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  • humpback whales
  • Since January 1, 2016, on the other side of the world, 41 humpback whales washed ashore along the U.S. eastern seaboard. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • In this video, a pair of scientists talk about their work in studying the communication patterns of humpback whales to learn more about how we might someday communicate with a possible extraterrestrial intelligence. (kottke.org)
  • Humpback whales "have had the Ocean Internet for millions of years" and can communicate directly with each other up to 1000 km away. (kottke.org)
  • Jem Cresswell swam with humpback whales, took over 10,000 black & white photos, and whittled them down into his series, Giants . (kottke.org)
  • In 2006, spindle cells, which were only thought to be present in humans and great apes, were also found to exist within the brains of humpback whales. (kottke.org)
  • These cells, which are tied to social organization, empathy, and intuition, were found to be more than three times as prevalent in humpback whales than they were in humans. (kottke.org)
  • There is evidence that humpback whales deliberately disrupt killer whale hunts , saving other animals from being killed by them. (kottke.org)
  • According to federal law, the Makah people of Washington State are entitled to hunt and kill one baleen whale, typically a gray whale, each year, though archeological records and oral history indicate a significant number of humpback whales were hunted as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • Limited numbers of Humpback Whales are hunted from Saint Vincent and the Grenadines . (wikipedia.org)
  • Japanese researchers now believe it is possible that the northernmost breeding region for humpback whales has shifted far northward to around Tokyo's Hachijo Island. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Normally the 'danger in the water' beat focuses on sharks, but here's a video of two divers almost getting eaten by two humpback whales. (kottke.org)
  • sperm whales
  • Sperm whales sleep together in a pod facing up in the water. (kottke.org)
  • Photographer Franco Banfi and his fellow divers were following this pod of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) when the giants suddenly seemed to fall into a vertical slumber. (kottke.org)
  • This phenomenon was first studied in 2008, when a team of biologists from the UK and Japan inadvertently drifted into a group of non-responsive sperm whales floating just below the surface. (kottke.org)
  • Sperm whales can dive over 6,500 feet, remaining under water for more than an hour. (amnh.org)
  • Among sperm whales' (and other toothed whales') most amazing adaptations is echolocation, the use of sound to locate objects based on their echoes−and a way of navigating the world that is also used by some land mammals, including bats. (amnh.org)
  • Called 'junk' by whalers, this organ contains fatty tissue that transmits sound, focusing the pulses in the process and allowing sperm whales to direct, or aim, sound waves. (amnh.org)
  • Sperm whales use their uniquely shaped nose to generate sound. (amnh.org)
  • Some species, such as sperm whales, are well adapted for diving to great depths to catch squid and other favoured prey. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sperm whales can live for more than 60 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Teeth ) Another synonym australasianus (" Australasian ") was applied to sperm whales in the southern hemisphere. (wikipedia.org)
  • Toothed whales such as sperm whales hunt their prey one by one. (amnh.org)
  • mammals
  • Toothed whales consist of some of the most widespread mammals, but some, as with the vaquita, are restricted to certain areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like other mammals, whales breathe air, are warm-blooded, and produce milk to feed their young. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Baffled by the behavior, the scientists analyzed data from tagged whales and discovered that these massive marine mammals spend about 7 percent of their time taking short (6- to 24-minute) rests in this shallow vertical position. (kottke.org)
  • Whales are a widely distributed and diverse group of fully aquatic placental marine mammals . (wikipedia.org)
  • Whales have evolved from land-living mammals. (wikipedia.org)
  • A major gap in our understanding of whale evolutionary history was rapidly filled in, and by 2001 a confluence of genetic and anatomical studies confirmed that whales are highly modified hoofed mammals called artiodactyls. (wired.com)
  • Beaked whales are one of the least known groups of mammals because of their deep-sea habitat and apparent low abundance. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Gulf of Maine study also found that the view of whales and other marine mammals as competitors for fishing, advocated by some nations, is incorrect as whales play a vital role in maintaining the productivity of phytoplankton and consequently the fish. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientists have long known that some beaked whales beach themselves and die in agony after exposure to naval sonar, and now they know why: the giant sea mammals suffer decompression sickness, just like scuba divers. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Whales are mammals and have many of the features and systems of mammal anatomy. (amnh.org)
  • But whales differ significantly from almost all other mammals-a result of their move from land to sea millions of years ago. (amnh.org)
  • The Navy has rejected a long list of measures that could reduce impacts to right whales, including seasonal restrictions on training during the right whale calving period, the use of third-party observers to help spot right whales and surveying the training area prior to exercises to ensure that no marine mammals are present. (savannahnow.com)
  • The Navy even refused to report marine mammals sighted during training exercises, because it would burden personnel during training exercises (an ironic explanation given the Navy's plan to rely on those same Navy personnel to spot and avoid collision with right whales). (savannahnow.com)
  • One of the oldest known techniques for killing these huge mammals was simply spying slow whales from shore before venturing out in boats to attack using lances and harpoons. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • hunt
