Dioxins are a group of chemically-related compounds that are primarily formed as unintended byproducts of various industrial, commercial, and domestic processes. They include polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and certain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Dioxins are highly persistent environmental pollutants that accumulate in the food chain, particularly in animal fat. Exposure to dioxins can cause a variety of adverse health effects, including developmental and reproductive problems, immune system damage, hormonal disruption, and cancer. The most toxic form of dioxin is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).

Benzofurans are a class of organic compounds that consist of a benzene ring fused to a furan ring. The furan ring is a five-membered aromatic heterocycle containing one oxygen atom and four carbon atoms. Benzofurans can be found in various natural and synthetic substances. Some benzofuran derivatives have biological activity and are used in medicinal chemistry, while others are used as flavorings or fragrances. However, some benzofuran compounds are also known to have psychoactive effects and can be abused as recreational drugs.

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of man-made organic chemicals consisting of 209 individual compounds, known as congeners. The congeners are formed by the combination of two benzene rings with varying numbers and positions of chlorine atoms.

PCBs were widely used in electrical equipment, such as transformers and capacitors, due to their non-flammability, chemical stability, and insulating properties. They were also used in other applications, including coolants and lubricants, plasticizers, pigments, and copy oils. Although PCBs were banned in many countries in the 1970s and 1980s due to their toxicity and environmental persistence, they still pose significant health and environmental concerns because of their continued presence in the environment and in products manufactured before the ban.

PCBs are known to have various adverse health effects on humans and animals, including cancer, immune system suppression, reproductive and developmental toxicity, and endocrine disruption. They can also cause neurological damage and learning and memory impairment in both human and animal populations. PCBs are highly persistent in the environment and can accumulate in the food chain, leading to higher concentrations in animals at the top of the food chain, including humans.

Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) is not a common medical term, but it is known in toxicology and environmental health. TCDD is the most toxic and studied compound among a group of chemicals known as dioxins.

Medical-related definition:

Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) is an unintended byproduct of various industrial processes, including waste incineration, chemical manufacturing, and pulp and paper bleaching. It is a highly persistent environmental pollutant that accumulates in the food chain, primarily in animal fat. Human exposure to TCDD mainly occurs through consumption of contaminated food, such as meat, dairy products, and fish. TCDD is a potent toxicant with various health effects, including immunotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, and carcinogenicity. The severity of these effects depends on the level and duration of exposure.

'Incineration' is not typically used as a medical term, but it does have relevance to the field of medicine and public health. It generally refers to the process of destroying something, usually waste, through extreme heat and combustion. In the medical context, incineration is often discussed in relation to the disposal of healthcare waste, including infectious materials, sharps, and pharmaceutical products. Proper incineration can help reduce the volume of waste, destroy harmful components, and prevent the spread of infection. However, it's important to note that improper incineration practices can also release toxic emissions into the environment, posing risks to public health.

Environmental pollutants are defined as any substances or energy (such as noise, heat, or light) that are present in the environment and can cause harm or discomfort to humans or other living organisms, or damage the natural ecosystems. These pollutants can come from a variety of sources, including industrial processes, transportation, agriculture, and household activities. They can be in the form of gases, liquids, solids, or radioactive materials, and can contaminate air, water, and soil. Examples include heavy metals, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter, and greenhouse gases.

It is important to note that the impact of environmental pollutants on human health and the environment can be acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) and it depends on the type, concentration, duration and frequency of exposure. Some common effects of environmental pollutants include respiratory problems, cancer, neurological disorders, reproductive issues, and developmental delays in children.

It is important to monitor, control and reduce the emissions of these pollutants through regulations, technology advancements, and sustainable practices to protect human health and the environment.

Aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs) are a type of intracellular receptor that play a crucial role in the response to environmental contaminants and other xenobiotic compounds. They are primarily found in the cytoplasm of cells, where they bind to aromatic hydrocarbons, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are common environmental pollutants.

