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  • acute
  • In an angled-contact wound, the barrel is held at an acute angle to the skin, and gas and soot radiate outwards from where the gun does not touch the skin. (relentlessdefense.com)
  • skin
  • An entrance wound is surrounded by a reddish-brown area of abraded skin, known as the abrasion ring, and small amounts of blood escape through. (relentlessdefense.com)
  • In a hard-contact wound , the muzzle is held tightly against the skin. (relentlessdefense.com)
  • In loose-contact wounds, the muzzle is held lightly against the skin, and the soot that is carried by the gas is deposited in a zone around the entrance, which can be wiped away. (relentlessdefense.com)
  • In an incomplete-contact wound, the barrel is held against the skin, but in a place where the skin is not completely flat. (relentlessdefense.com)
  • In near-contact wounds, the muzzle is not in contact with the skin, but is very close. (relentlessdefense.com)
  • The entrance wound is surrounded by a wide zone of powder soot, and seared, blackened skin. (relentlessdefense.com)
  • In intermediate-range wounds, the muzzle is held away from the skin but close enough that it still produces powder tattooing. (relentlessdefense.com)
  • results
  • A contact wound results when the muzzle is held against the body at the time of discharge, and can be further divided into hard, loose, angled, and incomplete contact wounds. (relentlessdefense.com)
  • head
  • In some cases, the wound can be both penetrating and perforating, in that it penetrates some part of the body, such as the head, but perforates certain parts, such as the skull or brain . (relentlessdefense.com)
  • immediate
  • There is little external evidence that it is a contact wound, although if you inspect the entrance you will usually find searing and powder blackening of the immediate edge of the wound, while an autopsy will reveal particles of soot and unburnt powder in the wound track. (relentlessdefense.com)