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  • climate change
  • Most scientists call it "climate change" unless they're specifically talking about the warming of the earth. (commondreams.org)
  • An OU study shows the effects of climate warming on soil microbes in a long-term climate change experiment in a tallgrass prairie ecosystem. (ou.edu)
  • NORMAN- A University of Oklahoma professor, Jizhong Zhou, and his team have completed a new study on the effects of climate warming on soil microbes in a long-term climate change experiment at a tallgrass prairie ecosystem. (ou.edu)
  • Our study is the first to demonstrate that environmental changes such as climate warming plays an important role in accelerating temporal turnover rates of soil bacterial and fungal communities, which are critical for predicting ecological consequences of future climate change," said Zhou, director, OU Institute for Environmental Genomics, and professor, OU College of Arts and Sciences. (ou.edu)
  • A new paper by Zhou and his team, "Climate warming leads to divergent succession of grassland microbial communities" is available in the online publication, Nature Climate Change. (ou.edu)
  • carbon
  • We've read the articles, we've seen the Gore movie, we've calculated our carbon footprint, and we're just not intellectually capable anymore of fully enjoying warm winter weather. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Still, we don't need anyone to tell us that some computer model in some climatologist's office is showing that a doubling of atmospheric carbon will lead over the next century to approximately 3 degrees Celsius warming in the average surface temperature of the planet, etc. (washingtonpost.com)
  • latitudes
  • In addition, a phenomenon called sudden stratospheric warming, apparently the result of strong downward air motion, also occurs in the late winter and spring at high latitudes. (britannica.com)
  • The warming raises air pressure, affecting air circulation between those latitudes and the equator, explains team member Thomas Reichler, at the University of Utah, US. (newscientist.com)
  • record
  • This week, PNAS published our paper Increase of Extreme Events in a Warming World , which analyses how many new record events you expect to see in a time series with a trend. (realclimate.org)
  • We conclude that the 2010 Moscow heat record is, with 80% probability, due to the long-term climatic warming trend. (realclimate.org)
  • conclude that climatic warming played no role in the Moscow heat record is because they found that there is no warming trend in July in Moscow. (realclimate.org)
  • diseases
  • We could see both a worsening of existing diseases as well as the spread of diseases usually associated with warmer regions, such as Ross River and Barmah Forest viral infections, to more temperate zones. (smh.com.au)
  • world
  • The atmosphere is warming faster in subtropical areas - around 30° north and south of the equator - than anywhere else in the world, according to a study of more than 25 years of satellite data. (newscientist.com)
  • Trend
  • In our study we were first interested in how the observed local warming trend in Moscow would have increased the number of expected heat records - regardless of what caused this warming trend. (realclimate.org)
  • increase
  • Even worse, warm water can also increase an animal's metabolism, meaning it requires more oxygen just to stay alive. (nytimes.com)
  • Warming, and the floods associated with it, are like to increase rates of both malaria and dengue, a debilitating viral disease found in tropical areas and transmitted by mosquito bites, said Maria Diuk-Wasser, assistant professor of epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health. (yaledailynews.com)
  • surface
  • In September 2008, The Independent newspaper reported how preliminary scientific findings suggested that massive deposits of subsea methane were bubbling to the surface as the Arctic region becomes warmer and its ice retreats. (sourcewatch.org)
  • earth
  • Therefore, Greenland and the North Pole should, in theory, be the warmest place on Earth when using the accepted basketball-like model of Earth. (google.com)
  • By stating that the Earth is simultaneously warming and cooling (see below), humanity is collectively stuck debating a fake issue, both sides of which are fraudulent in nature. (google.com)
  • form
  • This in turn means that the north and south jet streams - the rivers of fast-moving air that form the boundaries between warm tropical air and cold polar air - have also moved correspondingly closer to each pole. (newscientist.com)
  • water
  • Warm water makes the challenge even more difficult. (nytimes.com)
  • Warmer water can't hold as much dissolved oxygen as cold water. (nytimes.com)
  • You might expect that animals near the Equator would be at a greater risk, because the water was warm to begin with. (nytimes.com)
  • Were the nuclear plant still operating, one can't help wondering if Connecticut Yankee's warm-water discharge could have alleviated the Connecticut River ice buildup. (courant.com)
  • Do not put liquid or water in the warming drawer. (samsung.com)