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  • clinical
  • That vaccine candidate was found to be safe and induced an immune response when tested in a Phase 1 clinical trial . (nih.gov)
  • A team of scientists here at NIAID worked tirelessly to rapidly develop this vaccine for clinical testing," said John Mascola, M.D., director of NIAID's VRC. (nih.gov)
  • The committee makes additional recommendations regarding surveillance and epidemiological research, clinical studies, and communication related to these vaccine safety concerns. (nationalacademies.org)
  • Given the public health need for safe and effective Ebola interventions, WHO regards the expedited evaluation of all Ebola vaccines with clinical grade material as a high priority. (who.int)
  • Two candidate vaccines have clinical-grade vials available for phase 1 pre-licensure clinical trials. (who.int)
  • Nurses in clinical practice run the risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens like Hepatitis B. For this reason, CDC recommends nurses and other health care workers be vaccinated against Hepatitis B, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration requires employers to offer free vaccine to any employee exposed to blood or other infectious material. (nursingworld.org)
  • Clinical and Vaccine Immunology 20 (2013): 663-672. (wikipedia.org)
  • Expert Review of Vaccines is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal covering all aspects impacting the clinical effectiveness of vaccines. (wikipedia.org)
  • This vaccine is now ready for human clinical trials. (wikipedia.org)
  • Examples of antigenic targets of hookworm vaccines currently in clinical trials include Na-ASP-2 from N. americanus, Ac-APR-1 from Ancylostoma caninum, Ac'-APR-1 and Na-GST-1/Alhydroge. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a clinical trial a vaccine containing recombinant Na-ASP-2 with Alhydrogel as an adjuvant was found to increase Th2 helper cells and IgE. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical disease, including paralysis, caused by vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) is indistinguishable from that caused by wild polioviruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ebola vaccine candidates against Ebola have been developed in the decade prior to 2014, but none have yet been approved for clinical use in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical trials involve the administration of the vaccine to healthy human subjects to evaluate the immune response, identify any side effects and determine the appropriate dosage. (wikipedia.org)
  • In September 2014, two Phase 1 clinical trials began for the vaccine cAd3-EBO Z, which is based on an attenuated version of a chimpanzee adenovirus (cAd3) that has been genetically altered so that it is unable to replicate in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Three doses of vaccine plus a booster reduced the risk of clinical episodes by 26 percent over three years, but offered no significant protection against severe malaria. (wikipedia.org)
  • varicella vaccine
  • Administration of varicella vaccine before the age of 15 months, and the prescription of oral steroids, may be associated with a slightly increased risk of breakthrough disease. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Varicella vaccine, also known as chickenpox vaccine, is a vaccine that protects against chickenpox. (wikipedia.org)
  • Varicella vaccine is 70% to 90% effective for preventing varicella and more than 95% effective for preventing severe varicella. (wikipedia.org)
  • The long-term duration of protection from varicella vaccine is unknown, but there are now persons vaccinated twenty years ago with no evidence of waning immunity, while others have become vulnerable in as few as six years. (wikipedia.org)
  • immune
  • DNA or gene-based vaccines induce antibodies, but they also can activate the cell-mediated immune response, which ultimately could yield strong and durable protection against disease. (nih.gov)
  • Addressing Parents' Concerns: Do Multiple Vaccines Overwhelm or Weaken the Infant's Immune System? (aappublications.org)
  • Implicit in this concern is that the infant's immune system is inadequately developed to handle vaccines safely or that multiple vaccines may overwhelm the immune system. (aappublications.org)
  • As a possible consequence of these trends, recent national surveys found that 23% of parents questioned the number of shots recommended for their children, 1 and 25% were concerned that vaccines might weaken the immune system. (aappublications.org)
  • This article will provide health care professionals with information about the effect of vaccines on the infant's immune system and the capacity of the immune system to respond safely to multiple vaccines. (aappublications.org)
  • Let's face it: the only real justification for using vaccines to 'immunize' ourselves against disease is derived from the natural fact that when challenged by infectious agents the humoral arm of our immune system launches a successful response capable of conferring lasting immunity. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Before vaccines, the only way to become immune to a disease was to actually get it and, with luck, survive it. (news-medical.net)
