• V. vulnificus accounts for approximately eight percent of the aerobic bacteria in the Chesapeake Bay [ 5 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • Filter-feeding shellfish such as oysters concentrate bacteria and may have counts of V. vulnificus up to two orders of magnitude greater than those in the surrounding water. (uptodate.com)
  • Infection is diagnosed when Vibrio bacteria are found in the wound, blood, or stool (poop) of an ill person. (cdc.gov)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a species of Gram-negative, motile, curved rod-shaped (bacillus), pathogenic bacteria of the genus Vibrio. (wikipedia.org)
  • V. vulnificus bacteria can enter the body through open wounds when swimming or wading in infected waters, or by puncture wounds from the spines of fishes such as stingrays. (wikipedia.org)
  • Endotoxin: Like all gram negative bacteria, V. vulnificus has LPS (lipopolysaccharide as the major component of its outer membrane). (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron: Growth of V. vulnificus is dependent on the amount of iron that is accessible to the bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • V. vulnificus bacteria can enter the body through open wounds when swimming or wading in infected waters, [4] or by puncture wounds from the spines of fish such as stingrays . (wikipedia.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is responsible for a spate of infections and deaths in Florida, and medical experts say the bacteria is especially hard to detect and unusually quick to spread. (inquisitr.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus has hit this summer in a region already ravaged by a different bacteria. (inquisitr.com)
  • Flesh-eating bacteria Vibrio Vulnificus is starting to resurface in the Gulf and this man who just finished with his tattoo session wasn't too lucky. (inquisitr.com)
  • CNN reports that the flesh-eating bacteria called Vibrio Vulnificus has again caused another man his life. (inquisitr.com)
  • The unnamed man whose life was claimed by the flesh-eating bacteria called Vibrio Vulnificus was reported to have enjoyed a good swim in the Gulf of Mexico only five days after he got his tattoo. (inquisitr.com)
  • His condition continued to worsen within the month and in two months, Vibrio Vulnificus bacteria claims his life and he dies of septic shock. (inquisitr.com)
  • While the flesh-eating bacteria that is Vibrio Vulnificus is fairly rare, doctors believe that a lot of the cases tend to go unreported. (inquisitr.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus food poisoning occurs when you eat seafood infected with the bacteria or you have an open wound that is exposed to them. (uwhealth.org)
  • 4. The Vibrio bacteria is most potent during summer months, and most infections occur from May through October when water temperatures are warmer. (mysanantonio.com)
  • 2007. Vibrio vulnificus RTX toxin kills host cells only after contact of the bacteria with host cells. (kenyon.edu)
  • Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Vibrio vulnificus, Gram-negative, motile, curved rod-shaped bacteria (prokaryote). (sciencephoto.com)
  • Those V. vulnificus bacteria and phages that survive stomach acidity may proliferate in the small intestine, since they are resistant to bile. (nih.gov)
  • Vibrio Vulnificus is rare saltwater bacteria found in warm marine waters. (savingadvice.com)
  • Oliver JD (2005) Wound infection caused by Vibrio vulnificus and other marine bacteria. (springer.com)
  • Because the clinical symptoms and signs of necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis caused by these two bacteria are similar, the purposes of this study were to describe the clinical characteristics of Vibrio vulnificus and Aeromonas infections, to analyze the risk factors for death, and to compare the effects of surgical treatment on the outcome. (ebscohost.com)
  • Vibrio species' infections are a common sequelae to environmental stress or other disease processes in shrimp, but the mechanism by which the shrimp eliminate the bacteria is poorly understood. (stir.ac.uk)
  • The bacteria, Vibrio vulnificus , is not a new thing - it seems to show up in the Florida coasts annually and grows as the temperature rises - but it's already killed two people this year (and has infected seven), so things might be on track to be worse than usual. (bustle.com)
  • It may actually be difficult to tell how many people Vibrio vulnificus sickens per year because, in most people, the infection just shows up as vomiting, stomach cramps, and diarrhea - symptoms that aren't unique to the bacteria at all. (bustle.com)
  • Contrary to some sensationalist headlines, the bacteria isn't a 'flesh-eating' one, although it can cause skin ulcers if already-broken skin, like wounds, are exposed to seawater containing Vibrio vulnificus . (bustle.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus bacteria come from the same family that causes cholera, but these bacteria cause different illnesses, including sepsis and wound infections. (emedtv.com)
  • Although it comes from the same family as Vibrio cholerae (the bacteria that cause cholera ), the organism causes different illnesses. (emedtv.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is one of several types of Vibrio bacteria found in seawater. (nc.gov)
  • To better protect human health, estimates of non-consumption dose-response would be helpful in completing a quantitative microbial risk assessment to calculate relative risk of swimming in waters known to harbor Vibrio bacteria. (umd.edu)
  • Infections from Vibrio vulnificus are rare and typically affect people with pre-existing health conditions who had open cuts or sores when they came into contact with the bacteria. (gchd.org)
  • There is no testing program for Vibrio vulnificu s bacteria because it's naturally occurring in beach water. (gchd.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a bacteria that's naturally present in salt and brackish water around the world. (gchd.org)
  • Because Vibrio vulnificus occurs naturally in the same waters that oysters feed, the bacteria is ingested and becomes assimilated and concentrated in the animal's tissues. (theglobaldispatch.com)
  • Marine bivalves are exposed to different types of bacteria in the surrounding waters, in particular of the Vibrio genus. (ovid.com)
  • The virulence factors of V. vulnificus allow bacteria to survive acidic environments, evade the innate immune response and acquire nutrients from the environment. (mechpath.com)
  • Cholera, caused by the bacteria vibrio cholerae, may see increased incidence in the future as ocean temperatures rise. (wgntv.com)
  • Aug. 1, 2014 -- Summer is prime season for a bacteria called Vibrio vulnificus -- also known as "flesh-eating" bacteria -- to thrive, especially in warm Gulf Coast waters. (medicinenet.com)
  • Vibrio Vulnificus is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, isolated as a disease causing agent in 1976. (betterhealthfacts.com)
  • Vibriosis, the disease spawned from the Vibrio genus of bacteria, can be fatal. (listverse.com)
  • According to a story from Gulf Coast News Today , the woman, who was not named, contracted the bacteria Vibrio vulnificus after the fishing trip in June. (springfieldnewssun.com)