Once activated by ligand binding, AhRs translocate to the nucleus, where they dimerize with the AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) protein and bind to specific DNA sequences called xenobiotic response elements (XREs). This complex then regulates the expression of a variety of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, including those encoding cytochrome P450 enzymes.

In addition to their role in xenobiotic metabolism, AhRs have been implicated in various physiological processes, such as immune response, cell differentiation, and development. Dysregulation of AhR signaling has been associated with the pathogenesis of several diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and neurodevelopmental disorders.

Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of AhR activation and regulation is essential for developing strategies to prevent or treat environmental toxicant-induced diseases and other conditions linked to AhR dysfunction.

Food contamination is the presence of harmful microorganisms, chemicals, or foreign substances in food or water that can cause illness or injury to individuals who consume it. This can occur at any stage during production, processing, storage, or preparation of food, and can result from various sources such as:

1. Biological contamination: This includes the presence of harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi that can cause foodborne illnesses. Examples include Salmonella, E. coli, Listeria, and norovirus.

2. Chemical contamination: This involves the introduction of hazardous chemicals into food, which may occur due to poor handling practices, improper storage, or exposure to environmental pollutants. Common sources of chemical contamination include pesticides, cleaning solvents, heavy metals, and natural toxins produced by certain plants or fungi.

3. Physical contamination: This refers to the presence of foreign objects in food, such as glass, plastic, hair, or insects, which can pose a choking hazard or introduce harmful substances into the body.

Preventing food contamination is crucial for ensuring food safety and protecting public health. Proper hygiene practices, temperature control, separation of raw and cooked foods, and regular inspections are essential measures to minimize the risk of food contamination.

Environmental exposure refers to the contact of an individual with any chemical, physical, or biological agent in the environment that can cause a harmful effect on health. These exposures can occur through various pathways such as inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact. Examples of environmental exposures include air pollution, water contamination, occupational chemicals, and allergens. The duration and level of exposure, as well as the susceptibility of the individual, can all contribute to the risk of developing an adverse health effect.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be some confusion in your question. "Refuse disposal" is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used in waste management and public health. It refers to the process of getting rid of waste materials generated from human activities, such as household trash or clinical waste from hospitals and healthcare facilities.

However, if you are referring to the medical management of patients who refuse treatment or disposal of their remains after death, here are some relevant definitions:

* "Refusal of treatment" is a term used in medical ethics and law to describe a situation where a patient declines medical intervention or care. This can occur for various reasons, including lack of consent, lack of decision-making capacity, or religious or cultural beliefs.
* "Disposition of human remains" refers to the handling, processing, and final placement of a deceased person's body. In the context of patients who refuse treatment and die, this may involve arranging for their bodies to be transported to a funeral home, crematorium, or other designated facility for disposal.

I hope this clarifies any confusion. Let me know if you have any further questions!

"Body burden" is a term used in the field of environmental health to describe the total amount of a chemical or toxic substance that an individual has accumulated in their body tissues and fluids. It refers to the overall load or concentration of a particular chemical or contaminant that an organism is carrying, which can come from various sources such as air, water, food, and consumer products.

The term "body burden" highlights the idea that people can be exposed to harmful substances unknowingly and unintentionally, leading to potential health risks over time. Some factors that may influence body burden include the frequency and duration of exposure, the toxicity of the substance, and individual differences in metabolism, elimination, and susceptibility.

It is important to note that not all chemicals or substances found in the body are necessarily harmful, as some are essential for normal bodily functions. However, high levels of certain environmental contaminants can have adverse health effects, making it crucial to monitor and regulate exposure to these substances.

Chlorophenols are a group of chemical compounds that consist of a phenol ring substituted with one or more chlorine atoms. They are widely used as pesticides, disinfectants, and preservatives. Some common examples of chlorophenols include pentachlorophenol, trichlorophenol, and dichlorophenol.