  • Vaccines, which provide artificially acquired immunity, are a much safer way to become immune. (news-medical.net)
  • The vaccines require two or three doses depending on a person's age and immune status. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adjuvants commonly are used to boost immune response, particularly for older people (50-75 years and up), whose immune response to a simple vaccine may have weakened. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the current formulation of IPV is used, 90% or more of individuals develop protective antibody to all three serotypes of polio virus after two doses of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV), and at least 99% are immune to polio virus following three doses. (wikipedia.org)
  • In December 2014, University of Oxford expanded the trial to include a booster vaccine based on MVA-BN, a strain of Modified vaccinia Ankara, developed by Bavarian Nordic, to investigate whether it can help increase immune responses further. (wikipedia.org)
  • The polysaccharide vaccines, while effective in healthy adults, are not effective in children less than two years old or those with poor immune function. (wikipedia.org)
  • outbreaks
  • The CDC and corresponding national organisations are carefully observing the failure rate which may be high compared with other modern vaccines-large outbreaks of chickenpox having occurred at schools which required their children to be vaccinated. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is believed to be a rare event, but outbreaks of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP), caused by a circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV), have been reported, and tend to occur in areas of low coverage by OPV, presumably because the OPV is itself protective against the related outbreak strain. (wikipedia.org)
  • least 300
  • It is believed that vaccines produce at least 300% more cases of polio than those existing in the wild, indicating that a natural problem has been transformed into a manmade one. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • introduction of new vaccines
  • Vaccine introduction grants (VIGs) cover a share of the cost of pre-introduction activities (such as health worker training) and are intended to facilitate the timely and effective introduction of new vaccines into routine immunisation programmes. (gavi.org)
  • After the introduction of new vaccines, the number of cases dropped to fewer than 150 per year (median of 56). (wikipedia.org)
  • hepatitis B vacci
  • Startling new research published in the journal Apoptosis indicates that hepatitis B vaccine, which is designed to prevent Hepatitis B virus-induced damage to the liver, actually causes liver cell destruction. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • malaria
  • Could A Malaria Vaccine Be On The Way? (gadling.com)
  • The UK drug company GlaxoSmithKline is applying for regulatory approval of the world's first malaria vaccine, the BBC reports . (gadling.com)
  • GlaxoSmithKline's research was supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the company says it will make the vaccine affordable for poorer nations.Ninety percent of the world's malaria cases are in the poorer regions of sub-Saharan Africa where the vaccine was tested. (gadling.com)
  • Malaria vaccine is a vaccine that is used to prevent malaria. (wikipedia.org)
  • RTS,S (developed by PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI) and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation) is the most recently developed recombinant vaccine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The task of developing a preventive vaccine for malaria is a complex process. (wikipedia.org)
  • effective
  • A safe and effective vaccine to prevent Zika virus infection and the devastating birth defects it causes is a public health imperative," said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. "NIAID worked expeditiously to ready a vaccine candidate, and results in animal testing have been very encouraging. (nih.gov)
  • The latest oral vaccines appear to offer around 87% protection against Vibrio Cholerae, at least in the short term, stockpiling this vaccine in developed countries with effective water treatment would be pointless really, there would be little possibility of spread. (physicsforums.com)
  • It is a heavily guarded secret within the medical establishment (especially within the corridors of the CDC) that the Cochrane Database Review, which is the gold standard within the evidence-based medical model for assessing the effectiveness of common medical interventions, does not lend unequivocal scientific support to the belief and/or propaganda that flu vaccines are safe and effective. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Operational support for campaigns (Ops) aims to facilitate the timely and effective delivery of vaccines to communities targeted by a campaign. (gavi.org)
  • Unfortunately, the percentages the company is quoting do not indicate that it will be as effective as many of the vaccines we are used to. (gadling.com)
  • Vaccines against the livestock and human disease anthrax-caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis-have had a prominent place in the history of medicine, from Pasteur's pioneering 19th-century work with cattle (the first effective bacterial vaccine and the second effective vaccine ever) to the controversial late 20th century use of a modern product to protect American troops against the use of anthrax in biological warfare. (wikipedia.org)
