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  • doses
  • GENEVA (Reuters) - A third producer of oral cholera vaccine has been approved that is expected to provide 3 million doses in 2016, the World Health Organization said on Friday, doubling the world's stockpile against a disease that can kill within hours. (reuters.com)
  • clinical
  • That vaccine candidate was found to be safe and induced an immune response when tested in a Phase 1 clinical trial . (nih.gov)
  • A team of scientists here at NIAID worked tirelessly to rapidly develop this vaccine for clinical testing," said John Mascola, M.D., director of NIAID's VRC. (nih.gov)
  • The committee makes additional recommendations regarding surveillance and epidemiological research, clinical studies, and communication related to these vaccine safety concerns. (nationalacademies.org)
  • In addition to Hantavax three more vaccine candidates have been studied in I-II stage clinical trials. (wikipedia.org)
  • On April 14, 2009, Dendreon Corporation announced that their Phase III clinical trial of sipuleucel-T , a cancer vaccine designed to treat prostate cancer, had demonstrated an increase in survival. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consultations and expert working groups on technical issues important to the field are also documented, giving interested parties the latest information available on complex issues such as biocontainment of potential pandemic threats, clinical and non-clinical testing of vaccines, risks of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE's), DNA vaccines, and a variety of other topics. (who.int)
  • efficacy
  • 3 At that time, they found that by using serologic measures, i.e., the increase in influenza antibodies identified in the blood, results in an overestimation of vaccine efficacy. (mercola.com)
  • vials
  • Antibiotics are added to the vaccine to prevent the growth of bacteria within the vials of the vaccine during production and storage of the vaccine. (news-medical.net)
  • Thimerosal is a preservative containing mercury that is added to vials of vaccine that contain more than one dose to prevent contamination and growth of potentially harmful bacteria. (news-medical.net)
  • antibodies
  • DNA or gene-based vaccines induce antibodies, but they also can activate the cell-mediated immune response, which ultimately could yield strong and durable protection against disease. (nih.gov)
  • Image by Keith Weller, USDA via Wikimedia Commons Researchers at the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative at Scripps Research Institute have discovered that cows can produce antibodies that effectively neutralize HIV. (scienceblogs.com)
  • The rabies vaccine stimulates the immune system to produce antibodies against the rabies virus and is given to prevent this disease. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • People who have an underactive immune system (for example due to a genetic defect, disease such as HIV infection , or treatment with immunosuppressant medicines such as chemotherapy , high-dose corticosteroids, or immunosuppressants , eg to prevent rejection of organ transplants), may not produce enough antibodies in response to this vaccine. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • You may need to have additional doses of the vaccine to make sure you produce enough antibodies to protect you from the virus. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • some individuals are "non-responders" to certain vaccines, meaning that they do not generate antibodies even after being vaccinated correctly. (wikipedia.org)
  • porcine
  • Gelatin, which is partially hydrolysed collagen, usually of bovine (cow) or porcine (pig) origin, is added to some vaccines as a stabiliser. (news-medical.net)
  • Carlos de la Rosa, 53, chief conservation and education officer with the Catalina Island Conservancy, holds a test dart that will be used to inject the contraceptive vaccine porcine zona pellucida into female bison. (baltimoresun.com)
  • biological
  • Biological medicinal products, such as vaccines, blood and blood products, diagnostics, gene therapy, biotechnology products, cytokines and growth factors, and cell and tissue products rely heavily on international standardization to ensure their quality and their equivalence across manufacturers. (who.int)
  • varicella
  • Administration of varicella vaccine before the age of 15 months, and the prescription of oral steroids, may be associated with a slightly increased risk of breakthrough disease. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • miscarriages
  • A shocking report from the National Coalition of Organized Women (NCOW) presented data to the CDC from two different sources demonstrating that the 2009/10 H1N1 vaccines contributed to an estimated 1,588 miscarriages and stillbirths. (newmediaexplorer.org)
  • Does the flu vaccine cause miscarriages? (scienceblogs.com)
  • prophylactic
  • Vaccines can be prophylactic (example: to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by a natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g., vaccines against cancer are being investigated). (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • Hantavirus vaccine is a vaccine that protects in humans against hantavirus infections causing Hantavirus hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Field trial of an inactivated vaccine against hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antibody responses in humans to an inactivated hantavirus vaccine (Hantavax). (wikipedia.org)
  • adverse events
  • CDC's Dr. Marie McCormick, chair of the H1N1 Vaccine Risk and Assessment Working Group, said at the 3rd conference-the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) that there were absolutely no H1N1 vaccine-related adverse events in pregnant women in 2009/10, directly contradicting the publicly available evidence. (newmediaexplorer.org)
  • potency
  • In most cases, if not used within 30 minutes, the vaccine will lose its potency and the patient will not be properly immunized. (aap.org)
  • Thiomersal is more effective against bacteria, has better shelf life and also increases vaccine stability, safety and potency. (news-medical.net)
  • strain
