Blood chemical analysis, also known as clinical chemistry or chemistry panel, is a series of tests that measure the levels of various chemicals in the blood. These tests can help evaluate the function of organs such as the kidneys and liver, and can also detect conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.

The tests typically include:

* Glucose: to check for diabetes
* Electrolytes (such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate): to check the body's fluid and electrolyte balance
* Calcium: to check for problems with bones, nerves, or kidneys
* Creatinine: to check for kidney function
* Urea Nitrogen (BUN): to check for kidney function
* Albumin: to check for liver function and nutrition status
* ALT (Alanine Transaminase) and AST (Aspartate Transaminase): to check for liver function
* Alkaline Phosphatase: to check for liver or bone disease
* Total Bilirubin: to check for liver function and gallbladder function
* Cholesterol: to check for heart disease risk
* Triglycerides: to check for heart disease risk

These tests are usually ordered by a doctor as part of a routine check-up, or to help diagnose and monitor specific medical conditions. The results of the blood chemical analysis are compared to reference ranges provided by the laboratory performing the test, which take into account factors such as age, sex, and race.

Sudden death is a term used to describe a situation where a person dies abruptly and unexpectedly, often within minutes to hours of the onset of symptoms. It is typically caused by cardiac or respiratory arrest, which can be brought on by various medical conditions such as heart disease, stroke, severe infections, drug overdose, or trauma. In some cases, the exact cause of sudden death may remain unknown even after a thorough post-mortem examination.

It is important to note that sudden death should not be confused with "sudden cardiac death," which specifically refers to deaths caused by the abrupt loss of heart function (cardiac arrest). Sudden cardiac death is often related to underlying heart conditions such as coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, or electrical abnormalities in the heart.

An autopsy, also known as a post-mortem examination or obduction, is a medical procedure in which a qualified professional (usually a pathologist) examines a deceased person's body to determine the cause and manner of death. This process may involve various investigative techniques, such as incisions to study internal organs, tissue sampling, microscopic examination, toxicology testing, and other laboratory analyses. The primary purpose of an autopsy is to gather objective evidence about the medical conditions and factors contributing to the individual's demise, which can be essential for legal, insurance, or public health purposes. Additionally, autopsies can provide valuable insights into disease processes and aid in advancing medical knowledge.

Bereavement is the state of loss or grief experienced when a person experiences the death of a loved one, friend, or family member. It is a normal response to the death of someone close and can involve a range of emotions such as sadness, anger, guilt, and anxiety. The grieving process can be different for everyone and can take time to work through. Professional support may be sought to help cope with the loss.

A coroner and medical examiner are officials in the legal system who are responsible for investigating and determining the cause of death in certain cases. While their roles can overlap, there are some differences between them.

A coroner is a public official who is typically appointed or elected to serve in a particular jurisdiction, such as a county or district. The coroner's primary responsibility is to investigate any sudden, unexpected, or suspicious deaths that occur within their jurisdiction. This may include deaths that occur due to violence, accidents, suicide, or unknown causes.

In order to determine the cause of death, the coroner may conduct an autopsy, order toxicology tests, and review medical records and other evidence. The coroner may also hold an inquest, which is a formal hearing in which witnesses are called to testify about the circumstances surrounding the death. Based on the evidence gathered during the investigation, the coroner will make a determination as to the cause and manner of death.

A medical examiner, on the other hand, is a physician who has completed specialized training in forensic pathology. Medical examiners are typically appointed or hired by a government agency, such as a state or county, to perform autopsies and investigate deaths.

Medical examiners are responsible for determining the cause of death in cases where there is a suspicion of foul play, as well as in other circumstances where the cause of death may not be immediately apparent. They may also testify in court as expert witnesses based on their findings.

In some jurisdictions, the roles of coroner and medical examiner are combined, with the official serving as both a public administrator and a trained physician. In other cases, the two roles are separate, with the coroner responsible for administrative functions and the medical examiner responsible for determining the cause of death.

Forensic pathology is a subspecialty of pathology that focuses on determining the cause and manner of death by examining a corpse. It involves applying scientific knowledge and techniques to investigate criminal or suspicious deaths, often in conjunction with law enforcement agencies. A forensic pathologist performs autopsies (postmortem examinations) to evaluate internal and external injuries, diseases, and other conditions that may have contributed to the individual's death. They also collect evidence such as tissue samples, which can be used for toxicological, microbiological, or histological analysis. The information gathered by forensic pathologists is crucial in helping to establish the facts surrounding a person's death and assisting legal proceedings.

The "cause of death" is a medical determination of the disease, injury, or event that directly results in a person's death. This information is typically documented on a death certificate and may be used for public health surveillance, research, and legal purposes. The cause of death is usually determined by a physician based on their clinical judgment and any available medical evidence, such as laboratory test results, autopsy findings, or eyewitness accounts. In some cases, the cause of death may be uncertain or unknown, and the death may be classified as "natural," "accidental," "homicide," or "suicide" based on the available information.

"Terminology as a topic" in the context of medical education and practice refers to the study and use of specialized language and terms within the field of medicine. This includes understanding the meaning, origins, and appropriate usage of medical terminology in order to effectively communicate among healthcare professionals and with patients. It may also involve studying the evolution and cultural significance of medical terminology. The importance of "terminology as a topic" lies in promoting clear and accurate communication, which is essential for providing safe and effective patient care.