  • That's what happened in Florida this month after vibrio vulnificus bacteria spread over Henry Konietzky "like acid," according to his wife. (sterishoe.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus - sometimes incorrectly referred to as "flesh-eating bacteria" - is one of a family of 12 bacterial species that cause sickness in humans. (myfox8.com)
  • INTRODUCTION - Vibrio vulnificus is a gram-negative bacterium that can cause serious wound infections, septicemia, and diarrhea [ 1-3 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY - V. vulnificus exists as a free-living bacterium inhabiting estuarine (eg, saltwater marshes/wetlands, river estuaries) or marine environments. (uptodate.com)
  • V. vulnificus is an extremely virulent bacterium that can cause three types of infections: Acute gastroenteritis from eating raw or undercooked shellfish: V. vulnificus causes an infection often incurred after eating seafood, especially raw or undercooked oysters. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vibrio ("Beneckea") vulnificus , the bacterium associated with sepsis, septicemia, and the sea. (springer.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a gram-negative bacterium that can cause serious illness and death in persons with preexisting liver disease or compromised immune systems. (cdc.gov)
  • V. vulnificus, a free-living bacterium, occurs naturally in the marine environment, rather than as a result of pollution by human or animal fecal waste. (cdc.gov)
  • Vibrio is a naturally occurring bacterium found in warm, brackish seawater. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus food poisoning is caused by Vibrio vulnificus , a bacterium that lives in warm seawater. (uwhealth.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium that normally lives in warm seawater and is part of a group of vibrios that are called "halophilic" because they require salt. (visitflorida.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium in the same family as those that cause cholera. (southernnevadahealthdistrict.org)
  • Although oysters can be harvested legally only from waters free from fecal contamination, even legally harvested oysters can be contaminated with V. vulnificus because the bacterium is naturally present in marine environments. (southernnevadahealthdistrict.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a virulent, gram-negative, comma-shaped, motile bacterium that belongs to the family Vibrionaceae. (cdc.gov)
  • Because of its association with blistering skin infections, the bacterium was named Vibrio vulnificus in 1979. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition to septicemia, V. vulnificus can produce serious wound infections that typically result from exposure of open wounds to water harboring the bacterium ( 114 ). (asm.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a gram-negative bacterium that causes septicaemia and wound infection. (nih.gov)
  • A bacterial disease isolate from a shrimp farm was identified as V. vulnificus biotype I. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the bacterium and the specificity was verified by ELISA and immunoblot against a range of Vibrio spp. (stir.ac.uk)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium that is a rare cause of illness in the United States. (emedtv.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a gram negative bacterium, that is biochemically similar to Vibrio parahaemolyticus and is most often associated with food borne illness after eating raw or inadequately cooked seafood, especially raw oysters. (ehagroup.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium in the same family as those that cause cholera, normally lives in warm seawater and is part of a group of vibrios that are called "halophilic" because they require salt to survive. (spacecoastdaily.com)
  • The bacterium is frequently isolated from oysters and other shellfish in warm coastal waters during the summer months, and although Vibrio vulnificus can be present in any warm seawater or brackish water ways, the majority of cases have been reported in the gulf coast states. (spacecoastdaily.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium that is found in all coastal waters of the United States. (theglobaldispatch.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for the majority of seafood-associated deaths in the United States. (mechpath.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is often found in a place that's a perfect climate for the bacterium to grow and also possesses the large bodies of water which it likes to flourish in: Florida. (listverse.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is an estuarine bacterium that opportunistically infects humans with underlying hepatic diseases, heavy alcohol drinking habits, and other immunocompromised conditions. (ndsl.kr)
  • When his doctors performed urgent surgery, they isolated Vibrio vulnificus , a bacterium commonly found in coastal ocean water, as the cause of his infection. (myfox8.com)
  • Over 90 percent of patients with 'primary' V. vulnificus septicemia (ie, septicemia without an obvious source such as a wound) report having consumed raw oysters prior to the onset of illness [ 8 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus , a recently described strain of the halophilic Vibrio species, was isolated from the blood of a 73-year-old man, who developed rapidly progressive wound infection and fatal septicemia. (springer.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus most frequently causes primary septicemia and necrotising cellulitis after the eating of raw fish or shellfish or after exposure to seawater. (springer.com)
  • Fulminating Vibrio parahemolyticus septicemia. (springer.com)
  • Lactose-positive vibrio in seawater: A case of pneumonia and septicemia in a drowning victim. (springer.com)
  • Takeshita Z, Onizuka H, Yonezawa S, Muto M. A fetal case of Vibrio vulnificus septicemia. (springer.com)
  • The case-fatality rate from raw oyster-associated V. vulnificus septicemia among patients with pre-existing liver disease was 67% (30 of 45) compared with 38% (5 of 13) among those who were not known to have liver disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Ingestion of raw or undercooked shellfish contaminated with V. vulnificus can lead to primary septicemia or gastroenteritis. (cdc.gov)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic gram-negative rod widespread in the aquatic environment and associated with primary septicemia and severe wound infections. (diva-portal.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus Septicemia After Handling Tilapia Species Fish: A Canadian Case Report and Review. (nih.gov)
  • Finally, curcumin protected mice from V. vulnificus-induced septicemia. (ovid.com)
  • This primary septicemia is the most lethal infection caused by V. vulnificus , with an average mortality rate exceeding 50% ( 30 , 41 ). (asm.org)
  • Generally, only people with compromised immune systems, especially those with chronic liver disease, develop septicemia from Vibrio vulnificus . (pritzkerlaw.com)
  • Infection with Vibrio vulnificus can lead to development of necrotizing fasciitis and primary septicemia, and occurs mostly in immunocompromised host-associated diseases such as hepatic disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic renal insufficiency, and adrenal insufficiency. (springer.com)
  • Bullen JJ, Spalding PB, Ward CG et al (1991) Hemochromatosis, iron and septicemia caused by Vibrio vulnificus . (springer.com)
