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  • transgenic zebrafish
  • In late 2003, transgenic zebrafish that express green, red, and yellow fluorescent proteins became commercially available in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, transgenic zebrafish with GFP-tagged thrombocytes have been developed which helped to study the production of thrombocytes and their precursors as well as their functional roles not only in hemostasis but also hematopoiesis. (hindawi.com)
  • Jun Chen and Jinrong Peng, from Zhejian University (China), describe the use of transgenic zebrafish to understand the roles that different naturally occurring forms of the tumor suppressor gene p53 play in regulating cell cycle, metabolism, organ development, and cell aging and death. (redorbit.com)
  • genes
  • Contrary to the fruit fly, Drosophila, and the worm, C. Elegans, which have been pivotal in our understanding of genes and phenotypes, zebrafish are vertebrates, and therefore much more relevant for human physiology in health and disease. (roche.com)
  • In particular, Massachusetts Institute of Technology ( MIT ) researchers recently revealed that they took a fresh approach to understanding the roles of genes linked to autism and demonstrated how zebrafish could be utilized in examining the genes that contribute to human brain disorders. (redorbit.com)
  • As such, Sive and other researchers began looking at zebrafish genes that were analogous to the human genes found in region 16p11.2. (redorbit.com)
  • Image 2 (below): Zebrafish with certain genes turned off during embryonic development (center and right images) showed abnormalities of brain formation (top row) and axon wiring (bottom row). (redorbit.com)
  • Since we introduced the zebrafish model for the study of hemostasis and thrombosis, other groups have adapted this model to study genes that are associated with thrombocyte function and a few novel genes have also been identified. (hindawi.com)
  • Sequencing revealed that 71.4% of human genes have at least one zebrafish ortholog. (uniprot.org)
  • Currently the zebrafish genome is thought to have more than 26,000 protein-coding genes. (uniprot.org)
  • Noting the "relative ease and low costs of transgenesis"""putting human genes into zebrafish""and the unique benefits of working with zebrafish, especially related to imaging, genetics, and transplantation, Dr. Leach predicts that, "Future zebrafish cancer research exploiting these fundamental advantages will be especially likely to generate novel insights not achievable using other model systems," in his Introduction to the issue entitled, "Pisces and Cancer: The Stars Align. (redorbit.com)
  • larval
  • With the help of co-author PSC's Art Wetzel, they led an international collaboration that used these images to reconstruct specific nerve cells that spanned nearly the entire larval zebrafish brain. (psc.edu)
  • Our goal [was] to develop techniques that allow researchers to examine the morphology and circuit connectivity of any neuron in the brain of a larval zebrafish at about five days after fertilization. (psc.edu)
  • Zebrafish have the ability to regenerate many of their tissues including fins, skin, heart and, in larval stages, brain. (uniprot.org)
  • genetic
  • Through genetic modification you can make zebrafish glow in the dark in different colours. (roche.com)
  • Keeping this in mind we introduced zebrafish, a vertebrate genetic model to study platelet function. (hindawi.com)
  • We establish T5D as a model that is representative of diversity levels within laboratory zebrafish lines and demonstrate that experimental design and analysis can exert major effects when characterizing genetic diversity in heterogeneous populations. (springer.com)
  • In the paper entitled "Identification of a Heritable Model of Testicular Germ Cell Tumor in the Zebrafish," authors Joanie Neumann, Jennifer Dhepard Dovey, Garvin Chandler, Liliana Carbajal, and James Amatruda, describe the development of a zebrafish model that carries a genetic mutation making the fish highly susceptible to the development of testicular tumors. (redorbit.com)
  • Mary Ann Lie
  • The zebrafish, a translucent fish often used as a model of human development and disease, offers unique advantages for studying the cause, growth, and spread of tumors using strategies and methods presented in the current "Cancer Biology" special issue of Zebrafish, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. ( http://www.liebertpub.com/ ). (redorbit.com)
  • organs
  • Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. (hindawi.com)
  • vivo
  • The zebrafish is an alternative in vivo model which is currently being evaluated at Roche to study the effects of compounds on target organ toxicities. (roche.com)
  • molecular
  • The zebrafish pronephric kidney provides a simple, yet powerful, model system to better understand the conserved molecular and cellular progresses that drive nephron formation, structure, and function. (springer.com)
  • Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming. (hindawi.com)
  • screens
  • These advantages have led to an upward trend in high-throughput zebrafish chemical screens, especially toward screens of many chemicals using large quantities of fish (Usenko et al. (springer.com)
  • Zebrafish are especially amenable to phenotype-based drug discovery (PDD) screens. (genengnews.com)
  • In fact, PDD screens performed on zebrafish have led to the identification of some lead compounds of therapeutic potential. (genengnews.com)
  • experimental
  • This lesson complements the film The Biology of Skin Color and explores how experimental work in zebrafish led to a better understanding of the role of the gene SLC24A5 in human skin color. (hhmi.org)
  • development
  • Zebrafish is being used in Roche research and early development for both safety and efficacy studies. (roche.com)
  • Chen YH, Chang CF, Lai YY, Sun CY, Ding YJ, Tsai JN (2015) von Hippel-Lindau gene plays a role during zebrafish pronephros development. (springer.com)
  • novel
  • We theorize that some subset of the novel SNPs may be shared with other zebrafish lines but have not been identified in other studies due to the limitations of capturing population diversity in pooled sequencing strategies. (springer.com)
  • Their paper "p53 Isoform à "113p53 in Zebrafish" discusses the potential use of this particular p53 isoform for characterizing factors in the p53 pathway and screening for novel cancer therapies. (redorbit.com)
  • study
  • Zebrafish Study Reveals First Fine Structure of a Complete Vertebrate Brain. (psc.edu)
  • Recently published methods facilitate genetical engineering of zebrafish, allowing the study of targets of interest in an easily accessible vertebrate system: a multiorgan culture model. (roche.com)
  • A new study utilized zebrafish in a study regarding human brain disorders. (redorbit.com)
  • This is really nice work that shows the importance of zebrafish in revealing disease mechanisms related to human mental disorders - in this case, autism," mentioned Su Guo , an associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences at the University of California at San Francisco who´s unaffiliated in the study, in the statement. (redorbit.com)
  • Zebrafish have been used to study cancers, including melanoma, leukemia, pancreatic cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. (uniprot.org)
  • SALT LAKE CITY, Dec. 24 (UPI) -- A study of zebrafish has revealed ways to potentially slow or prevent the onset of cancerous tumors, the Huntsman Cancer Institute in Utah says. (upi.com)
  • A particular advantage of using zebrafish to study cancer biology is the ability to transplant human tumors into the fish using well-established methods. (redorbit.com)
  • found
  • The zebrafish is native to the streams of the southeastern Himalayan region, and is found in parts of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Myanmar. (wikipedia.org)
  • Standard toxicity experiments carried out in typical cell culture experiments lack the complexity found in small model organisms such as zebrafish. (genengnews.com)
  • Several studies have found strikingly similar mammalian and zebrafish toxicology profiles. (genengnews.com)
  • studies
  • While this work has only just begun, it may eventually shed new light on past studies of zebrafish behavior-and point the way toward a better understanding of more complex brains, such as ours. (psc.edu)
  • To generate image datasets containing all the nerve cells in the zebrafish brain and their many intricate connections, then-graduate-student Hildebrand had to dig deeper than the previous studies. (psc.edu)
  • brain
  • David Hildebrand, working in the laboratories of Florian Engert and Jeff Lichtman at Harvard University, took this work a step farther, creating electron microscopic images of the zebrafish brain cut into tens of thousands of slices. (psc.edu)
  • similar
  • The Zebrafish has been defined as "science's new supermodel," and as befitting a supermodel, it has already made the cover of prestigious magazines, including Science, Nature, New Scientist and others of similar caliber. (roche.com)
  • role
  • Using an electron microscope, Virginie Lecaudey in Darren Gilmour's group at EMBL captured this snapshot of the beginnings of an organ which plays a central role in how zebrafish perceive the world around them - the lateral line. (innovations-report.com)
  • image
  • Top-down view of many ultra-thin slices of a zebrafish larva head reassembled into a 3D image, with the slices seen edge on. (psc.edu)
  • body
  • The zebrafish is named for the five uniform, pigmented, horizontal, blue stripes on the side of the body, which are reminiscent of a zebra's stripes, and which extend to the end of the caudal fin. (wikipedia.org)
  • formation
  • The first step of pronephrogenesis in the zebrafish is the formation of the intermediate mesoderm during gastrulation, which occurs in response to secreted morphogens such as BMPs and Nodals. (springer.com)