Chlorophenols can be harmful to human health and the environment. They have been linked to a variety of adverse health effects, including skin and eye irritation, respiratory problems, damage to the liver and kidneys, and an increased risk of cancer. Exposure to chlorophenols can occur through contact with contaminated soil, water, or air, as well as through ingestion or absorption through the skin.

It is important to handle chlorophenols with care and to follow proper safety precautions when using them. If you are concerned about exposure to chlorophenols, it is recommended that you speak with a healthcare professional for further guidance.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soil pollutants" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Soil pollution refers to the presence or accumulation of hazardous substances, chemicals, or other pollutants in soil that can have negative effects on plant life, human health, and the environment.

However, if you're asking about potential health effects of exposure to soil pollutants, it could include a variety of symptoms or diseases, depending on the specific pollutant. For example, exposure to lead-contaminated soil can lead to developmental delays in children, while exposure to certain pesticides or industrial chemicals can cause neurological problems, respiratory issues, and even cancer.

If you have more specific information about a particular substance or context, I may be able to provide a more precise answer.

Surgical tampons are medical devices that are used to pack or plug a cavity or wound in the body during surgical procedures. They are typically made of gauze, rayon, or synthetic materials and come in various shapes and sizes to accommodate different surgical needs. Surgical tampons can help control bleeding, prevent the accumulation of fluids, and maintain the position of organs or tissues during surgery. After the procedure, they are usually removed or allowed to dissolve naturally. It is important to note that surgical tampons should not be confused with feminine hygiene tampons used for menstruation.

Furans are not a medical term, but a class of organic compounds that contain a four-membered ring with four atoms, usually carbon and oxygen. They can be found in some foods and have been used in the production of certain industrial chemicals. Some furan derivatives have been identified as potentially toxic or carcinogenic, but the effects of exposure to these substances depend on various factors such as the level and duration of exposure.

In a medical context, furans may be mentioned in relation to environmental exposures, food safety, or occupational health. For example, some studies have suggested that high levels of exposure to certain furan compounds may increase the risk of liver damage or cancer. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential health effects of these substances.

It's worth noting that furans are not a specific medical condition or diagnosis, but rather a class of chemical compounds with potential health implications. If you have concerns about exposure to furans or other environmental chemicals, it's best to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized advice and recommendations.

Environmental monitoring is the systematic and ongoing surveillance, measurement, and assessment of environmental parameters, pollutants, or other stressors in order to evaluate potential impacts on human health, ecological systems, or compliance with regulatory standards. This process typically involves collecting and analyzing data from various sources, such as air, water, soil, and biota, and using this information to inform decisions related to public health, environmental protection, and resource management.

In medical terms, environmental monitoring may refer specifically to the assessment of environmental factors that can impact human health, such as air quality, water contamination, or exposure to hazardous substances. This type of monitoring is often conducted in occupational settings, where workers may be exposed to potential health hazards, as well as in community-based settings, where environmental factors may contribute to public health issues. The goal of environmental monitoring in a medical context is to identify and mitigate potential health risks associated with environmental exposures, and to promote healthy and safe environments for individuals and communities.

Chlorinated hydrocarbons are a group of organic compounds that contain carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and chlorine (Cl) atoms. These chemicals are formed by replacing one or more hydrogen atoms in a hydrocarbon molecule with chlorine atoms. The properties of chlorinated hydrocarbons can vary widely, depending on the number and arrangement of chlorine and hydrogen atoms in the molecule.

Chlorinated hydrocarbons have been widely used in various industrial applications, including as solvents, refrigerants, pesticides, and chemical intermediates. Some well-known examples of chlorinated hydrocarbons are:

1. Methylene chloride (dichloromethane) - a colorless liquid with a mild sweet odor, used as a solvent in various industrial applications, including the production of pharmaceuticals and photographic films.
2. Chloroform - a heavy, volatile, and sweet-smelling liquid, used as an anesthetic in the past but now mainly used in chemical synthesis.
3. Carbon tetrachloride - a colorless, heavy, and nonflammable liquid with a mildly sweet odor, once widely used as a solvent and fire extinguishing agent but now largely phased out due to its ozone-depleting properties.
4. Vinyl chloride - a flammable, colorless gas, used primarily in the production of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic and other synthetic materials.
5. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) - a group of highly stable and persistent organic compounds that were widely used as coolants and insulating fluids in electrical equipment but are now banned due to their toxicity and environmental persistence.

Exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons can occur through inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion, depending on the specific compound and its physical state. Some chlorinated hydrocarbons have been linked to various health effects, including liver and kidney damage, neurological disorders, reproductive issues, and cancer. Therefore, proper handling, use, and disposal of these chemicals are essential to minimize potential health risks.

Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 is an enzyme that is part of the cytochrome P450 family, which are a group of enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics (foreign substances) in the body. Specifically, CYP1A1 is found primarily in the liver and lungs and plays a role in the metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are chemicals found in tobacco smoke and are produced by the burning of fossil fuels and other organic materials.

CYP1A1 also has the ability to activate certain procarcinogens, which are substances that can be converted into cancer-causing agents (carcinogens) within the body. Therefore, variations in the CYP1A1 gene may influence an individual's susceptibility to cancer and other diseases.

The term "P-450" refers to the fact that these enzymes absorb light at a wavelength of 450 nanometers when they are combined with carbon monoxide, giving them a characteristic pink color. The "CYP" stands for "cytochrome P," and the number and letter designations (e.g., 1A1) indicate the specific enzyme within the family.

Drug residues refer to the remaining amount of a medication or drug that remains in an animal or its products after the treatment period has ended. This can occur when drugs are not properly metabolized and eliminated by the animal's body, or when withdrawal times (the recommended length of time to wait before consuming or selling the animal or its products) are not followed.

Drug residues in animals can pose a risk to human health if consumed through the consumption of animal products such as meat, milk, or eggs. For this reason, regulatory bodies set maximum residue limits (MRLs) for drug residues in animal products to ensure that they do not exceed safe levels for human consumption.

It is important for farmers and veterinarians to follow label instructions and recommended withdrawal times to prevent the accumulation of drug residues in animals and their products, and to protect public health.

Chemical water pollutants refer to harmful chemicals or substances that contaminate bodies of water, making them unsafe for human use and harmful to aquatic life. These pollutants can come from various sources, including industrial and agricultural runoff, sewage and wastewater, oil spills, and improper disposal of hazardous materials.

Examples of chemical water pollutants include heavy metals (such as lead, mercury, and cadmium), pesticides and herbicides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and petroleum products. These chemicals can have toxic effects on aquatic organisms, disrupt ecosystems, and pose risks to human health through exposure or consumption.

Regulations and standards are in place to monitor and limit the levels of chemical pollutants in water sources, with the aim of protecting public health and the environment.

Medical definitions of terms often come from authoritative sources such as those produced by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), or the World Health Organization (WHO). However, I couldn't find a specific medical definition for 'poultry products' in these resources. Instead, poultry products are commonly defined by food safety authorities such as the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) or the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

According to the USDA, "Poultry products" are items that are derived from the whole carcasses, parts, or portions of poultry carcasses, such as chicken, turkey, duck, goose, guinea fowl, and ratites (emus and ostriches). These products include, but are not limited to, meat, skin, fat, bones, organs, eggs, and egg products.

It's important to note that poultry products can be a source of various bacteria, parasites, and viruses, including Salmonella, Campylobacter, Listeria, and avian influenza viruses. Proper handling, cooking, and storage are crucial steps in preventing foodborne illnesses associated with the consumption of poultry products.

Epichlorohydrin is an industrial chemical with the formula C3H5ClO. It is a colorless liquid with an irritating odor, and it is used primarily as a building block in the production of other chemicals, including epoxy resins, synthetic gums, and plastics. Epichlorohydrin is produced by reacting chlorine with propylene in the presence of a catalyst. It is classified as a probable human carcinogen based on evidence from animal studies, and exposure to this chemical can cause irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract. Therefore, it is important to handle epichlorohydrin with care and to use appropriate safety measures when working with this chemical.