  • Background: Vibrio and Aeromonas species, which can cause necrotizing fasciitis and primary septicemia, are members of the Vibrionaceae family and thrive in aquatic environments. (ebscohost.com)
  • Infection with Vibrio vulnificus may cause complications such as septicemia in people with chronic liver disease, chronic alcoholism or hemochromatosis and those that are immunocompromised. (ehagroup.com)
  • Chronic kidney disease, including end-stage renal disease, has been identified as a possible risk factor for primary septicemia and wound infection by Vibrio vulnificus . (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, cases of severe septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis, and peritonitis caused by V. vulnificus in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) have not been described. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We report a case of severe septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis, and peritonitis due to V. vulnificus in a patient undergoing CAPD after ingesting raw seafood. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The main clinical manifestations of V. vulnificus infections are gastrointestinal illness, primary septicemia, and wound infections. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here, we report a case of severe septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis, and peritonitis due to V. vulnificus, which was identified by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequencing, in a patient undergoing CAPD after ingesting raw seafood. (biomedcentral.com)
  • If Vibrio Vulnificus enters the blood stream of a person with weak immune system then it is Invasive septicemia. (betterhealthfacts.com)
  • 1 Although reported cases of serious wound infection and potentially fatal septicemia caused by V vulnificus are abundant, 2 to our knowledge, this organism has been unreported in the ophthalmic literature and only a single corneal isolate has been identified previously by the Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus septicemia has a 20-50% mortality rate, depending on the source referenced. (medscape.com)
  • Park SD, Shon HS, Joh NJ: Vibrio vulnificus septicemia in Korea: clinical and epidemiological findings in seventy patients. (ndsl.kr)
  • V. vulnificus can be isolated from virtually all oysters harvested in the Chesapeake Bay and the United States Gulf Coast when water temperatures exceed 20ºC [ 5,7 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • You may have heard that you can get Vibrio infection from eating raw or undercooked oysters and other seafood. (cdc.gov)
  • Most Vibrio infections are caused by eating raw or undercooked oysters or other shellfish. (cdc.gov)
  • Based on the number of cases reported to the Florida HRS during 1981-1992, the annual rate of illness from V. vulnificus infection for adults with liver disease who ate raw oysters was 72 per 1 million adults -- 80 times the rate for adults without known liver disease who ate raw oysters (0.9 per 1 million). (cdc.gov)
  • The annual rate of death from V. vulnificus for adults with liver disease who ate raw oysters was 45 per 1 million -- more than 200 times greater than the rate for persons without known liver disease who ate raw oysters (0.2 per 1 million). (cdc.gov)
  • however, V. vulnificus is ubiquitous in warm ocean waters, and oysters harvested from approved sites may be contaminated. (cdc.gov)
  • V. vulnificus causes an infection often incurred after eating seafood , especially raw or undercooked oysters. (wikipedia.org)
  • People are also advised to stay away from consuming uncooked shellfish such as oysters, clams, and crabs since it is also a potent carrier of the Vibrio Vulnificus. (inquisitr.com)
  • People can get infected with Vibrio vulnificus when they eat raw shellfish, particularly oysters. (visitflorida.org)
  • Individuals with liver disease, including Hepatitis C and cirrhosis, are most at risk for developing serious illness from Vibrio vulnificus obtained from eating raw oysters. (visitflorida.org)
  • Persons who are immunocompromised, especially those with chronic liver disease, are at risk for V. vulnificus when they eat raw seafood, particularly oysters. (southernnevadahealthdistrict.org)
  • V. vulnificus does not alter the appearance, taste, or odor of oysters. (southernnevadahealthdistrict.org)
  • Consumption of seafood (primarily raw oysters) containing V. vulnificus can result in a severe, fulminant systemic infection. (asm.org)
  • The best way to prevent Vibrio vulnificus food poisoning is to not eat raw oysters or other raw shellfish and to cook all shellfish (oysters, clams, mussels) thoroughly. (parkviewmc.com)
  • Attorney Fred Pritzker recently won a wrongful death lawsuit for a family whose loved one died of Vibrio vulnificus after eating raw oysters at an oyster bar in Florida. (pritzkerlaw.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus does not change the taste or smell of oysters and other seafood, so you can't tell whether or not Vibrio vulnificus is present in raw seafood. (pritzkerlaw.com)
  • Of all concerns which face the shellfish industry, none are currently as critical as the presence of Vibrio vulnificus in oysters. (asm.org)
  • Katz BZ (1988) Vibrio vulnificus meningitis in a boy with thalassemia after eating raw oysters. (springer.com)
  • You can catch Vibrio vulnificus from eating uncooked seafood too, so for an extra layer of safety, order those oysters Rockefeller instead of sucking them down raw (still good, I promise). (bustle.com)
  • Oysters are filter-feeding bivalves, which filter water for nutrients and often accumulate contaminants and human pathogens such as Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus naturally occurring in the marine environment. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Human illness caused by consumption of raw oyster contaminated with V. parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus typically results in reduced sales of oysters and a consequent significant financial burden for the producers. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Several post-harvest processes, including low temperature pasteurization, freezing, high pressure processing and irradiation, have been reported capable of reducing Vibrio contamination in raw oysters. (oregonstate.edu)
  • This study was conducted to determine impacts of low-temperature (15, 10 and 5°C) depuration and frozen storage on reducing V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in raw oysters. (oregonstate.edu)
  • oxidation-reduction potential, 1,131mV) containing 3% NaCl was found ineffective on reducing both V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in the oysters. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Depuration with EO water at lower temperatures did not enhance reductions of Vibrio in the oysters. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Greater reductions of V. parahaemolyticus (1.2 log MPN/g) and V. vulnificus (2.0 log MPN/g) were observed when the oysters were depurated with artificial seawater (ASW) at room temperature (22°C) for 48 h. (oregonstate.edu)
  • However, depuration of oyster in ASW at 10 and 5°C were found less effective than at 15°C in reducing Vibrio in the Gulf oysters. (oregonstate.edu)
