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  • vaccination
  • This report summarizes the status of typhoid surveillance and vaccination programs in the WHO South-East Asia (SEAR) and Western Pacific regions (WPR) during 2009-2013, after the revised WHO recommendations. (cdc.gov)
  • Nine (19%) countries reported implementation of typhoid vaccination programs or recommended vaccine use during 2009-2013. (cdc.gov)
  • Despite the high incidence, typhoid surveillance is weak in these two regions, and vaccination efforts have been limited. (cdc.gov)
  • Further progress toward typhoid fever prevention and control in SEAR and WPR will require country commitment and international support for enhanced surveillance, targeted use of existing vaccines and availability of newer vaccines integrated within routine immunization programs, and integration of vaccination with safe water, sanitation, and hygiene measures. (cdc.gov)
  • He is one of NIBSC's observers on Joint Vaccination and Immunisation Committee (JCVI) and a member of the JCVI subgroups on meningococcal and pneumococcal vaccines. (springer.com)
  • He chairs the UK Department of Health's Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation and the European Medicines Agency scientific advisory group on vaccines. (springer.com)
  • Much of the thinking behind the concept of vaccination stems from a philosophical belief of the causation of disease, which perverts our understanding of the innate, self-regulating mechanisms of the body. (blogspot.com)
  • Between 1973 and 1984 one quarter of all reported cases of paralytic polio occurred soon after vaccination, with 94% of these after the first dose of oral vaccine. (blogspot.com)
  • As has been stated before, all medical and non-medical authorities on vaccination agree that vaccines are designed to cause a mild case of the diseases they are supposed to prevent. (whale.to)
  • The conglomerate disease brought on by the many poison vaccines baffled the doctors, as they never had a vaccination spree before which used so many different vaccines. (whale.to)
  • The development of severe disease, which occurs in approximately 10 to 15% of patients, depends on host factors (i.e., immunosuppression, antacid therapy, previous exposure, and vaccination), strain virulence and inoculum, and choice of antibiotic therapy. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • This new policy will help ensure access to typhoid vaccination in communities most impacted by the disease, which is responsible for more than 12.5 million infections a year. (sabin.org)
  • The paradigm that vaccines provide 'lifetime immunity' is abandoned, and the concept of 're-vaccination' is sanctioned. (wordpress.com)
  • A survey of more than 1,000 reveals more than 1 in 3 people in the UK are not aware of the diseases which can be prevented by vaccination. (medindia.net)
  • Nearly two-thirds did not know that typhoid could be prevented by vaccination, while two out of five incorrectly believed there was a vaccine for malaria. (medindia.net)
  • When Army vaccinations became compulsory in 1911, the death rate from typhoid vaccination rose to the highest point in the history of the US Army. (modernhomoeopathy.com)
  • This plan aims to strengthen routine immunization in order to check the transmission of communicable diseases through intermittent assessments to evaluate the achieved progress, measured in terms of national, vaccination coverage target goals that have been effectively met. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • For instance, in 2014, 115 million infants across the world received the Diphtheria, Pertussis, and Tetanus (DPT3) vaccine and around 129 countries globally have achieved nearly 90% vaccination coverage for DPT3. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • Infection
  • Typhoid fever is a serious, systemic infection resulting in nearly 22 million cases and 216,500 deaths annually, primarily in Asia ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Andrew J Pollard, FRCPCH PhD, is Professor of Paediatric Infection and Immunity at the University of Oxford, Director of the Oxford Vaccine Group, Fellow of St Cross College, and Honorary Consultant Paediatrician at the Children's Hospital, Oxford, UK. (springer.com)
  • Vaccines can be made from the causative agent of a single infection, so-called monovalent vaccines, or from a combination of two or more causative agents, polyvalent vaccines. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have for the first time found evidence that the presence of a key species in the human gut microbiome is associated with protection from infection with typhoid fever. (umaryland.edu)
  • The new study, performed in the UM Cooperative Center for Human Immunology (CCHI) , supported by the Division of Allergy, Immunology and Transplantation (DAIT) , National Institute of Allergic and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) , and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) , establishes for the first time that certain gut microbes may keep infection at bay. (umaryland.edu)