Anion exchange resins are a type of ion exchange resin that are positively charged and used to remove anions (negatively charged ions) from aqueous solutions. These resins contain functional groups such as quaternary ammonium or tertiary amine groups, which can attract and retain anions like chloride, sulfate, or nitrate ions.

Anion exchange resins are commonly used in water treatment to remove excess dissolved salts, heavy metals, and other impurities from drinking water, industrial wastewater, and process water. They can also be used in the pharmaceutical industry for the purification of drugs and biomolecules, as well as in research and analytical applications.

When anions come into contact with the resin, they are attracted to the positively charged functional groups and exchanged for hydroxide ions (OH-) present on the resin surface. This exchange results in the formation of water and the release of the anion from the resin. The resin can then be regenerated by washing it with a strong base, which replaces the hydroxide ions and restores its ability to exchange anions.

Overall, anion exchange resins are important tools for removing unwanted anions from various types of solutions, including water, biological samples, and industrial process streams.

Human milk, also known as breast milk, is the nutrient-rich fluid produced by the human female mammary glands to feed and nourish their infants. It is the natural and species-specific first food for human babies, providing all the necessary nutrients in a form that is easily digestible and absorbed. Human milk contains a balance of proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, and other bioactive components that support the growth, development, and immunity of newborns and young infants. Its composition changes over time, adapting to meet the changing needs of the growing infant.

Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique that combines the separating power of gas chromatography with the identification capabilities of mass spectrometry. This method is used to separate, identify, and quantify different components in complex mixtures.

In GC-MS, the mixture is first vaporized and carried through a long, narrow column by an inert gas (carrier gas). The various components in the mixture interact differently with the stationary phase inside the column, leading to their separation based on their partition coefficients between the mobile and stationary phases. As each component elutes from the column, it is then introduced into the mass spectrometer for analysis.

The mass spectrometer ionizes the sample, breaks it down into smaller fragments, and measures the mass-to-charge ratio of these fragments. This information is used to generate a mass spectrum, which serves as a unique "fingerprint" for each compound. By comparing the generated mass spectra with reference libraries or known standards, analysts can identify and quantify the components present in the original mixture.

GC-MS has wide applications in various fields such as forensics, environmental analysis, drug testing, and research laboratories due to its high sensitivity, specificity, and ability to analyze volatile and semi-volatile compounds.

A "chemical hazard release" is a situation where there is an uncontrolled or accidental release of chemicals into the environment, which can pose a threat to human health and the ecosystem. This can occur due to various reasons such as equipment failure, human error, natural disasters, or intentional acts. The released chemicals can be in the form of gas, liquid, or solid and can vary in their level of toxicity, flammability, reactivity, and corrosiveness. Examples of chemical hazard releases include leakage from chemical storage tanks, spills during transportation, accidental fires or explosions at industrial facilities, and illegal dumping of chemicals into water bodies or landfills. It is important to have proper safety measures and emergency response plans in place to minimize the risks associated with chemical hazard releases.

Pesticide residues refer to the remaining pesticide chemicals, including their metabolites and degradation products, that are present in or on food commodities or environmental samples after a pesticide application has ended. These residues can result from agricultural use, such as spraying crops to control pests, or from non-agricultural uses, like treating buildings for termite control.

Regulatory agencies establish maximum residue limits (MRLs) to ensure that the levels of pesticide residues in food and feed are below those that may pose a risk to human health. Monitoring programs are in place to check compliance with these MRLs, and enforcement actions can be taken if violations occur.

It's important to note that not all pesticide residues are harmful, as some pesticides degrade into harmless compounds over time or leave behind residues below levels of concern for human health. However, long-term exposure to even low levels of certain pesticide residues may still pose a risk and should be avoided when possible.