  • An extended depuration with ASW at 15°C for 96 h was capable of achieving 2.6 and 3.3 log MPN/g of reductions of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, respectively, in the Gulf oysters. (oregonstate.edu)
  • This dissertation studied V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus at locations in Chesapeake Bay where human contact is likely, in order to quantify dermal transmission to humans, describe the impact of storms on pathogen concentrations in oysters, and quantify antimicrobial resistance. (umd.edu)
  • Results indicated no difference in Vibrio uptake between oysters positioned on floats and on bottom sediments, but showed a difference in Vibrio species uptake, with V. parahaemolyticus increasing 1 day post-Irene, unlike V. vulnificus. (umd.edu)
  • This study suggests that storm events may increase V. parahaemolyticus in oyster tissue, and that virulent sub-types of both Vibrio species may increase in percent abundance within oysters following a storm event. (umd.edu)
  • Here, a multicoastal, 21-month study was conducted to determine relationships between environmental parameters and V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus populations in water, oysters, and sediment in three coastal areas of the United States. (eurekamag.com)
  • Ha, Sang-Do 2018-05-01 00:00:00 This study investigated the synergistic bactericidal effects of treatment with a combination of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and gamma irradiation against Vibrio vulnificus on shucked oysters and clams. (deepdyve.com)
  • The V. vulnificus population decreased to 1.1-4.8 and 1.2-4.8 log10 colony forming units/g in oysters and clams, respectively, after treatment with a combination of NaOCl (20-80 ppm) and gamma irradiation (0.1-2.0 kGy). (deepdyve.com)
  • Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio vulnificus are one of the critical foodborne pathogens that need to be intensively controlled their infection as a result of the intake and distribution of seafood, especially raw oysters. (researchsquare.com)
  • This advanced MPN-PCR method was verified using bioaccumulated pacific oysters ( Crassostrea gigas ) by V. cholerae and V. vulnificus . (researchsquare.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus isolates were recovered from oysters and genotyped as 16S type A, B or AB by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (ALFP) analyses. (auburn.edu)
  • Vibrio Vulnificus Infection mostly occurs in marine environment or by eating sea food, especially shellfish or oysters. (betterhealthfacts.com)
  • Risk assessment of Vibrio vulnificus in raw oysters : interpretative summary and technical report. (who.int)
  • The disease cholera, caused by 'epidemic' strains of Vibrio cholerae , infections caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus , and illnesses associated with other Vibrio strains and species are discussed separately. (uptodate.com)
  • See 'Overview of cholera' and 'Vibrio parahaemolyticus infections' and 'Infections due to non-O1/O139 Vibrio cholerae' . (uptodate.com)
  • Present in marine environments such as estuaries, brackish ponds, or coastal areas, V. vulnificus is related to V. cholerae, the causative agent of cholera. (wikipedia.org)
  • This detection method is based on the difference in salt requirement between V. cholerae and V. vulnificus . (researchsquare.com)
  • Employing the developed methodology, the simultaneous cell enumeration of V. cholerae and V. vulnificus can be possible at a low cost. (researchsquare.com)
  • Furthermore, this study proposes a new specific primer to detect virulence-related genes from V. cholerae and V. vulnificus . (researchsquare.com)
  • Miller VL, Mekalanos JJ: A novel suicide vector and its use in construction of insertion mutations: osmoregulation of outer membrane proteins and virulence determinants in Vibrio cholerae requires toxR. (ndsl.kr)
  • The most harmful strains of V. vulnificus documented have been observed in three different forms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strains of V. vulnificus are classified into biotypes based on their biochemical characteristics. (asm.org)
  • Furthermore, the use of multilocus sequence typing indicated similar results and divided strains of V. vulnificus into genetic lineages ( 24 ). (asm.org)
  • therefore, it was suggested that V. vulnificus strains possessing this island also possess an increased potential for virulence ( 24 ). (asm.org)
  • Survival of three strains of Vibrio vulnificus and three strains of its phages was examined at 37 degrees C after exposure to simulated gastric fluid at pH 3 to 4 or to 0, 1, and 2% bile in broth or buffer. (nih.gov)
  • There were few survival differences among strains of V. vulnificus or its phages. (nih.gov)
  • Most V. vulnificus strains express capsular polysaccharide (CPS), which is required for the virulence of this organism. (asm.org)
  • Biochemically, the isolates showed properties similar to those described previously for eel-pathogenic strains of V, vulnificus, with the exception of indole production. (dtu.dk)
  • The results indicate that mussel hemocytes can mount an efficient immune response towards V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus strains, whereas V. vulnificus 509 may affect the hemocyte function. (ovid.com)
  • These data reinforce the hypothesis that Mytilus hemocytes show specific responses to different vibrio species and strains. (ovid.com)
  • A Pentaplex PCR (pPCR) assay condition was developed with a combination of two species- and three pathogenic- specific PCR primer sets to simultaneously detect and characterize bacterial isolates for virulent/ non- virulent strains of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. (lsu.edu)
  • First pPCR was tested on 300 bacterial isolates comprising of 7 reference strains, 117 V. vulnificus, 30 V. parahaemolyticus and 146 unknown bacterial species and results were compared with other reported PCR reactions. (lsu.edu)
  • Infection with V. vulnificus leads to rapidly expanding cellulitis or sepsis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first successful documented treatment of fulminant V. vulnificus sepsis was in 1995. (wikipedia.org)
  • A comprehensive review of Vibrio vulnificus: an important cause of severe sepsis and skin and soft-tissue infection. (kenyon.edu)
  • A fatal case of V vulnificus sepsis that developed in a patient with chronic hepatitis B and chronic renal failure is reported. (nih.gov)
  • The present case highlights the need to consider V vulnificus in the microbiological differential diagnosis when a person presents with sepsis and bullous cutaneous lesions. (nih.gov)
  • Characteristic bullous skin lesions of Vibrio vulnificus sepsis. (nih.gov)
  • Clinical manifestations and outcomes were retrospectively analyzed for 67 patients with V. vulnificus -mediated necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis. (springer.com)
  • Tsai YH, Hsu WW, Huang KC et al (2004) Systemic vibrio infection presenting as necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis: a series of thirteen cases. (springer.com)
  • Methods: The cases of thirty-two patients with necrotizing soft-tissue infections and sepsis caused by Vibrio vulnificus (seventeen patients) and Aeromonas species (fifteen patients) were retrospectively reviewed over a four-year period. (ebscohost.com)
