• Risk through medical procedures is very low as all donated blood is checked for West Nile virus before being used and the risk of getting West Nile virus through blood transfusions and organ transplants is very small, and should not prevent people who need surgery from having it. (news-medical.net)
  • It may take 3 to 5 years for the virus establish itself in North American wetland and urban ecosystems, putting significant numbers of U.S. citizens at risk. (sbir.gov)
  • Here are some basic facts about the virus and some things you can do to protect yourself, gleaned from a paper in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. by Dr. Robert W. Haley of the division of epidemiology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. (latimes.com)
  • The extent of the activity will depend upon the weather, presence of mosquito and bird populations for virus amplification, equine vaccination rates, and human activities to prevent transmission. (in.gov)
  • A number of North American bird species, including the blue jay, crow, and house sparrow, act as reservoirs of the virus. (infoplease.com)
  • The virus has also been identified in more than 250 bird species in the United States, including blue jays, ravens, magpies, sparrows, and starlings. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Testing for WNV on various animal species is conducted to quickly identify the virus so that control can be focused to prevent human cases of the disease. (washoecounty.us)
  • The researchers looked at 20 species that were regularly counted each breeding season and found that populations of 13 species were not down because of West Nile. (redorbit.com)
  • Other - less frequent - ways of spreading the virus include organ transplantation or blood transfusion. (childrens.com)
  • The first human West Nile disease in 2003 occurred in June, and one West Nile-infected blood transfusion was also identified that month. (wikipedia.org)
  • That happens in about one in 150 cases when the virus infects the brain and spinal cord, leading to an array of symptoms such as confusion and other thinking problems, weak muscles, stiff neck and movement disorders. (latimes.com)
  • The Department of Agriculture is monitoring animal populations for any signs of the virus. (psu.edu)
  • Risk of exposure and geographic distribution of West Nile virus vary from year to year with changes in distribution of insect vectors and reservoirs of the virus. (lsu.edu)
  • ELISA is a biochemistry technique in which the antigen (virus) is affixed to the surface of the test area and washed over with an antibody, which sticks to the antigen. (brighthub.com)
  • This is then tested to find the specific immunoglobin M (IgM) antibody corresponding to the virus. (brighthub.com)
  • The counties with the highest incidence of WNND were primarily in the west-central United States ( Figure 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Virus can also be identified in central nervous system tissue using techniques such as virus isolation, PCR and immunohistochemistry. (lsu.edu)