  • The study's lead author, Claire M. Fraser, PhD , a professor of medicine at UMSOM as well as director of the school's Institute for Genome Sciences , said the researchers sought to examine how differences in the gut microbiome might affect infection with typhoid bacteria. (umaryland.edu)
  • Her research has focussed on how the body defends itself against infections with HPV, how to develop vaccines that prevent HPV infection as well as those that might treat HPV infection. (europeanvaccinesdiagnostics.com)
  • The Department has major interests in developmental immunology, infectious diseases of infancy and childhood, HIV infection and immune control, design, development and testing of vaccines, and in paediatric molecular genetics. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The discovery will lead to a dramatic shift in our understanding of how the body's immune system responds to infection caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and pave the way for more effective vaccines. (medindia.net)
  • One-third of the world's population is at risk of contracting typhoid, a systemic bacterial infection spread through contaminated food and water that kills more than 128,000 people each year, primarily children in low-income countries. (sabin.org)
  • Typhoid/paratyphoid fever is an invasive infection that manifests as bacteremia and can progress to sepsis and multi-organ failure. (cps.ca)
  • diphtheria
  • The diphtheria vaccine caused lung congestion, chills and fever, swollen, sore throat clogged with the false membrane, and the choking suffocation because of difficulty in breathing followed by gasping and death, after which the body turned black from stagnant blood that had been deprived of oxygen in the suffocation stages. (whale.to)
  • TV personality, Tony Robinson, whose aunt died of the vaccine-preventable disease diphtheria, is leading the Valuing Vaccines campaign. (medindia.net)
  • vaccinations
  • The book was originally commissioned due to recent developments in vaccinations to prevent meningococcal disease. (springer.com)
  • Dr. Young has stated that the use of vaccinations, antibiotics and anti-fungals will only poison the body leading to the one sickness and one disease - latent tissue acidosis and then death. (wordpress.com)
  • Moreover, the development of new and improved vaccinations for several diseases is a major factor projected to propel growth. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • The vaccinations under development in the Phase III clinical trials include Herpes Zoster Subunit (HZ/su), a recombinant version of the "Shingles Vaccine", which is determined to be successful in 51% of the tested adults, aged 60 and above, however the effectiveness is found to decrease with age. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • polio
  • In short it appears that the most effective way to protect your child from polio is to make sure that he doesn't get the vaccine. (blogspot.com)
  • Polio vaccine is no longer recommended for US travelers. (cdc.gov)
  • However, all travelers (residents and nationals) from countries reporting cases of polio should check to see if there is a requirement for a dose of polio vaccine prior to entry into India. (cdc.gov)
  • oral vaccine
  • 36% occurred in people who were in contact with vaccinated children, with 82% of these after the contact person had received the first dose of oral vaccine. (blogspot.com)
  • meningococcal vaccine
  • Because of his broad experience of bacterial vaccines and molecular biology, he has been closely involved with a number of meningococcal vaccine developments. (springer.com)
  • Despite evidence of direct protection from the group B meningococcal vaccine introduced into the infant immunisation schedule in 2015, no herd immune effect has been observed from this program. (ox.ac.uk)
  • immunisation
  • Current methods of immunisation include the use of live vaccines (this involves inactivated forms of the micro-organisms responsible for the particular disease). (blogspot.com)
  • The dependency on immunisation to give protection against disease misses the key factor in the equation - the individual's immune system. (blogspot.com)
  • She acts as the invited HPV expert for the HPV subcommittee of the Joint Committee on Vaccines and Immunisation in the UK. (europeanvaccinesdiagnostics.com)
  • The project will evaluate the impact of immunisation with vaccines against pneumococcus and meningococcus on pharyngeal carriage of these organisms. (ox.ac.uk)
  • However, the impact of the two licensed MenB vaccines on carriage of meningococcus is uncertain, hence the need for a community based clinical trial to evaluate whether an adolescent MenB immunisation campaign could achieve protection in the broader community against MenB disease. (ox.ac.uk)
  • In the circumstances, health experts are launching a campaign Valuing Vaccines to spread the message about the importance of immunisation. (medindia.net)
