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  • Congo
  • Ntaganda, a powerful general in the Congolese army, began his mutiny in eastern Congo at the end of March, following government attempts to weaken his control and increased calls for his arrest for alleged war crimes. (hrw.org)
  • impunity
  • The Taylor trial and judgment reflect a major departure from the impunity that heads of state have traditionally enjoyed when they are implicated in the gravest crimes. (hrw.org)
  • court
  • As for non-World War II related cases, the ICTY Appeals Chamber cited numerous decisions by Italian courts from 1960s to 1990s, decisions by the French Court of Cassation from 1947 and 1984, as well as jurisprudence in England, Wales, Canada, the United States, Australia, and Zambia. (hrw.org)
  • The U.S. is not a signatory to the war crimes court but an investigation would expose its forces to ICC scrutiny for the first time. (smbcgo.com)
  • Since the establishment of the ICC, the war crimes court has been accused of only targeting African leaders. (smbcgo.com)
  • Adding further support to the principle that no one should be above the law was the November 2011 transfer of Laurent Gbagbo, former president of Côte d'Ivoire, to the custody of the International Criminal Court (ICC) on charges of serious crimes committed during post-election violence in Côte d'Ivoire. (hrw.org)
  • victims
  • Permitting Ntaganda to move in and out of Rwanda without fear of arrest sends a message that Rwanda is not serious about helping deliver justice to victims of the war crimes he and his troops have committed," Van Woudenberg said. (hrw.org)
  • country's
  • A Gambian-born lawyer who is the International Criminal Court's chief prosecutor has suggested she may open an investigation into the US invasion of Afghanistan where war crimes might have been committed by the country's forces. (smbcgo.com)
  • Hague
  • Delivering her annual report to members of the ICC in The Hague on Monday, chief prosecutor Fatou Bensouda said she would decide "imminently" whether to ask judges for permission to launch a full-blown investigation as to whether US military forces and CIA operatives may have committed war crimes in Afghanistan through the "cruel or violent" interrogation of detainees. (smbcgo.com)
  • conflict
  • The alleged crimes were "not the abuses of a few isolated individuals" but were committed as part of "a policy or policies aimed at eliciting information through the use of interrogation techniques involving cruel or violent methods" the ICC reported, suggesting aim was to "support U.S. objectives in the conflict in Afghanistan. (smbcgo.com)
  • trials
  • In the aftermath of World War II, the courts established by British and U.S. occupying powers in Germany applied the doctrine in the trials against German Nazis. (hrw.org)
  • Trials of such leaders, accused of serious crimes committed in violation of international law, can be complex, lengthy, and fraught proceedings. (hrw.org)
  • troops
  • Bensouda said the Taliban, Afghan government forces and U.S. troops as well as the CIA all appeared to have carried out war crimes. (smbcgo.com)
  • forces
  • Meanwhile, the ICC the judge said there had been allegations of "war crimes of torture and related ill-treatment, by U.S. military forces deployed to Afghanistan and in secret detention facilities operated by the Central Intelligence Agency. (smbcgo.com)
  • Bensouda said there was a "reasonable basis to believe that" during the interrogation of detainees "members of the US armed forces and the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency resorted to techniques amounting to the commission of the war crimes of torture" as well as cruel treatment and rape. (smbcgo.com)
  • ICTY
  • The decision of July 15, 1999, by the ICTY Appeals Chamber in the Tadic case, gives a detailed account of post-World War II cases in which the doctrine was used, albeit under different term (common purpose doctrine) or under no specific name. (hrw.org)