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  • vertebrates
  • Fish and other vertebrates appear to have only three arrestins: no equivalent of arrestin-2, which is the most abundant non-visual subtype in mammals, was cloned so far. (wikipedia.org)
  • The thymus is the organ where T-cells-a principal component of the immune system in vertebrates-proceed through a strictly coordinated maturation process before being released into the bloodstream. (engineerdir.com)
  • compositions
  • Methods and compositions for detecting and localizing light originating from a mammal are disclosed. (google.com)
  • Disclosed herein are compositions and methods for repairing cell membranes. (patents.com)
  • In addition, the invention relates to therapeutic compositions comprising nucleotides and/or polypeptides of the invention in combination with a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier, wherein the composition facilitates the repair of cell membranes. (patents.com)
  • cellular
  • Chattopadhyay SK, Cloyd MW, Linemeyer DL, Lander MR, Rands E, Lowy DR (1982) Cellular origin and role of mink cell focus-forming viruses in murine thymic lymphomas. (springer.com)
  • 6. The method according to claim 1, wherein the cellular material is a morphologically preserved, intact cell. (google.com)
  • highly conserved
  • Hsp90 is highly conserved and expressed in a variety of different organisms from bacteria to mammals - including the prokaryotic analogue HtpG (high-temperature protein G) with 40% sequence identity and 55% similarity to the human protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • We find that loss of function in replication protein A (RPA), which consists of three highly conserved protein subunits and functions in DNA replication, leads to disintegration of the optic lobe neuroepithelium and premature differentiation of neuroepithelial cells into medulla neuroblasts. (jneurosci.org)
  • reproductive cells
  • Sexual reproduction, which involves the fusion of male and female reproductive cells (gametes) to create a zygote in a process called fertilization is, in contrast to asexual reproduction, the primary method of reproduction for the vast majority of macroscopic organisms, including almost all eukaryotes (which includes animals and plants). (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • These breaks can be caused by natural and medical radiation or other environmental exposures, but also occur when chromosomes exchange genetic material during a special type of cell division that creates sperm and eggs (meiosis). (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulation
  • Cell cycle regulation may be an important mechanism underlying the transition from proliferative to differentiative divisions of NE cells ( Dehay and Kennedy, 2007 ). (jneurosci.org)
  • Together with Lee Hartwell and Tim Hunt, Nurse won the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work on cell cycle regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • generate
  • In the Drosophila optic lobe, neuroepithelial cells first divide symmetrically to expand the stem cell population and then transform into asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts, which generate medulla neurons. (jneurosci.org)
  • divide
  • These cells maintain their shape by growing exclusively through the cell tips and divide by medial fission to produce two daughter cells of equal size, which makes them a powerful tool in cell cycle research. (wikipedia.org)
  • biologically
  • Apoptosis * ('programmed cell death') is a biologically ubiquitous phenomenon that deserves to be much more widely known among non-biologists and laypeople. (creation.com)
  • organelles
  • The evolution of photosynthesis, around 3.5 Ga, eventually led to a buildup of its waste product, oxygen, in the atmosphere, leading to the great oxygenation event, beginning around 2.4 Ga. The earliest evidence of eukaryotes (complex cells with organelles) dates from 1.85 Ga, and while they may have been present earlier, their diversification accelerated when they started using oxygen in their metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • widespread
  • Despite being widespread in the environment and causing medical and agricultural harm, virtually nothing is known about the host factors important to facilitate their growth and development inside of host cells. (g3journal.org)
  • addition
  • Among the ascomycetous yeast genera, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces is unique because of the deposition of α-(1,3)-glucan or pseudonigeran in the cell wall in addition to the better known β-glucans and the virtual lack of chitin. (wikipedia.org)
  • host
  • It is endemic in Eurasia and reportedly transmitted from rodents as the reservoir host to other mammals. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here, we perform a genetic screen to identify host transcription factors important for development of the microsporidian pathogen Nematocida parisii inside intestinal cells of its natural host, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans . (g3journal.org)
  • In non-dividing cells, these concatemers remain intact for the life of the host cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • methods
  • Also disclosed are methods for targeting light emission to selected regions, as well as for tracking entities within the mammal. (google.com)
  • Also the improvement of methods that require smaller amounts of cells has opened the possibility to use this approach on patient samples. (mdpi.com)
  • several
  • The total number of a particular plasmid within a cell is referred to as the copy number and can range from as few as two copies per cell to as many as several hundred copies per cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several procedures for the bulk preparation of age-synchronized yeast cells are available. (encyclopedia.com)
  • divisions
  • Aging is not typically measured by time in yeast, but rather by the number of divisions an individual cell completes before it dies. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The probability that a cell will continue dividing decreases exponentially as a function of the number of completed divisions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • surfaces
  • Selection directed to tumoral cells' surfaces lead to the identification of unknown tumoral markers. (mdpi.com)