  • influenza
  • Very few people realize that the worst epidemic ever to hit America, the Spanish Influenza of 1918 was the after effect of the massive nation-wide vaccine campaign. (orgoneproducts.org)
  • prevention
  • This concise pocketbook will provide readers with an overview and background of meningococcal disease, treatment options and emerging therapies, and methods of prevention. (springer.com)
  • All who care about the prevention of disease, whether in animals or humans, must certainly feel themselves in his debt. (animalresearch.info)
  • Especially in the practice of preventive medicine, we are increasingly dependent on the public's understanding of the methods of scientific medicine and of the need to use animal experiment as well as human observation to divine the causes and plan the prevention of disease. (animalresearch.info)
  • development of vaccines
  • A new public-private coalition, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), which is backed by the Wellcome Trust and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, was formed in September with the aim of derailing epidemics by speeding up the development of vaccines. (pharmaceutical-technology.com)
  • develop vaccines
  • But, according to Ted Fjällman, PhD, CEO of Prokarium, a UK synthetic biology company that has secured £2m from UK and Mexican Government contracts to develop vaccines against plague, Zika, bacterial diarrhoea and enteric fever, the biggest challenge is to speed up the R&D of new vaccines and allow clinical trials to be performed in a fast track mode, if and when there are signs of an epidemic unfolding. (pharmaceutical-technology.com)
  • At Prokarium, work is underway to develop vaccines against both emerging diseases and bioterrorist threats, with the first - an anti-bioterror vaccine against plague - set to start Phase I clinical trials in 2017. (pharmaceutical-technology.com)
  • Symptoms
  • Symptoms usually begin 6-30 days after exposure and are the same as those of typhoid fever . (wikipedia.org)
  • They may continue to be present in the stool of asymptomatic carriers, who are persons who have recovered from the symptoms of the disease but continue to carry the bacteria. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Other symptoms of typhoid fever include constipation (at first), extreme fatigue, headache, joint pain, and a rash across the abdomen known as rose spots. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The doctors call it a new disease and proceed to suppress the symptoms. (whale.to)
  • The new disease they had created had symptoms of all the diseases they had injected into the man. (whale.to)
  • outbreaks
  • However, there have been reports in the early 2000s of typhoid outbreaks within the United States that were unrelated to recent travel. (encyclopedia.com)
  • yellow fever
  • There are not that many vaccines and medications that we routinely deal with, and good resources are available to look up malaria and yellow fever risk areas. (istm.org)
  • The need to consider risk and benefit comes to a head with vaccine recommendations for yellow fever vaccine and Japanese encephalitis vaccine. (istm.org)
  • For example, when do you forego yellow fever vaccine due to your concern about the risks of the vaccine, and then what do you tell your traveler about the risks of the disease? (istm.org)
  • Antibiotic
  • We would suggest that such high microbial gut concentration guarantees increased spontaneous mutation leading to polyclonality and antibiotic resistance in typhoid and paratyphoid carriers, in a similar manner as it occurs in the critically ill with gut overgrowth of potentially pathogenic organisms4,5. (bmj.com)
  • vaccinia
  • Vaccine was first used in 1796 by the English physician E. Jenner, who inoculated persons with cowpox, or vaccinia (hence the name "vaccine") to protect them against smallpox. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • According to a report in the Irish Examiner, 'The report of the Surgeon-General of the US Army shows that during 1917 there were admitted into the army hospitals 19,608 men suffering from anti-typhoid inoculation and vaccinia. (modernhomoeopathy.com)
  • carriers
  • Some people who recover from Typhoid Fever and Paratyphoid Fever continue to be carriers of the bacteria and can potentially infect others. (iamat.org)
  • Second, although the intensity of excretion by carriers may vary widely, figures as high as 450x106 organisms per gram of faeces in a paratyphoid carrier have been quoted, and between 1x106 and 10000x106 for typhoid carriers3. (bmj.com)
  • pneumonia
  • Lavelle, who is Lecturer in Immunology in the School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College Dublin, said: "This is a very exciting finding and supports the development of inflammasome activating vaccines to prevent pneumococcal diseases including pneumonia and septicaemia. (medindia.net)