  • The whales use this ability to, among other things, hunt successfully for deepwater prey, such as giant squid. (amnh.org)
  • The IWC is voting on whether or not to alow Japan to hunt whales for meat. (thepetitionsite.com)
  • Anti-whaling groups claim this hunt is not sustainable , though the IWC Scientific Committee, the same group that provided the above population estimate, projects a population growth of 3.2% per year. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hunt also took an average of one or two gray whales each year until 1996. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first Makah whale hunt in 70 years occurred on May 17, 1999, when they caught a north Pacific gray whale. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fact, the whaling is carried out by a single elderly man and his nephew who carry out the hunt using simple hand-held harpoons and wooden rowing boats. (wikipedia.org)
  • Toothed whales can use echolocation to hunt their prey. (amnh.org)
  • The Japanese state that they hunt whales for scientific reasons, which is legal under the moratorium, but this is a claim rejected as a "loophole" by many, including organisations such as Greenpeace. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • aquatic
  • As a result of this lack of information and the resemblance between Protocetus and fully aquatic fossil whales, Fraas' creature was also cast as a sea-dwelling mammal that was too late in the evolutionary transition to explain how whales became adapted to life in the water. (wired.com)
  • From these changes came the remarkable, fully aquatic lives of whales. (amnh.org)
  • bottlenose whale
  • Baird's and Cuvier's beaked whales were subject to commercial exploitation, off the coast of Japan , while the northern bottlenose whale was extensively hunted in the northern part of the North Atlantic late in the 19th and early 20th centuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Center for Whale Research
  • Photo identification over the last 38 years has allowed researchers to track the southern resident population quite accurately, such as the Orca ID site offered through the Center for Whale Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • gray whales
  • The hunts are now allowed to take 744 gray whales between 2013-2018, but the maximum amount in any one year is 140. (wikipedia.org)
  • Russians of Chukotka Autonomous Okrug in the Russian Far East are permitted to take up to 140 Gray Whales from the North-East Pacific population each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • mammal
  • That such an aquatically adapted whale was the direct descendant of a terrestrial genus of mammal was "inconceivable," and to Kellogg this indicated that the major transition from land to water must have occurred during some much earlier time. (wired.com)
  • The sperm whale is a pelagic mammal with a worldwide range, and will migrate seasonally for feeding and breeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plunging to 2,250 metres (7,382 ft), it is the second deepest diving mammal, following only the Cuvier's beaked whale . (wikipedia.org)
  • Georgia and Florida
  • At least 32 new right whale calves -- more than ever recorded -- have been observed this season off the coasts of Georgia and Florida, where the whales migrate to give birth between late November and March. (cnn.com)
  • After a more than a 1,400- mile journey south, female right whales return to Georgia and Florida to give birth to their calves from November to April. (savannahnow.com)
  • scientists
  • The scientists are also using Claude Shannon's information theory to study the complexity of the whales' language and eventually hope to use their findings to better detect the level of intelligence in alien messages and perhaps even the social structure of the alien civilization itself. (kottke.org)
  • Scientists think these brief naps may, in fact, be the only time the whales sleep. (kottke.org)
  • Scientists have long theorized that millions of years ago, whales had legs, dividing time between land and sea. (theweek.com)
  • Many scientists already thought modern whales evolved from hooved, deer-like creatures , and aegyptocetus could provide "valuable information about the transition from land to sea," says Yong. (theweek.com)
  • The very existence of the North Atlantic right whale is imperiled as scientists estimate that only between 300 and 400 whales remain. (savannahnow.com)
  • early whales
  • Contrary to the opinion of Fraas -- that such creatures belonged to a different evolutionary lineage than true whales -- R.L. affirmed that his German colleague's discovery actually strengthened the link between a group of archaic mammalian carnivores called creodonts on land and previously known early whales such as Basilosaurus . (wired.com)
  • Naturalists had not added very much to the known skeletal remains of Protocetus by the time whale expert Remington Kellogg inventoried the known specimens of early whales in 1936. (wired.com)
  • Starting with the description of Pakicetus in 1981, paleontologists began reporting on a wealth of early whales found in a geological swath from Egypt to India in strata spanning approximately 55 to 35 million years ago. (wired.com)
  • anatomical
  • One of the first anatomical descriptions of the airways of the whales on the basis of a harbor porpoise dates from 1671 by John Ray. (wikipedia.org)
  • dwarf sperm
  • Whales range in size from the 2.6 metres (8.5 ft) and 135 kilograms (298 lb) dwarf sperm whale to the 29.9 metres (98 ft) and 190 metric tons (210 short tons) blue whale , which is the largest creature that has ever lived. (wikipedia.org)
  • carcass
  • The carcass of a 10-meter-long whale that washed ashore on a beach in Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, last Sunday has been confirmed to be a blue whale - the largest known animal to have lived on Earth. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • dive
  • Some of the larger ones, like the sperm whale, can dive as deep as 1 mi (1.6 km). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Cuvier's beaked whales regularly dive for an hour at a depth over 1,000 m (3,300 ft), and the longest and deepest foraging dive recorded is 137.5 minutes at 2,992 m (9,816 ft). (wikipedia.org)
  • swim
  • The first cut suggests a frigid dawn at the Arctic Circle as a whale emerges, ready to begin the marathon swim. (latimes.com)
  • Two adult female right whales swim south off North Carolina last month toward their calving grounds. (savannahnow.com)