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  • 2016
  • it is projected that even with the implementation of the health care law in 2016, roughly 30 million people are still expected to be without insurance coverage and find service in safety net hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • World Health Organ
  • The World Health Organization is concerned with overcrowding of sleeping accommodation primarily as a risk for the spread of tuberculosis and has attempted to develop measurement indicators. (wikipedia.org)
  • outcomes
  • The comprehensive urban DOTS program significantly improved service accessibility, TB case finding, and treatment outcomes in Kabul. (msh.org)
  • Current projects focus on the relationships among social characteristics and mental health outcomes including access to education, employment, stigma and discrimination experienced by people with serious mental illness. (northeastern.edu)
  • The practice model integrates care to improve access to care, care coordination and both behavioral and physical health outcomes for an urban, low-income, underserved, predominately Black population. (uwm.edu)
  • Secondary analysis of 10 years of nursing informatics data from women, ages 13-40, receiving health care services in a Midwestern Nurse Managed Health Center to determine health outcomes and predict risks for women of childbearing age. (uwm.edu)
  • neighborhoods
  • African food deserts have been defined as "poor, often informal, urban neighborhoods characterized by high food insecurity and low dietary diversity, with multiple markets and market and non-market food sources but variable household access to food. (wikipedia.org)
  • Centre
  • The regional workshop on urban health equity assessment and intersectoral response was held in New Delhi during 27-29 November 2012 as part of collaboration between WHO Kobe Centre and the WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia, to strengthen the capacities of the health sector, urban planners, municipalities, local government and relevant partners to assess and respond to health inequities in urban areas. (who.int)
  • Urban Health Resource Centre (UHRC) is a non-government organization that works towards socio-economic empowerment, improved quality of life, health, nutrition, well-being and empowered social organization among disadvantaged urban communities through - (i) demand-supply improvement, community-provider linkages, and demonstration programs that use a consultative and partnership based approach, (ii) technical support to government and non-government agencies and (iii) research, advocacy and knowledge dissemination. (wikipedia.org)
  • socio-economic
  • UHRC was established in 2005 as a registered non-profit company under India's Companies Act, 1956 with the aim of working towards socio-economic empowerment, improved quality of life, health, nutrition, and general well-being for urban disadvantaged families. (wikipedia.org)
  • Collaborative
  • Innovates an interprofessional collaborative partnership between an urban Nurse Managed Health Center and a Primary Care Medical Family Health Center, and a community-based organization that resettles immigrants and refugees to expand health services for local immigrants and refugees while developing a model of interprofessional education. (uwm.edu)
  • social
  • An integrative approach to respond to health inequities was drawn from intersectoral actions to address specific health, social, economic, environmental and human rights issues, using healthy cities as a positive umbrella to strategically engage multisectoral partners. (who.int)
  • We will continue to do this through the engagement of inter-disciplinary faculty, and undergraduate and graduate students form Bouve' and campus wide who share a commitment to urban health and social justice. (northeastern.edu)
  • The program works toward building their capacity to take charge of processes that affect family economics, health, education, nutrition, housing improvement and overall social wellbeing. (wikipedia.org)
  • UHRC provides targeted trainings and workshops to community groups on topics such as a) acquiring knowledge, b) building negotiations skills (such as sending collective application to civic authorities) and, c) interfacing with diverse government agencies to improve slum living environments and access to health, nutrition and social entitlements. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later studies such as the National Food Consumption Survey of 1999 and South African Social Attitudes Survey of 2008 independently assessed the urban food insecurity rate to be roughly half of that of the rural rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the legalization of cannabis remains controversial, the introduction of heroin-assisted treatment in 1998 has been lauded for considerably improving the health and social situation of opiate-dependent patients in the Netherlands. (wikipedia.org)
  • examines
  • This study examines the climate change and urban health vulnerability of suburban Pralab, Khon Kaen City, in the northeast of Thailand. (eldis.org)
  • To better meet women's emergency contraceptive needs and to contribute to the limited knowledge base regarding this method in Africa, this study examines data from a sample of EC users drawn from a large, representative household survey that included sexually experienced women in urban Kenya and Nigeria. (msh.org)
  • nationally
  • Bivariate and multivariate analyses reveal greater knowledge of EC among these urban women than was reported in other nationally representative surveys. (msh.org)
  • renewal
  • The predominant generator of population displacement is government sponsored projects: new highways, education campuses, hospitals, and other urban renewal projects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Community displacement is a key argument against informal and formal urban renewal projects. (wikipedia.org)
  • assess
  • The session will begin with a poll to assess audience awareness of critical issues related to urban health that require urgent issues that the university community should address. (eiseverywhere.com)
  • public
  • There is a special emphasis on improving the lives of people using public mental health and substance abuse services. (northeastern.edu)
  • There is a complex array of public funding that comes to safety net hospitals (as being legally defined as a safety net hospital entitles these entities to financial compensation to overcome the cost of medical expenses not paid for by patients) mostly through Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital Payments, Medicaid Upper Payment Limit Payments, Medicaid Indirect Medical Education Payments, and state/local indigent health programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • implementation
  • The Urban HEART (‎health equity and response tool)‎ was introduced along with practical examples of local implementation from pilot sites. (who.int)
  • hospitals
