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  • populations
  • This might point to a positive fitness effects of the Wolbachia , which could help Wolbachia spread in populations," evolutionary geneticist Ary Hoffmann of The University of Melbourne, who was not involved in the research, wrote in an email to The Scientist . (the-scientist.com)
  • Numerous studies have examined the growth dynamics of Wolbachia within populations and the resultant rate of spatial spread. (aimsciences.org)
  • On the other hand, in natural populations of the closely-related D. melanogaster , the infecting Wolbachia doesn't interfere with host reproduction. (asmblog.org)
  • The idea is that by simply introducing Wolbachia into mosquito populations, via the release of infected mosquitoes, Wolbachia would spread and eventually most mosquitoes would become unable to transmit dengue and other viruses. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Therefore, the primary goal of the anti-Wolbachia (A·WOL) consortium is to find drugs and regimens that reduce the period of treatment from weeks to days (7 days or less), and to find drugs which would be safe in excluded target populations (pregnancy and children). (nih.gov)
  • Previously published findings by the authors have shown that a 4-week course of the tetracycline antibiotic, doxycycline, depletes Wolbachia populations in onchocerciasis and leads to long-term sterilization and a macrofilaricidal effect, whereas a 3-week course of doxycycline delivers sub-optimal effects. (medindia.net)
  • females
  • In the new study, cell biologist Horacio Frydman of Boston University and his colleagues showed Wolbachia can increase the number of eggs produced by D. mauritiana females. (the-scientist.com)
  • Electron microscopy and confocal imaging techniques demonstrated a substantial accumulation of Wolbachia in the germline stem cell niche (GSCN), where the stem cells that form the females' eggs are stored. (the-scientist.com)
  • Feminization, a process by which geneticly male organisms turn into females, characterizes the infections of male organisms by Wolbachia , which require females to reproduce and survive. (asu.edu)
  • in females, Wolbachia must somehow restore embryonic viability, through what is usually called ‘the rescue (rest) function.’ The occurrence of CI in crosses between males and females bearing different Wolbachia variants demonstrates that the mod and rest functions interact in a specific manner: different mod resc pairs make different compatibility types. (ebscohost.com)
  • hosts
  • Wolbachia are housed in the lateral chords and oocytes of their filarial nematode hosts. (kenyon.edu)
  • Vertically transmitted parasites (VTPs) such as Wolbachia are expected not only to minimize the damage they inflict on their hosts, but also to protect their hosts against the damaging effects of coinfecting parasites. (cambridge.org)
  • If this were the only factor, the percentage of Wolbachia -infected hosts would decrease with each generation. (asmblog.org)
  • You may be acquainted with one of these factors-the strategies some Wolbachia use to manipulate the reproduction of their hosts and thereby increase the number of infected individuals. (asmblog.org)
  • That 2.5% may sound small, but it causes the percentage of Wolbachia -infected hosts to decline generation after generation. (asmblog.org)
  • To reproduce, Wolbachia often exploit their hosts' reproductive processes. (asu.edu)
  • Wolbachia alter both reproduction and development of their hosts. (asu.edu)
  • As Wolbachia can affect the biology of their hosts, which can be disease vectors (for instance, mosquitos or human parasites), they are of utmost biomedical relevance. (cnrs.fr)
  • Culex
  • [ 3 ] En 1971, Janice Yen e A. Ralph Barr da UCLA descubriu que os ovos de Culex morrían debido a unha incompatibilidade citoplásmica cando o esperma dos machos infectados por Wolbachia fertilizaba ovos libres de infección. (wikipedia.org)
  • biology
  • The Wolbachia Project empowers biology educators to bring real-world scientific research into the classroom with inquiry, discovery, biotechnology, and a culture of excellence. (vanderbilt.edu)
  • My guess is that when researchers start to look in more detail in other systems, they're going to find that Wolbachia are routinely manipulating stem cell biology. (the-scientist.com)
