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  • racial
  • The Court also argued that the racial difference between Indians and whites was so great that the "great body of our people" would reject assimilation with Indians. (infogalactic.com)
  • The statistical flaw that mars the entire research becomes even clearer when the author states that ' all of the descriptive statistics and studies referred to here are based on the social classification of individuals into racial groups as black and white, although virtually all American blacks have some degree of European Caucasian ancestry. (physicsforums.com)
  • People of mixed racial ancestry, called mestizos, are found mostly in the small towns and rural areas of the interior, although in recent decades, thousands have migrated to the cities in search of work and a better way of life. (scholastic.com)
  • He used the 1924 Racial Integrity Act to classify Virginia Indians and mixed-race individuals as "colored," and therefore denied basic civil rights under Virginia's system of segregation. (melungeon.org)
  • PC1 reflects the racial contrast between Caucasoids and Mongoloids, while PC2 reflects the much weaker latitudinal adaptation and south-to-north spread of humans into the higher latitudes. (blogspot.com)
  • In the Old World, the gradual transition in appearances from one racial group to adjacent racial groups emphasized that "one variety of mankind does so sensibly pass into the other, that you cannot mark out the limits between them," as Blumenbach observed in his writings on human variation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, social and legal conventions developed over time that forced individuals of mixed ancestry into simplified racial categories. (wikipedia.org)
  • In other countries in the Americas, where mixing among groups was more extensive, social non racial categories have tended to be more numerous and fluid, with people moving into or out of categories on the basis of a combination of socioeconomic status, social class, ancestry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, efforts to track mixing between census racial groups led to a proliferation of categories (such as mulatto and octoroon) and "blood quantum" distinctions that became increasingly untethered from self-reported ancestry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caucasian
  • Since this admixture is generally so low as to have no influence on phenotype, I believe that these people, technically 'impure' though they are, should identify as white, Caucasian, or with whatever European, Middle Eastern, Central Asian, or North African background they possess. (city-data.com)
  • 20th century
  • While anti-Asian racism was embedded in U.S. politics and culture in the early 20th century, Indians were also racialized for their anticolonialism, with U.S. officials, casting them as a "Hindu" menace, pushing for Western imperial expansion abroad. (wikipedia.org)
  • neolithic
  • This is an important caveat, as American Indians and Central Asians are "pulled together" by their shared West Eurasian ancestry of post-Columbus and Neolithic/Chalcolithic Age origin respectively, and correspondingly "pulled away" by Mongoloids proper from East Asia who lack that admixture. (blogspot.com)
  • Black
  • The idea for Henry Louis Gates Jr .'s new series for PBS, 'Black in Latin America ,' stems from a surprising number: Of the roughly 11 million Africans who survived the trans-Atlantic slave trade, only about 450,000 came to the U.S. By contrast, about 5 million slaves went to Brazil alone, and roughly 700,000 went to Mexico and Peru. (foxnews.com)
  • We thought the prime black experience in the New World was in America. (foxnews.com)
  • For black Americans, Gates said, using similar terms would indicate some shame about being black. (foxnews.com)
  • Africans
  • A visitor from Portugal would also have to learn new words that have been added to the language by Africans and Indians. (scholastic.com)
  • blue eyed
  • I have a blond haired blue eyed cousin in Arkansas that has an Indian role card and can go to indian hospitals and all that but I guess it was from his dad who I'm not related to. (city-data.com)
  • Colonial
  • The fact that Uruguay was scarcely settled beyond a thin coastal strip during the colonial period meant that unlike many other areas of Latin America, little of its colonial heritage survived. (countrystudies.us)
  • Reputation
  • Despite its problems, Caracas's traditional charm, coupled with its reputation as one of Latin America 's most modern capitals, has for years drawn visitors from all over the world to its wonderful restaurants, museums, and nightlife. (encyclopedia.com)
  • admixture
  • More spread (given geographical distance) is also observed in Central Asia and Southeast Asia, and this is explained by relatively recent admixture between Caucasoids and Mongoloids (in the former) and Paleo-Indian-like morphological "Australoids" and Mongoloids (in the latter). (blogspot.com)
  • historically
  • Historically and spiritually, in all world cultures and religions, in folklore and mythology, every substance, every herb, every mineral, and every plant has a "spirit" or "entity" or "deity" assigned or associated with it. (technogypsie.com)
  • country's
  • Since 1914 the 51-mile- (82-km-) long Panama Canal , which connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, has afforded a long-sought shortcut for shipping and assures the country's standing as one of the most strategic transportation hubs of the world. (britannica.com)
  • The British dominated the country's economic and commercial development until World War I. In marked distinction to Chile's or Peru's minerals, however, Uruguay's prime productive asset (land) remained in the hands of Uruguayans, or at least settlers who wanted to become Uruguayans. (countrystudies.us)
  • history
  • Until the last few decades, the only strong effort to exhibit this art in galleries or museums was made by those few institutions specializing in ethnological, exotic, or art history subjects, together with the rare specialized museum devoted only to Indian materials or to those of the American West. (britannica.com)
  • It always amazes me how the world really doesn't understand the "root" of all things, nor pay attention to the "history" of various items or substances that they use occasionally or daily in life. (technogypsie.com)
  • tribal
  • In a tribal village of say, 50 individuals, aboriginal, Indian, what have you - how long before everyone, or even half the population, are related to the stranger who came into their group many moons ago? (straightdope.com)
  • Perhaps the greatest positive force to appear in some time are the Indian tribal councils and economic development boards, many of which support the arts in their own areas, not only to augment income but also out of an awareness of the cultural value of those arts. (britannica.com)
  • Independent origins of Indian caste and tribal paternal lineages. (springer.com)
  • religions
  • T he land now called the United States of America is where the worshippers of Yahweh fled to, to avoid persecution and murder coming from the religions, at that time, called the Pharisees, Sadducees, and Essenes. (yahweh.com)
  • little
  • Apparently Churchill's claim to be American Indian is also false, which would be a sad little bit of reverse snobbery except that Churchill used his alleged ancestry to claim credibility as a pundit on American Indian issues. (heinleinsociety.org)
  • One begins to think that the United states might be a little like the world imagined by Ghedini, Berlusconi's attorney: Even when the law is equal for everyone, its exercise and its application need no be equal - a random matter of class. (blogspot.com)
  • country
  • The Spanish greeting " Buenos días " is the way to say "good morning," "hello," or "good day" in every South American country except Brazil. (scholastic.com)