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  • influenza virus
  • An example is the M1 protein of the influenza virus, showing affinity to the glycoproteins inserted in the host cell membrane on one side and affinity for the RNP complex molecules on the other side, which allows formation at the membrane of a complex made of the viral ribonucleoprotein at the inner side indirectly connected to the viral glycoproteins protruding from the membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • particles
  • In addition, the centrifugation step in shell viral culture enhances the sensitivity of this method because after centrifugation, the viral particles of the sample are in close proximity to the cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • A recent study based on comparisons of viral protein folding structures, however, is offering some new evidence. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mention to Viral Protein Structural Database (VPDB) have been removed because this resource displays data of poor quality: example http://vpdb.bicpu.edu.in/tabview.php?pdbid=1K4R This entry displays a dengue virus envelope protein but the source organism is HIV? (wikipedia.org)
  • I plan to edit this article by providing an overview of what a viral protein is. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recombinant viral vectors have also been used to deliver human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gene products, in conjunction with a protein boost using env-gp120 when searching for HIV vaccine, but results have been largely disappointing. (news-medical.net)
  • mutations
  • The rapidity of viral mutation also causes problems in the development of successful vaccines and antiviral drugs, as resistant mutations often appear within weeks or months after the beginning of a treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • virus
  • Viral antigens develop on the surface of cells infected with a specific virus. (webmd.com)
  • For example, a viral test may be done after a health professional is accidentally stuck with a needle containing contaminated blood to see if he or she became infected with the virus. (webmd.com)
  • Viral pneumonia is a pneumonia caused by a virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Viral disease is the sum of the effects on the host caused by the replication of the virus and of the host's subsequent immune response. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mechanisms of pathogenesis of viral diseases include: implantation of the virus at the portal of entry, local replication, spread to target organs, and shedding of the virus into the environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are several mechanisms that must occur for a viral disease to develop: Implantation at Portal of Entry: The virus must implant at the entry portal into the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Viral culture is a laboratory test in which samples are placed with a cell type that the virus being tested for is able to infect. (wikipedia.org)
  • Viral neuraminidase is a type of neuraminidase found on the surface of influenza viruses that enables the virus to be released from the host cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • A viral shift is the sudden emergence of a seemingly novel strain of a virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Douglas Rushkoff coined the term "media virus" or "viral media" and defined it as a type of Trojan horse: "People are duped into passing a hidden agenda while circulating compelling content. (wikipedia.org)
  • It employs a family of mathematical models that describe changes over time in the populations of cells targeted by the virus and the viral load. (wikipedia.org)
  • As viral synapses allow the virus to spread directly from cell to cell, they also provide a means by which the virus can escape neutralising antibody. (wikipedia.org)
  • Viral encephalitis is a type of encephalitis caused by a virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prior to budding, the virus may put its own receptor onto the surface of the cell in preparation for the virus to bud through, forming an envelope with the viral receptors already on it. (wikipedia.org)
  • They play a crucial role in virus assembly, and interact with the RNP complex as well as with the viral membrane . (wikipedia.org)
  • An endogenous viral element (EVE) is a DNA sequence derived from a virus, and present within the germline of a non-viral organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ancient DNA Avian sarcoma leukosis virus (ASLV) Endogenous retrovirus ERV3 HERV-FRD Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) Koala retrovirus (KoRV) Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) Murine leukemia virus (MLV), and xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) Paleovirology Polydnavirus Viral eukaryogenesis Taylor, D. J. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • Viral vectors can be applied in gene therapy in order to treat different diseases such as cancer, metabolic diseases, heart defects and neurodegenerative disorders. (news-medical.net)
  • structures
  • Viral neuraminidase cleaves terminal neuraminic acid (also called sialic acid) residues from glycan structures on the surface of the infected cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • patterns
  • Viral phenomena are objects or patterns that are able to replicate themselves or convert other objects into copies of themselves when these objects are exposed to them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Memes are possibly the best-known example of informational viral patterns. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • Viral pneumonia occurs in about 200 million people a year which includes about 100 million children and 100 million adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • chickenpox
  • A viral test may be done to see whether a person has developed immunity from having chickenpox or after getting the chickenpox vaccine . (webmd.com)
  • fever
  • Viral disease is usually detected by clinical presentation, for instance severe muscle and joint pains preceding fever, or skin rash and swollen lymph glands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Generally
  • Generally, a viral test does not cause pain or the pain goes away after the test. (webmd.com)
  • For these, the final identification method is generally by immunofluorescence, with exception of cytomegalovirus and rhinovirus, whose identification in a viral culture are determined by cytopathic effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzymes
  • In general, mammalian sialic acid residues are at terminal positions (non-reducing end) in complex glycans, and so viral neuraminidases - which are exo-glycosidase enzymes - use these terminal residues as their substrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • video
  • Totally Viral was a British comedy television programme, composed entirely of clips from video-sharing Internet websites such as YouTube. (wikipedia.org)
  • Video-sharing websites like YouTube made viral videos possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sony Pictures has released a new viral video for director Jose Padilha's upcoming RoboCop remake by way of a CES Keynote Presentation from OminCorp in the year 2027. (collider.com)
  • types
  • Many types of viral vectors have been used in a wide array of basic and clinical studies, and genetic tools made possible to construct novel viruses intended for gene therapy, but also the development of vaccines. (news-medical.net)
  • cell
  • Once replication has been completed and the host cell is exhausted of all resources in making viral progeny, the viruses may begin to leave the cell by several methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies have demonstrated that, when antigen-expressing viral vectors are used, the elicited T- and B-cell responses are both wider and of a greater order of magnitude than after DNA immunization alone. (news-medical.net)
  • A myriad of viral vaccine vectors can also induce apoptosis in the target cell. (news-medical.net)
  • causes
  • viral pneumonia" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary[dead link] National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, U.S.A. What Causes Pneumonia? (wikipedia.org)
  • content
  • In other words, I want people to clearly know that when I link from the word viral marketing, for instance, they're going to see content about viral marketing. (toprankblog.com)
  • usually
  • Most viral vectors are usually injected in blood, tumors or muscle tissue, but adenoviral and adeno-associated vectors can also be delivered via inhalation. (news-medical.net)
  • cellular
  • Viral synapse (or virological synapse) is a molecularly organized cellular junction that is similar in some aspects to immunological synapses. (wikipedia.org)
  • effective
  • Albeit viral-mediated gene delivery has shown to be the most effective way of gene transfer, non-viral means are also increasingly researched. (news-medical.net)
  • Any campaign that can achieve an objective of turning a film into an event, complete with a fully engaged online community nearly a full year in advance, is the very definition of an effective viral campaign. (toprankblog.com)
  • popularity
  • Viral media" is a common term whose popularity has been fueled by the rapid rise of social network sites alongside declining advertising rates and an extremely fragmented audience for broadcast media. (wikipedia.org)
  • The popularity and widespread distribution of Internet memes has gotten the attention of advertisers, creating the field of viral marketing. (wikipedia.org)