  • M. H. Chan , P. S. Kim , Modelling a Wolbachia invasion using a slow-fast dispersal reaction-diffusion approach, Bulletin of Mathematical Biology , 75 (2013), 1501-1523. (aimsciences.org)
  • K. Fenn and M. Blaxter, " Wolbachia genomes: revealing the biology of parasitism and mutualism," Trends in Parasitology , vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 60-65, 2006. (hindawi.com)
  • parasitoid wasp
  • Evidence indicates either genetic exchange between Wolbachia in a parasitoid wasp and in the fly that it parasitizes or horizontal transfer of Wolbachia between the parasitoid and the fly, followed by a recombination event. (nih.gov)
  • sperm
  • It is also hypothesized that Wolbachia modifies sperm before spermatogenesis. (kenyon.edu)
  • In 1971, Janice Yen and Ralph Barr at the University of California in Los Angeles, California, found that mosquito eggs were killed when the sperm of males infected by Wolbachia fertilized non-infected eggs. (asu.edu)
  • reproductive
  • Our findings suggest that host symbiont interaction effects may play an important role in the induction of Wolbachia reproductive phenotypes. (mendeley.com)
  • Although Wolbachia- infected mosquitoes fare overall better than uninfected ones, Wolbachia does not confer a sufficiently high reproductive boost to mosquitoes to compensate for the reproductive losses inflicted by Plasmodium. (cambridge.org)
  • In summary, our results implicate that Wolbachia might be a frequent factor in host speciation, but usually only by contributing to overall reproductive isolation among other factors. (hu-berlin.de)
  • Transmission
  • This review outlines the current control methods for JEV in addition to highlighting the potential use of Wolbachia-based biocontrol strategies to impact transmission. (nih.gov)
  • JEV transmission cycle and potential inhibition through the introduction of Wolbachia -infected Cx . (nih.gov)
  • germline
  • Wolbachia are manipulating not only the levels of germline stem cell division, but they are blocking the rate of programmed cell death," Frydman said. (the-scientist.com)
  • onchocerciasis
  • Anti-Wolbachia drug discovery and development: safe macrofilaricides for onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. (nih.gov)
  • Professor Mark Taylor, Corresponding Author on the paper, said: "The anti-Wolbachia strategy has proved to be a paradigm changing therapeutic approach to the treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. (medindia.net)
  • Richard Stouthamer
  • [ 4 ] [ 5 ] En 1990, Richard Stouthamer da Universidade de California, Riverside descubriu que Wolbachia pode facer que os machos sexan prescindibles nalgunhas especies. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • Študija iz leta 2016 je namreč pokazala, da Wolbachia lahko pomaga pri omejitvi širjenja virusa v Braziliji. (wikipedia.org)
  • macrofilaricidal
  • Anti-Wolbachia therapy delivers safe macrofilaricidal activity with superior therapeutic outcomes compared to all standard anti-filarial treatments, with the added benefit of substantial improvements in clinical pathology. (nih.gov)
  • The study explored the development of a shorter treatment regimen, resulting in adult filarial worm death (macrofilaricidal), by using the antibiotic drug rifampicin to target Wolbachia. (medindia.net)
  • flies
  • Wolbachia -infected flies laid 3.5 to 4 times more eggs than uninfected individuals. (the-scientist.com)
  • A closer look at the activity of the cells within the niche revealed that the stem cells of Wolbachia -infected flies were dividing at a faster rate than their uninfected counterparts-about twice as quickly. (the-scientist.com)
  • Following the stem cells that divided and differentiated into egg cell precursors, the researchers found the answer: Compared with uninfected flies, the cells of Wolbachia -infested flies underwent only about half the amount of programmed cell death, a normal regulatory process of egg development. (the-scientist.com)
  • Recently, two research labs (click here and here ) independently reported that if the adult flies are infected with Wolbachia before being challenged with the virus, they survive longer. (asmblog.org)