  • Sepsis with Bullous Necrotizing Skin Lesions due to Vibrio vulnificus Acquired Through Recreational Activities in the Baltic Sea. (ebscohost.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus infection can result in necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis and is associated with high mortality. (ebscohost.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is known to cause two different illnesses: sepsis and wound infections. (emedtv.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus typically causes sepsis. (emedtv.com)
  • One species, Vibrio vulnificus , can cause life-threatening wound infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Hollis DG, Weaver RE, Baker CN, Thornsberry C. Halophilic vibrio species isolated from blood cultures. (springer.com)
  • 2. There are about a dozen Vibrio species know to cause vibriosis in humans. (mysanantonio.com)
  • 3. The exact Vibrio species that causes vibriosis naturally lives in warm, coastal salt water . (mysanantonio.com)
  • In 2007, infections caused by Vibrio vulnificus and other vibrio species became nationally notifiable. (visitflorida.org)
  • Conclusions: The contact history of patients with a rapid onset of cellulitis can alert clinicians to a differential diagnosis of soft-tissue infection with Vibrio vulnificus (contact with seawater or raw seafood) or Aeromonas species (contact with fresh or brackish water, soil, or wood). (ebscohost.com)
  • Then, we designed a DNA-microarray that was used to analyze the early immune response against Vibrio vulnificus, a septicemic pathogen that uses the gills as the portal of entry into the blood, as well as the role of the main toxin of this species (RtxA13) on this early interaction. (altmetric.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) is a multi-host pathogenic species currently subdivided into three biotypes (Bts). (altmetric.com)
  • V. vulnificus (Vv), a species associated with shellfish and occurring in the US Southeast, has ranges of temperature (16-33 °C) and salinity (5-20 ppt) dependencies for optimal growth. (x-mol.com)
  • The most serious marine infections, while rare, result from infection with Vibrio and Aeromonas species. (medscape.com)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, which are native to estuaries globally, are agents of seafood-borne or wound infections, both potentially fatal. (eurekamag.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus produces human disease associated with raw-oyster consumption or wound infections, but fatalities are limited to persons with chronic underlying illness. (asm.org)
  • At least one strain of V. vulnificus is bioluminescent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Suppression subtractive hybridization was used to identify differentially expressed genes among cDNAs of the VBNC suppression mutant and the wild-type Vibrio vulnificus strain. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • The cause of the outbreak was a new strain of V. vulnificus, classified as biogroup 3. (nih.gov)
  • Seven antimicrobial agents, all effective against Vibrio vulnificus in vitro, were compared for in vivo efficacy in mice experimentally infected with V. vulnificus strain B3547. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Furthermore, significant differences in the immune response against the wild type and the mutant strain also suggest that host survival after V. vulnificus infection could depend on an efficient local phagocytic activity. (altmetric.com)
  • An insertional mutation of vvgS in a V. vulnificus strain led to a remarkable decrease of cytotoxicity to HeLa cells, while the production of exotoxins, the hemolysin and the protease, slightly increased by the vvgS mutation. (ndsl.kr)
  • In addition, V. vulnificus can cause infection by directly contaminating open wounds during swimming, shellfish cleaning, and other marine activities. (cdc.gov)
  • While V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus cause shellfish-associated morbidity and mortality among shellfish consumers, current regulatory assays for vibrios are complex, time-consuming, labor-intensive, and relatively expensive. (asm.org)
  • V. vulnificus is part of the normal bacterial flora of estuarine waters and occurs in high numbers in molluscan shellfish. (asm.org)
  • These results indicate treating V. vulnificus populations 5 logs in size with a combination of 60 or 80 ppm NaOCl and 0.9-1.1 kGy gamma irradiation could be a strategy used in post-harvest processing of seafood and distribution to enhance the microbial safety of molluscan shellfish. (deepdyve.com)
  • Most V vulnificus infections occur in coastal states during the warm months in association with the ingestion or handling of shellfish. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Since it is naturally found in warm marine waters, people with open wounds can be exposed to V. vulnificus through direct contact with seawater. (southernnevadahealthdistrict.org)
  • From the Latin vibrio (to move) and vulnificus (causing wounds). (cdc.gov)
  • V. vulnificus thrives in warm, medium salinity water and causes infections either through the ingestion of contaminated seafood or in this case, through open wounds that come in contact with V. vulnificus contaminated water[3]. (kenyon.edu)
  • Vibrio vulnificus can also enter the body through open wounds when swimming or wading, or via puncture wounds from the spines of fish such as tilapia. (sciencephoto.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus can also infect wounds sustained while in contact with coastal or estuarine waters (boating accidents, fisherman oyster shuckers) and can range from mild, self limited lesions to rapidly progressive cellulites and myositis. (ehagroup.com)
  • Handling contaminated seafood and exposing wounds to water containing V. vulnificus can cause skin infections. (mechpath.com)
  • People with open wounds can be exposed to Vibrio vulnificus through direct contact with seawater. (springfieldnewssun.com)
  • Role of iron in the pathogenesis of Vibrio vulnificus infections. (springer.com)
  • 2009. Vibrio vulnificus: disease and pathogenesis. (kenyon.edu)
  • The pathogenesis of V. vulnificus has been reviewed ( 14 , 54 ), and disease symptoms resemble endotoxic shock. (asm.org)
  • Symptoms of V. vulnificus infection ( vibriosis ) include vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. (pritzkerlaw.com)
  • Dr. Stone joined me to discuss Vibriosis caused by Vibrio vulnificus and the effects of warming seawaters on it's presence in more parts of the world. (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • A total of 45 cases of Vibrio vulnificus were reported during 2015 resulting in 14 deaths. (visitflorida.org)
  • More than 10 million people visited Texas beaches in 2015 and 35 cases of Vibrio vulnificus were reported. (gchd.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a free living organism found in marine waters. (ehagroup.com)
  • applications in analyzing the genomes of Corynebacterium glutamicum and Vibrio vulnificus CMCP6 chromosome I'. Bioinformatics. (edwardbetts.com)
  • An analysis of one of the published V. vulnificus genomes (CMCP6) showed that one gene required for CPS expression, wzb , is flanked on either side by a series of direct repeats ( 14 ). (asm.org)
  • What are the signs and symptoms of Vibrio vulnificus infection? (cdc.gov)
  • Symptoms of Vibrio Vulnificus Infection are different for different types of Vibrio Vulnificus Infection. (betterhealthfacts.com)
