Civil rights are a group of rights and protections that guarantee equal treatment to all individuals, regardless of their race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or other characteristics. These rights are enshrined in the laws and constitutions of various countries and include freedoms such as the right to vote, the right to a fair trial, the right to equal protection under the law, and the right to freedom of speech, religion, and assembly.

In the United States, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a landmark piece of legislation that prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin in employment, education, and access to public accommodations. Other important civil rights laws in the U.S. include the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which protects the right to vote, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, which prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities.

Violations of civil rights can take many forms, including discrimination, harassment, intimidation, and violence. Those whose civil rights have been violated may be entitled to legal remedies, such as damages, injunctions, or orders for relief.

"Religious hospitals" are healthcare institutions that are affiliated with or managed by a religious organization. These hospitals often incorporate their religious values and beliefs into the care they provide, which may influence their policies, practices, and ethical guidelines. They may also serve specific communities and offer spiritual support to patients and their families. It's important to note that while these hospitals have a religious affiliation, they are still held to the same standards of care as other healthcare institutions and must comply with relevant laws and regulations.