  • The medical center is municipally owned by NYC Health + Hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital enjoyed a resurgence in the 1970s as one of the finest institutions for the care of the sick and the training of professionals in the newly formed New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The missions of safety net hospitals are rather, to focus and emphasize their devotion to providing the best possible care for those who are barred from health care due to the various possible adverse circumstances. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Health and Hospital Corporation in NYC, Cook County Health and Hospital System in Chicago, and Parkland Health & Hospital System in Dallas are three of the United States' largest safety net hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ultimately, gradual changes will be made, starting in 2017, to cut the DSH in half because of the theory that once people sign up for insurance with the health care law, there will be a much lesser need for safety net hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • program
  • Todorova I, Tejada S, Castaneda-Sceppa C. "Let's Stretch Life a Bit": Perspectives of Puerto Rican Adults about Heart Health and a potential Community Program. (northeastern.edu)
  • Lincoln's specialty diabetes clinics include adult, pediatric, pregnancy and diabetes education programs, as well as recently receiving a grant from the United Hospital Fund to implement a new health literacy program for its diabetes clinic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, surveys of urban principals have shown that they welcome AARP Foundation Experience Corps in their schools because the program results in improved student academic achievement. (wikipedia.org)
  • The program had its beginnings in a 1988 concept paper by John W. Gardner, former Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare and founder of Common Cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • informal
  • This survey took into account other urban African factors than distribution of market retailers such as supermarkets to include the tendency of residents to utilize formal food sources over informal like agriculture and local markets. (wikipedia.org)
  • linkages
  • It focuses on the dynamics of urbanisation and climate change risks, and on the linkages between urbanisation, climate change and emerging patterns of urban poverty and vulnerability. (eldis.org)
  • women's
  • Cluster-level congresses of women's groups and slum-level groups receive regular supervision, mentoring support and materials (such as steel containers to store registers, charts, behaviour promotion materials, floor mats to sit during meetings) from UHRC teams to carry out meetings and activities working towards improved health and well-being. (wikipedia.org)
  • education
  • It is the necessary result of urban redevelopment of a residential neighborhood to non-residential uses including retail, education, healthcare, and transportation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Departments
  • BY JOE MARVILLI Staff Writer Queensborough Community College recently received a large grant that it is putting to use in its health and science departments. (queenstribune.com)
  • local
  • This report is intended to be shared with the global network of urban health, Member States, UN agencies, and national counterparts working in the area of urban health in South-East Asia, including academia, nongovernmental organizations, mayors and local authorities. (who.int)
  • Overcrowding or crowding refers to the condition where more people are located within a given space than is considered tolerable from a safety and health perspective which will depend on current environment and local cultural norms. (wikipedia.org)
  • ethics
  • Kristin Madison, Kevin G. Volpp & Scott D. Halpern, The Law, Policy, and Ethics of Employers' Use of Financial Incentives to Improve Health , 39 J.L. Med. (northeastern.edu)
  • community
  • Some of the first activities the UHRC encourages slum women to discuss and analyze health, well-being challenges faced by their families and the community as a whole. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently, the terms urban displacement and community displacement are used commonly. (wikipedia.org)
  • It occupies five full city blocks, providing health care to the entire South Bronx community, as well as parts of Upper Manhattan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although it constitutes 9% of the beds in the region, Lincoln caters to 31% of the health care visits of this community, where there is fewer than one primary care physician for every 4,000 people. (wikipedia.org)
  • physical health
  • They found that older adults who volunteer in urban schools not only improve the educational experience of children, but also realize meaningful improvements in their own mental and physical health. (wikipedia.org)
  • settings
  • We recommend that the urban DOTS approach be replicated in other countries and cities in Afghanistan with settings similar to Kabul. (msh.org)
  • City
  • The effect of the floods on the health of the residents is intensified by wastewater discharged from the city drainage system into the suburban area of Pralab. (eldis.org)
  • providers
  • Groups and cluster-team members are also coached on negotiation skills and provided trainings on how to effectively negotiate with healthcare providers and other civic authorities through dialogue and formal applications to obtain health services and environmental services such as road paving, drain installation, sanitation/water infrastructure, garbage removal, and other entitlements. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • A study in Soweto, Johannesburg in 2004 showed most urban poor spend about 50% of their expenses in places outside of the towns in which they reside. (wikipedia.org)
  • population
  • The Urban Environment and Population Relocation (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • While population was rising, urban home ownership was declining, from a nation-leading 59.3 percent in 2000 to 52.2 percent in 2012. (wikipedia.org)
  • This network continues to strive to provide quality care to a diverse, multi-ethnic urban population in this era of managed care. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • Philadelphia serves as an example of urban growth, decline, and regrowth along with other industrial cities of the northeast United States: Worcester, Massachusetts, Providence, Rhode Island, Newark and nearby Trenton, New Jersey. (wikipedia.org)
  • goals
  • Whether the goal is to lose weight, gain muscle, or just to become a healthier person, Urban Fitness' friendly staff is there to help everyone real their goals. (galveston.com)
  • network
  • The workshop has successfully increased the understanding, knowledge and capacity on Urban HEART and built a network of practitioners working for urban health. (who.int)
  • The African Food Security Urban Network (AFSUN) found that nearly 70% of poor urban African households sourced part of their food needs from vendors and traders and 79% of these households utilized a supermarket. (wikipedia.org)