  • Vibrio Vulnificus is a bacterial microorganism that's from the same family as the type that causes cholera. (inquisitr.com)
  • To further examine the inhibitory mechanism of curcumin against V. vulnificus-mediated cytotoxicity, the level of bacterial growth, bacterial motility, cell adhesion, RTX toxin expression and host cell reactions were evaluated. (ovid.com)
  • Curcumin inhibited both bacterial adhesion and RTX toxin binding to the host cells, which can be considered the major protective mechanisms for the decrease in V. vulnificus cytotoxicity. (ovid.com)
  • One of the few experimentally proven virulence factors for V. vulnificus is the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) expressed on the surface of the bacterial cell. (asm.org)
  • In this study we determined the effect of refrigeration on the total bacterial, total Vibrio spp. (auburn.edu)
  • The number of cases of the potentially deadly bacterial infection from Vibrio vulnificus stands at 26 across the state, according to a WESH.com report Friday . (theglobaldispatch.com)
  • Here in the state of Florida, dozens of confirmed cases of the bacterial infection caused by Vibrio vulnificus occur annually, along with dozens more in the other Gulf states. (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • A locus in the V. vulnificus genome was cloned and sequenced, which showed similarities to the bacterial two-component signal transduction system. (ndsl.kr)
  • From 1981 through 1992, 125 persons with V. vulnificus infections, of whom 44 (35%) died, were reported to the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS). (cdc.gov)
  • These estimates were used in conjunction with case reports and population data from the Florida Office of Vital Statistics to estimate the risk for illness and death associated with V. vulnificus (1). (cdc.gov)
  • The Florida Department of Health has reported eight confirmed Vibrio vulnificus infections, including two deaths, so far this year. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Before 2007, there was no national surveillance system for Vibrio vulnificus , but CDC collaborated with Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Texas and Mississippi to monitor the number of cases in the Gulf Coast region. (visitflorida.org)
  • As usual, immune-compromised persons are more susceptible to catching a Vibrio vulnificus infection, as are those with chronic liver disease, so maybe leave your Florida-dwelling grandma safely on the sand while you take a dip. (bustle.com)
  • BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA - The Florida Department of Health in Brevard County (DOH- Brevard) urges Floridians and visitors to the area to take precautions to avoid exposure to Vibrio vulnificus . (spacecoastdaily.com)
  • Below is a Q&A from the Florida Department of Health that answers some common questions about Vibrio and offers some tips on avoiding an infection. (springfieldnewssun.com)
  • According to Diane Holm , a spokeswoman for the Florida state health department in Lee County, nine people died from vibrio vulnificus in the state last year, and 13 died in 2011, so the statistics aren't terribly alarming. (sterishoe.com)
  • V. vulnificus is 80 times more likely to spread into the bloodstream in people with compromised immune systems, especially those with chronic liver disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The findings in this report are consistent with other studies indicating that persons with liver disease are at increased risk for infection with V. vulnificus and death (2,4). (cdc.gov)
  • Key to the diagnosis and treatment were the early recognition of bullae in an immunocompromised person with liver cirrhosis and oyster ingestion within the previous 48 hours, and the request by the physician for STAT Gram staining and blood cultures for V. vulnificus . (wikipedia.org)
  • The man who died from the Vibrio Vulnificus was reported to have liver disease, as well. (inquisitr.com)
  • Dr. Penico reiterates that people with strong immune systems will be strong enough to fight the infection but those with underlying hepatitis, sorosis, diabetes, or weak liver from drinking too much alcohol are very susceptible to the risk that the Vibrio Vulnificus poses. (inquisitr.com)
  • The latter are clearly associated with V. vulnificus infection, with liver diseases, such as cirrhosis or hepatitis, being the most common ( 116 ). (asm.org)
  • Hor LI, Chang TT, Wang ST (1999) Survival of Vibrio vulnificus in whole blood from patients with chronic liver diseases: association with phagocytosis by neutrophils and serum ferritin levels. (springer.com)
  • We present a case of Vibrio vulnificus septic shock and cellulitis in a patient with chronic liver disease that occurred after obtaining a leg tattoo with subsequent seawater exposure in the Gulf of Mexico. (bmj.com)
  • This case highlights the association of chronic liver disease and high mortality associated with infections of V. vulnificus . (bmj.com)
  • Health providers should remain vigilant for V. vulnificus infections in patients with chronic liver disease and raw oyster ingestion or seawater exposure. (bmj.com)
  • Infection with Vibrio vulnificus, a halophilic Gram-negative bacillus found worldwide in warm coastal waters, can lead to severe complications, particularly among patients with chronic liver. (ebscohost.com)
  • People with diabetes, liver disease, cancer or other immune suppressing conditions who swim in untreated water with open cuts or sores are at an increased risk for Vibrio vulnificus . (gchd.org)
  • People with weak immune system or chronic liver disease are more prone to Vibrio Vulnificus Infection. (betterhealthfacts.com)
  • Kizer, KW 1994, ' Vibrio vulnificus hazard in patients with liver disease ', Western Journal of Medicine , vol. 161, no. 1, pp. 64-65. (elsevier.com)
  • however, Vibrio vulnificus infections can be a serious concern for people who have weakened immune systems, particularly those with chronic liver disease. (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • Background: Vibrio vulnificus causes necrotizing fasciitis and liver dysfunction. (imedpub.com)
  • Season-Specific Occurrence of Potentially Pathogenic Vibrio spp. (asm.org)
  • The recent emergence of the human-pathogenic Vibrio vulnificus in Israel was investigated by using multilocus genotype data and modern molecular evolutionary analysis tools. (cdc.gov)
  • SST and suspended particulate matter were found to be strong predictors of total and potentially pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. (eurekamag.com)
  • Three biotypes with identical genotypes of pathogenic V. vulnificus have been identified and classified according to their biochemistry. (mechpath.com)
  • Developed by scientists at Mississippi State University and the FDA, the test method uses separate 96-well plates with a unique combination of selective ingredients and two--phase culture (solid phase culture and liquid phase enrichment broth) - one plate for V. vulnificus , one plate for pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus , and one plate for total V. parahaemolyticus . (secure-food-solutions.com)
  • There has been an increase in Vibrio outbreaks and presence in seafood has been known to disrupt trade, according to FAO and WHO. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • It should be noted that Vibrio Vulnificus is not only contactable in the Gulf or in Gulf seafood. (inquisitr.com)
