical issue: This involves recognizing and defining the problem or dilemma that requires ethical consideration.
2. Gathering relevant information: This includes gathering all necessary medical and contextual information related to the situation, including the patient's values, preferences, and cultural background.
3. Identifying stakeholders: This involves identifying all those who are affected by or have a vested interest in the ethical issue.
4. Applying ethical principles: This involves applying ethical principles such as autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to the situation to determine the right course of action.
5. Considering alternative courses of action: This involves exploring different options and their potential consequences for all stakeholders.
6. Making a decision: This involves weighing the various factors and coming to a conclusion about what is the right thing to do.
7. Reflecting on the decision: This involves reflecting on the decision-making process and considering whether the decision was fair, just, and respectful of all parties involved.

Ethical analysis is an essential tool for healthcare professionals, researchers, and policymakers to ensure that their actions are guided by moral principles and values.

"Personal Autonomy" is not a medical term per se, but it is often used in medical ethics and patient care. It refers to the ability of an individual to make informed decisions about their own health and healthcare, based on their own values, beliefs, and preferences, without undue influence or coercion from others. This includes the right to accept or refuse medical treatment, to maintain confidentiality, and to participate in shared decision-making with healthcare providers. Personal autonomy is recognized as a fundamental principle in medical ethics and patient rights, and is protected by laws and regulations in many countries.

A psychological theory is a proposed explanation or framework that aims to describe, explain, and predict psychological phenomena. It is based on established scientific principles and methods, and it integrates various observations, facts, and findings to provide a coherent understanding of psychological processes and behaviors. Psychological theories can encompass a wide range of topics, including cognition, emotion, motivation, perception, personality, learning, memory, development, and psychopathology. They are used to guide research, inform clinical practice, and advance our knowledge of the human mind and behavior.