Loading...
  • doses
  • To maintain blood levels of calcium, therapeutic vitamin D doses are sometimes administered (up to 100,000 IU or 2.5 mg daily) to patients who have had their parathyroid glands removed (most commonly kidney dialysis patients who have had tertiary hyperparathyroidism, but also to patients with primary hyperparathyroidism) or with hypoparathyroidism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with chronic liver disease or intestinal malabsorption disorders may also require larger doses of vitamin D (up to 40,000 IU or 1 mg (1000 micrograms) daily). (wikipedia.org)
  • amounts
  • People with a darker pigment of skin or increased amounts of melanin in their skin, may have decreased production of Vitamin D. Melanin absorbs ultraviolet B radiation from the sun and reduces vitamin D production. (wikipedia.org)
  • micrograms
  • In the United States, milk has been fortified with 10 micrograms (400 IU) of vitamin D per quart since the 1930s, leading to a dramatic decline in the number of rickets cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • rickets
  • Because the newly discovered substance was the fourth vitamin identified, it was called vitamin D. The 1928 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Adolf Windaus, who discovered the steroid 7-dehydrocholesterol, the precursor of vitamin D. Prior to the fortification of milk products with vitamin D, rickets was a major public health problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • sunlight
  • Ultraviolet B rays from sunlight is a large source of vitamin D. Salmon, herring, and mackerel, are also sources of Vitamin D. Milk is often fortified with vitamin D and sometimes bread, juices, and other dairy products are also fortified with vitamin D as well. (wikipedia.org)