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  • Secretary of Agricult
  • The current Secretary of Agriculture is Sonny Perdue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Certain meat inspection regulations promulgated by the Secretary of Agriculture, which deal with the levels of Salmonella in raw meat product, were challenged as beyond the statutory authority granted to the Secretary by the Federal Meat Inspection Act. (lsu.edu)
  • In the 1950s, Henry A. Wallace, former Vice President and former Secretary of Agriculture, and an early developer of hybrid seeds, observed that "the Corn Belt had developed into the most productive agricultural civilization the world has ever seen. (wikipedia.org)
  • farmers
  • It aims to meet the needs of farmers and ranchers, promote agricultural trade and production, work to assure food safety, protect natural resources, foster rural communities and end hunger in the United States and internationally. (wikipedia.org)
  • Business interests sought a Department of Commerce and Industry, and farmers tried to raise the Department of Agriculture to Cabinet rank. (wikipedia.org)
  • Black cotton farmers were very important to entrepreneurs which emerged during industrialization in the United States, particularly Henry Ford. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ralph J. Bunche, an expert in Negro suffrage in the United States, observed in 1940 that "many thousands of black cotton farmers each year now go to the polls, stand in line with their white neighbors, and mark their ballots independently without protest or intimidation, in order to determine government policy toward cotton production control. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2010, the United States Department of Agriculture vowed to pay some forty thousand black farmers $1.2 billion in total, as a compensation for years of undue discrimination. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, federal programs administered through local Soil and Water Conservation Districts provide technical assistance and partial funding to farmers who wish to implement management practices to conserve soil and limit erosion and floods. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the growth of corn has spread to extensive production in 14 states (though it is grown to a lesser extent in all the other US states), a coalition of farmers associations in all these states has been established. (wikipedia.org)
  • This association is known as the Corn Farmers Coalition, which is a union of the National Corn Growers Association and 14 state corn associations (including Iowa Corn). (wikipedia.org)
  • 1930s
  • As a result of the devastating harvest of 1922, some 50,000 black cotton workers left South Carolina, and by the 1930s the state population had declined some 15%, largely due to cotton stagnation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Florida
  • The National Animal Identification System, still a work in progress but headed for mandatory implementation, could have been useful in tracking and containing strangles in Florida and Kentucky, a veterinarian with the United States Department of Agriculture said. (bloodhorse.com)
  • Southern pileated woodpecker (D. p. pileatus) - the southeastern U.S., except Florida Northern pileated woodpecker (D. p. abieticola) - from the Canadian Prairies provinces east through Eastern Canada and the northern United States Florida pileated woodpecker (D. p. floridanus) - the Florida peninsula and Florida Keys Western pileated woodpecker (D. p. picinus) - western North America Their breeding habitat is forested areas across Canada, the eastern United States, and parts of the Pacific coast. (wikipedia.org)
  • Country
  • 34 people who ate at a restaurant, Colonial Park Country Club, developed clinical botulism in the second-largest outbreak in United States history. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the time scientific assessment of conduciveness to grow corn in the United States was undertaken by Meriwether Lewis in 1804, the immigrant settlers had already spread its growth in many parts of the country due to its suitability in varying climatic and soil conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once the suitability of land in the central part of the country, the Midwestern United States, was scientifically established as fertile and rich by Lewis and Clark, settlers moved to the area in large numbers and started growing large corn crops, reaping large benefits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Industry
  • The relationship between the United States Department of Agriculture and the horse industry was a focal point of the recent American Horse Council convention in Washington, D.C. (bloodhorse.com)
  • Statistics released by the Maryland Horse Industry Board show the equine industry in the state has assets worth about $5.6 billion, and that Thoroughbreds lead the way by population of breed. (bloodhorse.com)
  • But talk to people who work in the horse industry every day, and they'll tell you the issue of unwanted horses is serious and so broad it impacts the entire United States, not just the horseracing industry. (bloodhorse.com)
  • The United States Emancipation Proclamation came into power on January 1, 1863, allowing a "new journey for people of African ancestry to participate in the U.S. Agriculture Industry in a new way. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yet the cotton industry continued to be very important for blacks in the southern United States, much more so than for whites. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cotton industry in the United States hit a crisis in the early 1920s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Agriculture is a major industry in the United States, which is a net exporter of food. (wikipedia.org)
  • The year's average daily temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 50.23 °F (10.13 °C), which is the second-lowest ever recorded during those years and slightly milder than 1917's 50.06 °F (10.03 °C). The U.S. Department of Agriculture reported that a freeze in late-December caused $6 million in damages ($152 million today) to the California citrus industry. (wikipedia.org)