The Maximum Allowable Concentration (MAC) is a term used in occupational health to refer to the highest concentration of a hazardous substance (usually in air) that should not cause harmful effects to most workers if they are exposed to it for a typical 8-hour workday, 5 days a week. It's important to note that MAC values are based on average population data and may not protect everyone, particularly those who are sensitive or susceptible to the substance in question.

It's also crucial to differentiate MAC from other similar terms such as the Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) or Threshold Limit Value (TLV), which are used in different regulatory contexts and may have slightly different definitions and criteria.

Please consult with a certified industrial hygienist, occupational health professional, or other appropriate experts for specific guidance related to hazardous substance exposure limits.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Russia" is not a medical term or concept. Russia is the largest country in the world by land area, located primarily in Asia with a smaller portion extending into Europe. It is a nation rich in history and culture, known for its diverse landscapes, from tundra and forests to subtropical beaches.

If you have any medical questions or terms that you would like me to define, please feel free to ask!

"Maternal exposure" is a medical term that refers to the contact or interaction of a pregnant woman with various environmental factors, such as chemicals, radiation, infectious agents, or physical environments, which could potentially have an impact on the developing fetus. This exposure can occur through different routes, including inhalation, ingestion, dermal contact, or even transplacentally. The effects of maternal exposure on the fetus can vary widely depending on the type, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the stage of pregnancy at which it occurs. It is important to monitor and minimize maternal exposure to potentially harmful substances or environments during pregnancy to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and developing fetus.

Pentachlorophenol is not primarily a medical term, but rather a chemical compound with some uses and applications in the medical field. Medically, it's important to understand what pentachlorophenol is due to its potential health implications.

Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is an organochlorine compound that has been widely used as a pesticide, wood preservative, and disinfectant. Its chemical formula is C6HCl5O. It is a white crystalline solid with a distinct, somewhat unpleasant odor. In the environment, pentachlorophenol can be found in soil, water, and air as well as in various organisms, including humans.

Pentachlorophenol has been associated with several potential health risks. It is classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and as a possible human carcinogen by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Exposure to pentachlorophenol can occur through inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion. Potential health effects include irritation of the skin, eyes, and respiratory tract; damage to the liver and kidneys; neurological issues; and reproductive problems.

In a medical context, pentachlorophenol might be relevant in cases where individuals have been exposed to this compound through occupational or environmental sources. Medical professionals may need to assess potential health risks, diagnose related health issues, and provide appropriate treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Michigan" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical location, referring to the state of Michigan in the United States. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Herbicides are a type of pesticide used to control or kill unwanted plants, also known as weeds. They work by interfering with the growth processes of the plant, such as inhibiting photosynthesis, disrupting cell division, or preventing the plant from producing certain essential proteins.

Herbicides can be classified based on their mode of action, chemical composition, and the timing of their application. Some herbicides are selective, meaning they target specific types of weeds while leaving crops unharmed, while others are non-selective and will kill any plant they come into contact with.

It's important to use herbicides responsibly and according to the manufacturer's instructions, as they can have negative impacts on the environment and human health if not used properly.

Chromatography, supercritical fluid (SFC) is a type of chromatographic technique that uses supercritical fluids as the mobile phase to separate and analyze components of a mixture. A supercritical fluid is a substance that is maintained at temperatures and pressures above its critical point, where it exhibits properties of both a gas and a liquid, making it an ideal medium for separations due to its low viscosity, high diffusivity, and tuneable solvating strength.

In SFC, the supercritical fluid, typically carbon dioxide (CO2) due to its mild critical point conditions, is used to elute analytes from a stationary phase, such as a silica or polymer-based column. The interactions between the analytes and the stationary phase, along with the properties of the supercritical fluid, determine the separation efficiency and resolution of the technique.

SFC has several advantages over traditional liquid chromatography (LC) techniques, including faster analysis times, lower solvent consumption, and the ability to analyze a wider range of polar and nonpolar compounds. SFC is commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry for drug discovery and development, as well as in environmental, food, and chemical analyses.