  • V. vulnificus can cause disease in those who eat eat contaminated seafood or have an open wound that is exposed to seawater. (southernnevadahealthdistrict.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is an opportunistic human pathogen that is highly lethal and is responsible for the overwhelming majority of reported seafood-related deaths in the United States ( 30 , 117 ). (asm.org)
  • You may have a Vibrio Vulnificus lawsuit if you or a loved one was sickened after eating tainted seafood at a restaurant. (pritzkerlaw.com)
  • All patients who had contacted seawater or raw seafood with positive culture for vibrio were included. (springer.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus infection is the leading cause of death related to seafood consumption in the United States. (ebscohost.com)
  • The incubation period for Vibrio vulnificus is usually between 12 - 72 hours after consuming raw or undercooked seafood. (ehagroup.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus can cause disease in those who eat contaminated seafood or expose an open wound to warm, brackish seawater. (spacecoastdaily.com)
  • Suspicion of V. vulnificus infection in vulnerable patients who ingest raw seafood is essential for prompt diagnosis, which could significantly improve patient outcomes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The presence of V. vulnificus does not affect the taste or odor of contaminated seafood, making detection challenging. (mechpath.com)
  • What are some tips for preventing Vibrio vulnificus infections from raw seafood? (springfieldnewssun.com)
  • Who is at a higher risk of infection with Vibrio vulnificus? (ehagroup.com)
  • In one report, a fish farm hatchery manager with diabetes mellitus and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis developed V. vulnificus necrotizing fasciitis following acupuncture, presumably in the setting of skin contamination [ 12 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • Some Vibrio vulnificus infections lead to necrotizing fasciitis , a severe infection in which the flesh around an open wound dies. (cdc.gov)
  • Presentations of skin damage of vibrio necrotizing fasciitis including A. swelling and vein dilation, B. bruising, C. blistering, and D. tissue necrosis. (kenyon.edu)
  • Vibrio vulnificus necrotizing fasciitis associated with acupuncture. (ebscohost.com)
  • She underwent emergency fasciotomy on the suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis by V. vulnificus infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • On February 7, 2017, the Hong Kong Centre for Health Protection (CHP) recorded a sporadic case of necrotizing fasciitis due to Vibrio vulnificus infection affecting a 75-year-old male with underlying illnesses. (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • In healthy people, Vibrio vulnificus food poisoning can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal (belly) pain. (uwhealth.org)
  • How is Vibrio vulnificus food poisoning diagnosed? (uwhealth.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus food poisoning is diagnosed based on a medical history and a physical exam. (uwhealth.org)
  • You treat Vibrio vulnificus food poisoning by managing complications until it passes. (uwhealth.org)
  • How can I prevent Vibrio vulnificus food poisoning? (uwhealth.org)
  • ICD-9 code 005.81 for Food poisoning due to vibrio vulnificus is a medical classification as listed by WHO under the range -INTESTINAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES (001-009). (aapc.com)
  • How is Vibrio vulnificus food poisoning treated? (parkviewmc.com)
  • What are the treatment options for Vibrio vulnificus food poisoning? (sharecare.com)
  • It is important to quickly treat Vibrio vulnificus food poisoning with one or more appropriate antibiotics. (sharecare.com)
  • Between 1988 and 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) received reports of more than 900 Vibrio vulnificus infections from the Gulf Coast states, where most cases occur. (visitflorida.org)
  • Among healthy people, ingestion of V. vulnificus can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • In people with a healthy immune system, Vibrio Vulnificus causes vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. (inquisitr.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is mainly implicated in gastrointestinal illness characterized by vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. (ehagroup.com)
  • Home Resources Pathogens Expert Consulting: What is Vibrio vulnificus? (ehagroup.com)
  • However, there are many pathogens in our waters, such as Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus, and it remains unclear how well fecal indicator surveillance protects the public from infection. (umd.edu)
  • The aim of the study was to develop an effective multiplex PCR protocol for simultaneous, rapid detection and characterization of two potential pathogens, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus and to enumerate their abundance in the environment. (lsu.edu)
  • Virulence of Vibrio vulnificus has been strongly associated with encapsulation and an opaque colony morphology. (asm.org)
  • Symptoms of Vibrio vulnificus in wound infections typically include swelling, pain and redness at the wound site. (visitflorida.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus, an opportunistic human pathogen, secretes the 50 kDa single-chain hemolysin. (elsevier.com)
  • This report describes the case of a 59-year-old woman with a history of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who developed bacteremia with Vibrio vulnificus. (ebscohost.com)
  • Both blood cultures revealed Vibrio vulnificus , which suggested the possible correlation of CT-finding and bacteremia. (escholarship.org)
  • While reasons for these increases have yet to be determined, it has been noted that outbreaks of V. vulnificus disease in Israel are associated with record high temperatures ( 124 ). (asm.org)
  • Clinical, epidemiological, and microbiological features of Vibrio vulnificus biogroup 3 causing outbreaks of wound infection and bacteraemia in Isr. (nih.gov)
  • Vibrio vulnificus was isolated in 1996 from 2 disease outbreaks on a Danish eel farm which used brackish water. (dtu.dk)
  • Incidences of V. vulnificus generally occur as isolated cases, although outbreaks affecting multiple states have been reported. (mechpath.com)
  • If ingested, Vibrio Vulnificus can cause stomach pain, diarrhea and vomiting. (savingadvice.com)
  • Clinicians should therefore consider the possibility of Vibrio vulnificus infection in the differential diagnosis of severe wound infections. (springer.com)
  • Cinci persoane expuse la apa şi fructele de mare din Golful Delaware (SUA, East Coast), au prezentat cazuri severe de fasceită necrozantă - infecţie cauzată de "Vibrio vulnificus", o bacterie ce distruge pielea şi ţesuturile moi de sub ea. (cronicamedicala.ro)
  • Although there is no national surveillance for infections caused by this pathogen, regional surveillance in four states along the Gulf Coast indicates an annual incidence for V. vulnificus infections of at least 0.6 per 1 million persons and a case-fatality rate of 22% (3). (cdc.gov)
  • Vibrio Vulnificus can be both foodborne and waterborne. (inquisitr.com)
  • ICD-10 A05.5 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of foodborne vibrio vulnificus intoxication. (icdlist.com)
