• The purpose of this chapter is to describe the role of the vitreous in different types of mechanical trauma to the eyeball and the vitreous changes associated with these injuries. (springer.com)
  • Even though at SMHS Hospital 513 people have had vitrectomies, a procedure for removing vitreous humour (clear fluid filling the eyeball), hundreds are in line for the surgery. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Fibrous tissue connecting the ciliary body to the lens, holding it in place inside the eyeball. (ikonet.com)
  • Within the eye, versican interacts with other proteins to maintain the structure and gel-like consistency of the thick clear fluid that fills the eyeball (the vitreous). (medlineplus.gov)
  • The photosensitive part of the eye lies between the vitreous body and the choroid layer at the back of the eyeball and is a complex network of photosensitive cells and various types of neurons. (stereoscopy.com)
  • Sebag, J. and Balazs, E.A. (1985) Human vitreous fibers and vitreoretinal disease. (scirp.org)
  • This Public Health Statement is the summary chapter from the Toxicological Profile for Synthetic Vitreous Fibers . (cdc.gov)
  • This public health statement tells you about synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs) and the effects of exposure to them. (cdc.gov)
  • Synthetic vitreous fibers have not been detected in the 1,647 current or former NPL sites. (cdc.gov)
  • Although the total number of NPL sites evaluated for these substances is not known, the possibility exists that synthetic vitreous fibers may be found in the future as more sites are evaluated. (cdc.gov)
  • If you are exposed to synthetic vitreous fibers, many factors determine whether you'll be harmed. (cdc.gov)
  • 1.1 What are synthetic vitreous fibers? (cdc.gov)
  • Synthetic vitreous fibers are a group of fibrous inorganic materials that contain aluminum or calcium silicates and other trace oxides and metals, and are made from rock, slag, clay, or glass. (cdc.gov)
  • The randomly oriented molecular structure of synthetic vitreous fibers is called an amorphous structure. (cdc.gov)
  • There are two broad categories of synthetic vitreous fibers: filaments and wools. (cdc.gov)
  • The primary uses of synthetic vitreous fibers are for heat and sound insulating purposes, to reinforce other materials, and as filtration materials. (cdc.gov)
  • The production and use of synthetic vitreous fibers has increased in recent years because these products are often used as a replacement for asbestos. (cdc.gov)
  • 1.2 What happens to synthetic vitreous fibers when they enter the environment? (cdc.gov)
  • Synthetic vitreous fibers do not evaporate into air or dissolve in water. (cdc.gov)
  • Eventually, synthetic vitreous fibers will be broken down if the water or soil is very acidic or very alkaline. (cdc.gov)
  • The skin invasive larvae of Ancylostoma duodenale spread around the body via the blood stream and settle down inside muscle fibers in dormant condition. (medindia.net)
  • A beaded, dumbbell-shaped body formed when a macrophage engulfs asbestos fibers. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • These fibers give the eye the distinctive color that you can see from the exterior of the body. (studystack.com)
  • Quantitative gel electrophoresis and autoradiography based on 35 S-radiolabeling of basal-body complex proteins ( 12 ) and scanning transmission electron microscopy mass measurements of purified basal-body complexes ( 13 ) reveal that there are 26 (± ≈2) copies of each of the proteins comprising the L, P, and MS rings. (pnas.org)
  • Researchers believe that this imbalance of versican isoforms in the vitreous impairs versican's interaction with other proteins, causing the vitreous to become unstable. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The vitreous is the clear jelly of the eye and contains fine strands of proteins. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Overcoming the adhesion forces and actively navigating a swarm of micropropellers in the dense vitreous humor promise practical applications in ophthalmology. (sciencemag.org)
  • However, apart from these interesting studies, few research studies have evaluated the oxidative and antioxidant capacities and the energy status of body fluids in patients with glaucoma. (molvis.org)
  • A developmental ocular anomaly in which the primary VITREOUS BODY and its surrounding hyaloid vasculature failed to regress. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The spaces created by the separated layers are often filled with blisters and ruptured blood vessels that can leak blood into the vitreous body (the transparent, colorless mass of jelly-like material filling the center of the eye). (blindness.org)
  • Firm attachment sites: Along blood vessels and at sites of retinal degeneration Space of Martegioni: A funnel shaped space overlying the optic disc with condensed edge Cloquet's canal: A 1-2 mm wide canal within the vitreous, from the space of Martegioni to the space of Berger, along an S-shaped course mainly below the horizontal. (wikipedia.org)
  • His university friend Jan Swammerdam introduced him to the techniques of injections into the blood vessels of a dead body, which he was injecting with liquefied wax. (kunstkamera.ru)
  • Initial observations ( 8 , 9 ) of the cell-proximal end of the flagellum, the site of the motor, revealed an assembly, known as the basal-body complex, composed of several rings surrounding an axial structure. (pnas.org)
  • In one embodiment, perfluorooctylbromide is used as the radiopaque liquid to replace vitreous gel in irradiating an intraocular tumor. (google.com)
  • Bodies high in free quartz particles (by virtue of the percentage of silica in the recipe and not being too vitreous ) have the highest expansion. (digitalfire.com)
  • Vitreous porcelains (where the feldspar glass has dissolved much of the silica) and bodies made from low expansion minerals (like phyrophyillite, mullite) have the lowest expansions. (digitalfire.com)
  • Reduction in levels of iron and protein in the body lead to anemia and ascites, further progressing to emaciation and cardiac failure. (medindia.net)