  • In those already infected the vaccines are not effective. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two doses of vaccine are more effective than one. (wikipedia.org)
  • No effective vaccine for the disease exists yet. (wikipedia.org)
  • While chemotherepeutic drugs, such as praziquantel, oxamniquine and metrifonate, are currently considered safe and effective for the treatment of schistosomiasis, reinfection occurs frequently following drug treatment, thus a vaccine is sought to provide long-term treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • No effective vaccine for the disease in humans has yet been developed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The government of Brazil, where hookworm is still endemic in some poorer areas, has promised to manufacture a vaccine if one can be proven effective. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vaccine was shown to be less effective for infants. (wikipedia.org)
  • dose of vaccine
  • Within the pneumococcal row, stippling was added to heart disease/chronic lung disease, chronic liver disease, and diabetes columns to clarify that in some situations children with these conditions may be recommended to receive an additional dose of vaccine. (cdc.gov)
  • One dose of vaccine prevents 95% of moderate disease and 100% of severe disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • infectious
  • JE vaccine is recommended for travelers who plan to spend a month or longer in endemic areas during the JEV transmission season and for laboratory workers with a potential for exposure to infectious JEV. (cdc.gov)
  • children
  • Today, children receive 11 vaccines routinely and as many as 20 shots by 2 years of age (Table 1) . (aappublications.org)
  • Parents who exercise a vaccine exemption for their children are often ridiculed for putting their own children and others at risk. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • JE-MB is the only JE vaccine available for use in children aged 1−16 years, and remaining supplies will be reserved for use in this group. (cdc.gov)
  • For the past several years, GlaxoSmithKline has conducted tests of its vaccine on almost 15,500 children in seven African countries. (gadling.com)
  • Until recently, most vaccines were aimed at babies and children alone. (news-medical.net)
  • The resulting vaccine was given to about 2,000 children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aiming to address the barrier of cost to families, the Vaccines for Children program represented a major vaccine finance reform, working as a state-operated federal entitlement program that supplied both public and private providers with federally purchased vaccines. (wikipedia.org)
  • For underinsured children and adolescents, VFC vaccines may still be provided, but only at sites that are federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) or rural health clinics (RHCs). (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 2012 most European countries either recommend it for all children or just those at high risk, but not all countries provide the vaccine due to its cost. (wikipedia.org)
  • This has been the case of children who get the vaccine in their early childhood and later have contact with children with chickenpox. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the vaccine was first used in 2007, at least 63 children have died after being vaccinated. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most widely administered pentavalent vaccine globally - Quinvaxem has been administered to 400 million children as of 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • The standard 23-valent vaccines are ineffective for children under two years old. (wikipedia.org)
  • On 24 July 2015, Mosquirix received a positive opinion from the EMA on the proposal of the vaccine to be used to vaccinate children aged 6 weeks to 17 months outside the European Union. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 2004 the vaccine is given to about 100 million children per year globally. (wikipedia.org)
  • major vaccine
  • In nearly each case, major vaccine producers have risen to the challenge, setting aside their day-to-day profit-making activities to try to meet a pressing societal need. (statnews.com)
  • antibodies
  • Ideally a vaccine would enable the development of anti-plasmodial antibodies in addition to generating an elevated cell-mediated response. (wikipedia.org)
  • preventable
  • Whenever I hear the term "vaccine-preventable" disease, I automatically think "magic-bean preventable" disease. (statnews.com)
  • JE virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is the most common vaccine-preventable cause of encephalitis in Asia. (cdc.gov)
  • The other vaccine-preventable illnesses continue to cause millions of deaths each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that licensed vaccines are currently available for twenty-five different preventable infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jenny McCarthy
  • The medical community wrongly believes the anti-vaccine movement began with Jenny McCarthy and Andrew Wakefield, when in fact, the movement began long before that. (statnews.com)