  • Occurring naturally in the warm coastal waters, particularly during the summer months, Vibrio vulnificus has the potential to cause serious illness. (visitflorida.org)
  • Exotoxin: V. vulnificus produces a number of extracellular toxins such as metalloprotease VvpE, cytolysin/hemolysin VvhA, and the multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxins (MARTX) toxin. (wikipedia.org)
  • A few mechanisms of V. vulnificus cytotoxicity resulting in tissue damage have been studied in mice, including the toxins VvTtxA, hemolysin (Vvha), and VvpE. (kenyon.edu)
  • Molecular methods were used to detect genes for thermolabile hemolysin (tlh), thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), and tdh-related hemolysin (trh) as indicators of V. parahaemolyticus and the hemolysin gene vvhA for V. vulnificus. (eurekamag.com)
  • These results suggest that V. vulnificus hemolysin is modified to be a more hydrophilic protein by nicking, while it is not accompanied by loss of the hemolytic activity. (elsevier.com)
  • The action of Vibrio vulnificus hemolysin (VVH), a cholesterol-binding hemolysin, on cholesterol-liposome suspensions was studied. (elsevier.com)
  • These results indicate that vvgRS two-component system plays a very important role in regulating novel virulence factor(s) of V. vulnificus associated with cytotoxicity other than hemolysin and protease during the infection process. (ndsl.kr)
  • Morris JG Jr, Wright AC, Roberts DM, Wood PK, Simpson LM, Oliver JD: Identification of environmental Vibrio vulnificus isolates with a DNA probe for the cytotoxin-hemolysin gene. (ndsl.kr)
  • 2007. Identification and characterization of the Vibrio vulnificus rtxA essential for cytotoxicity in vitro and virulence in mice. (kenyon.edu)
  • Cell-to-cell contact with the host is required for cytotoxicity (Figure 2) and V. vulnificus knows when to release its toxins using quorum sensing [9]. (kenyon.edu)
  • The cytotoxicity of V. vulnificus to HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by curcumin (at 10 or 30 μM). (ovid.com)
  • Baethge BA, West BC (1988) Vibrio vulnificus: did Hippocrates describe a fatal case? (springer.com)
  • In 1976, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control identified it as a Vibrio sp. (cdc.gov)
  • However, two distinct V. vulnificus genotypes or alleles were associated with the operon, and they diverged at sequences encoding hypothetical proteins and also at unique, intergenic repetitive DNA elements. (asm.org)
  • This is actually avoided in V. vulnificus because of the polysaccharide capsule which does not allow these proteins to bind, thus avoiding being taken up by macrophages (immune cells) (Figure 2). (mechpath.com)
  • 2013. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of Vibrio vulnificus infection: a retrospective study of 12 cases. (kenyon.edu)
  • We conclude that early and appropriate diagnosis for V. vulnificus infection should be made, especially in patients presenting with atypical clinical findings. (springer.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus Infection: Diagnosis and Treatment. (ebscohost.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a natural inhabitant of warm, coastal waters. (emedtv.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic, pleomorphic, gram-negative rod that is ubiquitous in marine waters. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Forty-six people contracted Vibrio vulnificus in the waters off Florida's coast in 2016, with 10 of those people dying within days of being infected. (springfieldnewssun.com)
  • Our findings showed higher occurrence of V. vulnificus (~ 49%) than that of V. parahaemolyticus (~ 12 %) and their prevalences were influenced by temperature and salinity in the Gulf waters. (lsu.edu)
  • Disease caused by a marine vibrio. (springer.com)
  • Persons with compromised immune systems (e.g., chronic renal insufficiency, cancer, diabetes, steroid-dependent asthma, and chronic intestinal disease) or iron overload states (e.g., thalassemia and hemochromatosis) may also be at increased risk for infection with V. vulnificus and death (2,5). (cdc.gov)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a rare cause of disease, but it is also underreported. (visitflorida.org)
  • The CDC reported Vibrio infections increased by 78% between 1996 and 2006, and in 2005, 121 cases of V. vulnificus disease were confirmed ( 14 , 15 ). (asm.org)
  • Vibrio vulnificus causes both food-borne disease and wound infections. (asm.org)
  • Blake PA, Merson MH, Weaver RE et al (1979) Disease caused by a marine Vibrio: clinical characteristics and epidermiology. (springer.com)
  • Paz S, Bisharat N, Paz E et al (2007) Climate change and the emergence of Vibrio vulnificus disease in Israel. (springer.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) receives reports of more than 400 Vibrio illnesses each year. (emedtv.com)
  • Pre-existing renal disease has been especially regarded as a risk factor for V. vulnificus infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • My guest, Infectious Disease specialist, a Forbes contributor, Judy Stone, MD said in a recent piece, "Infections from Vibrio vulnificus are a summer staple, and are increasing along with global warming. (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • Vibrio vulnificus is a rare cause of disease, but it is also under reported. (springfieldnewssun.com)
  • Hurricanes, storm surges, and coastal flooding have been linked to Vibrio vulnificus infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Leg gangrene and endotoxic shock due to Vibrio parahemolyticusan infection acquired in New England coastal water. (springer.com)
  • Clinical features of Vibrio vulnificus infections in the coastal areas of the Ariake Sea, Japan. (ebscohost.com)
  • Capsular polysaccharide was purified from a whole-cell, phosphate-buffered saline-extracted preparation of the opaque, virulent phase of V. vulnificus M06-24 (M06-24/O) by dialysis, centrifugation, enzymatic digestion, and phenol-chloroform extraction. (asm.org)
  • While Vibrio vulnificus is one of the more infrequent causes of NF, it has a relatively high mortality rate of 26% [2] because it spreads quickly and it is hard to diagnose. (kenyon.edu)
  • Konishi K, Yamagishi T, Sakamoto K. A halophilic vibrio isolated from a case of chronic cholecystitis. (springer.com)
  • Lastly, V. vulnificus has been seen to cause more harm in patients who have higher levels of iron. (wikipedia.org)
  • Twenty-one patients with Vibrio vulnificus infection have been reported in the Japanese literature. (springer.com)
  • Results: Six patients in the Vibrio vulnificus group and four patients in the Aeromonas group died. (ebscohost.com)
  • The patients with Vibrio vulnificus infections had a significantly lower systolic blood pressure at presentation (p = 0.006). (ebscohost.com)
  • The patients with Aeromonas infections who died had significantly lower white blood-cell counts (p = 0.03) with significantly fewer numbers of segmented white blood cells than those who died in the Vibrio vulnificus group (p = 0.01). (ebscohost.com)
  • V. vulnificus infection is an acute illness, and those who recover should not expect any long-term consequences. (southernnevadahealthdistrict.org)
  • Wang SM, Liu CC, Chiou YY et al (2000) Vivrio vulnificus infection complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child with nephritic syndrome. (springer.com)