  • Quadrivalent flu vaccines, which contain the same three strains as the trivalent, plus a second influenza B strain: B/Phuket/3073/2013-like (B/Yamagata lineage) virus. (mercola.com)
  • A STRAIN of whooping cough that is resistant to a leading vaccine is causing an epidemic among children in the Netherlands and is spreading across Europe. (newscientist.com)
  • Prevention
  • At the end of that same year, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) analysis 2 of flu vaccine effectiveness revealed that, between 2005 and 2015, the influenza vaccine was actually less than 50 percent effective more than half of the time. (mercola.com)
  • The harm from vaccines has seriously exceeded the non-existent benefit of disease prevention. (statnews.com)
  • Required by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regulations for vaccines purchased through CDC contract. (aap.org)
  • effective
  • A safe and effective vaccine to prevent Zika virus infection and the devastating birth defects it causes is a public health imperative," said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. "NIAID worked expeditiously to ready a vaccine candidate, and results in animal testing have been very encouraging. (nih.gov)
  • The latest oral vaccines appear to offer around 87% protection against Vibrio Cholerae, at least in the short term, stockpiling this vaccine in developed countries with effective water treatment would be pointless really, there would be little possibility of spread. (physicsforums.com)
  • It is a heavily guarded secret within the medical establishment (especially within the corridors of the CDC) that the Cochrane Database Review, which is the gold standard within the evidence-based medical model for assessing the effectiveness of common medical interventions, does not lend unequivocal scientific support to the belief and/or propaganda that flu vaccines are safe and effective. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Operational support for campaigns (Ops) aims to facilitate the timely and effective delivery of vaccines to communities targeted by a campaign. (gavi.org)
  • Thus far, developing an effective vaccine for HIV has been hampered by the ability of the virus to mutate. (scienceblogs.com)
  • The Dutch whole-cell vaccine is usually nearly 100 per cent effective and 96 per cent of all children are immunised, so the rash of cases has been confounding experts for the past 18 months. (newscientist.com)
  • beliefs
  • Alternative vaccine views support this assertion, but the reasoning in this article comes straight from mainstream vaccine beliefs, accepted medical practice and current law. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • prevent
  • There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics to prevent or treat Zika virus disease. (nih.gov)
  • While the Polio Global Eradication Initiative (PGEI), founded in 1988, declares itself successful in nearly eradicating wild-type polio in nations like India, vaccine-induced polio paralysis cases far outnumber those the vaccines were intended to prevent. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • vaccines stand as our only chance to prevent pandemic influenza, AIDS, and bioterror, and our best chance to prevent certain cancers. (google.com)
  • Their false premise is that vaccines cause more disease than they prevent. (google.com)
  • The vaccine is also given to prevent rabies in people bitten by an animal suspected to have rabies, whether or not the person has been previously immunised (post-exposure prophylaxis). (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • acute
  • The vaccine is considered important as acute hantavirus infections are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • schedules
  • 9 Although the majority of parents accept vaccines, the increasing frequency of refusal and the requests for alternative vaccine schedules indicate that there are still significant barriers to overcome. (aappublications.org)
  • cancer
  • America's biopharmaceutical research companies are developing 1,100 medicines and vaccines for cancer. (phrma.org)
  • For preventive cancer vaccine, see cancer immunoprevention . (wikipedia.org)
  • A cancer vaccine is a vaccine that either treats existing cancer or prevents development of a cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Traditional vaccines against cancer-causing bacteria (oncobacteria) are not further discussed in this article. (wikipedia.org)
  • CancerVax (Canvaxin), Genitope Corp (MyVax personalized immunotherapy), and FavId (Favrille Inc) are examples of cancer vaccine projects that have been terminated, both due to poor phase III results. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • 1 Vaccine hesitancy has been characterized recently by a committee at the World Health Organization as "a behavior, influenced by a number of factors including issues of confidence (do not trust a vaccine or a provider), complacency (do not perceive a need for a vaccine or do not value the vaccine), and convenience (access). (aappublications.org)
  • Using Merck's Gardasil vaccine as a case in point, an investigation documents Big Pharma's near-total control of governmental health agency decisions and the utter lack of concern by the decision makers. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • The committee recommends a public health response that fully supports an array of vaccine safety activities. (nationalacademies.org)
  • HSIS includes long-term health system strengthening support as well as one-off grants or complementary allocations, which cover part of the operational cost of new vaccine introductions, campaigns and vaccine product switches. (gavi.org)
  • Few other public health initiatives (such as indoor plumbing) have done more good for our population than vaccines. (google.com)
  • disease
  • When someone immunised with this vaccine is infected with the mutant whooping cough bacterium, they lose only part of their ability to fight the disease. (newscientist.com)
  • In the 1990's, he wanted to show that the measles vaccine (MMR) caused Crohn's disease (a chronic bowel condition). (google.com)
  • A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe, its toxins, or one of its surface proteins. (wikipedia.org)