  • production
  • The final estimate of corn production for the years 1950 to 1959 in the United States is given as some three billion bushels and in recent years, some nine billion bushels are produced each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • food
  • The Department of Agriculture's Bureau of Home Economics, established in 1923, published shopping advice and recipes to stretch family budgets and make food go farther. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1985 United States salmonellosis outbreak in milk from the Hillfarm Dairy in Melrose Park, Illinois caused 16,284 confirmed, and possibly as many as 200,000 cases of food poisoning in six Midwest states. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on her research on poverty, Pennsylvania State University economic geographer Amy Glasmeier claims that when individuals live at, slightly above, or below the poverty line, unexpected expenses contribute to individuals reducing their food intake. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kingdom
  • Approximately 190 people have died of confirmed cases of vCJD, almost all of them in the United Kingdom. (animallaw.info)
  • Vegetable suet is available in supermarkets in the United Kingdom, made from fat such as palm oil combined with wheat flour (Atora/Tesco) or rice flour (Morrisons). (wikipedia.org)
  • major
  • It created two major agencies it later lost to other departments-the Weather Bureau (1890) and the Office of Road Inquiry (1893)-the latter of which evolved into the massive federal road-building program. (encyclopedia.com)
  • decline
  • However, it wasn't the collapse of prices or pests which resulted in the mass decline of African American employment in agriculture in the American south. (wikipedia.org)
  • Legal
  • Even animals like the alligator and crocodile monitor are legal in some states (both are capable of killing people easily) but a non toxic, non venomous, friendly, leaf eating snail is illegal. (change.org)
  • Development
  • The United States was a leader in seed improvement i.e. hybridization and in expanding uses for crops from the work of George Washington Carver to the development of bioplastics and biofuels. (wikipedia.org)
  • school
  • The biggest school meal program in the United States is the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), which was signed into law by President Harry S. Truman in 1946. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • and that since most of the ice cream produced during the outbreak was distributed outside Minnesota, as many as 224,000 people across the United States became sick. (wikipedia.org)
  • 70 people in several U.S. states were stricken, mostly in the West, and in Canada. (wikipedia.org)
  • Program
  • Starting in the 1840s, Patent Office annual reports began to include large sections related to agriculture, and in the 1850s the office initiated a modest research program. (encyclopedia.com)
  • indicate
  • Epidemiologic and traceback investigations conducted by officials in local, state, and federal public health, agriculture, and regulatory agencies indicate that two ready-to-eat salads, Field Fresh Chopped Salad with Grilled Chicken and Mexicali Salad with Chili Lime Chicken, produced by Glass Onion Catering and sold at Trader Joe's grocery store locations, are one likely source of this outbreak of STEC O157:H7 infections. (foodhaccp.com)
  • The tables below indicate the political party affiliation of elected officials in the U.S. State of Michigan from statehood through January 2011. (wikipedia.org)
  • The tables also indicate the historical party composition in the State Senate, State House of Representatives, the names and party affiliations of Michigan's U.S. Senators, and the party composition of Michigan's delegations to the U.S House of Representatives. (wikipedia.org)
  • local
  • Monetization of U.S. in-kind food aid is the sale of food commodities purchased in and shipped from the United States and sold for local currency in a recipient country by "cooperating sponsors", which are typically U.S.-based non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or recipient governments. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization also called for an end to monetization in The State of Food and Agriculture report in 2006, alleging monetized food aid represents over 30% of project food aid globally and is "often a dangerous way of destroying local farm prices. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • According to a study by Barrett and Lentz, monetization in the United States is driven by the "iron triangle" of producers and processors, the U.S. shipping industry, and NGOs. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • Dr Caitlin Wyrwoll states, "Our work reinforces that vitamin D levels in early life influence brain development and can impact on how the brain functions in later life. (eurekalert.org)
  • FSIS and FDA are continuing to work closely with CDC and state partners during this investigation. (foodhaccp.com)
  • University
  • The University of the Punjab has collaborated with different universities globally and has articulation agreements with the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences of Cornell University and San José State University in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • He earned his bachelor degree in vocational agriculture from Oklahoma State University. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stephen D. Bingham, Early history of Michigan, with biographies of state officers, members of Congress, judges and legislators, pages 665-666, University of Michigan Digital Library Lawrence Kestenbaum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ramsey took his BA at Princeton University in 1936, then took jobs at Harcourt Brace (1936-39), the United States Department of Agriculture (1941-42), and Voice of America (1942). (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • Democrat, then Republican after 1854 Bingham, Stephen D. "Early history of Michigan, with biographies of state officers, members of Congress, judges and legislators. (wikipedia.org)