Cebidae is a family of primates that includes monkeys and capuchins found in the tropical rainforests and woodlands of Central and South America. This family is divided into two subfamilies: Cebinae (capuchin monkeys) and Saimiriinae (squirrel monkeys). These animals are known for their adaptability, complex social structures, and diverse behaviors. They have a varied diet that includes fruits, nuts, seeds, insects, and small vertebrates. Some notable members of this family include the white-faced capuchin, the black-capped squirrel monkey, and the golden lion tamarin.

"Cebus" is a genus of New World monkeys, also known as capuchin monkeys. They are small to medium-sized primates that are native to Central and South America. Capuchin monkeys are named after the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, because of their similarity in color to the robes worn by the friars.

Capuchin monkeys are highly intelligent and social animals, living in groups of up to 30 individuals. They have a diverse diet that includes fruits, nuts, seeds, insects, and small vertebrates. Capuchin monkeys are known for their problem-solving abilities and have been observed using tools in the wild.

There are several species of capuchin monkeys, including the white-fronted capuchin (Cebus albifrons), the tufted capuchin (Cebus apella), and the weeper capuchin (Cebus olivaceus). They vary in size, coloration, and behavior, but all share the characteristic cap of hair on their heads that gives them their name.