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  • infection
  • Risk factors implicated in the development of diabetic foot ulcers are infection, older age, diabetic neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, cigarette smoking, poor glycemic control, previous foot ulcerations or amputations, and ischemia of small and large blood vessels. (wikipedia.org)
  • wound
  • Treatment of diabetic foot ulcers should include: blood sugar control, removal of dead tissue from the wound, wound dressings, and removing pressure from the wound through techniques such as total contact casting. (wikipedia.org)
  • diabetic
  • Diabetic foot ulcer is a complication of diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diabetic foot ulcers are classified as either neuropathic, neuroischaemic or ischaemic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prior history of foot disease, foot deformities that produce abnormally high forces of pressure, renal failure, oedema, impaired ability to look after personal care (e.g. visual impairment) are further risk factors for diabetic foot ulcer. (wikipedia.org)
  • perforation
  • Hemorrhage or perforation of peptic ulcers requires emergency medical treatment. (infoplease.com)
  • In certain cases, ulcers can cause additional complications like bleeding, a hole in the stomach called a perforation or an obstruction that prevents food from moving through the stomach. (healthday.com)
  • Because of the possible existence of a cancerous ulcer, or to avoid possible complications such as stomach perforation or penetration into the liver or pancreas, it is recommended the need for this consultation as soon as possible. (botanical-online.com)
  • Deep ulcers extend into or through the stroma and can result in severe scarring and corneal perforation. (wikipedia.org)
  • decubitus
  • Bedsores, also called decubitus ulcers, pressure ulcers, or pressure sores, begin as tender, inflamed patches that develop when a person's weight rests against a hard surface, exerting pressure on the skin and soft tissue over bony parts of the body. (encyclopedia.com)
  • cornea
  • A corneal ulcer is an open sore on the cornea , the thin clear structure overlying the iris (the colored part of the eye ). (webmd.com)
  • Tiny tears to the cornea may also cause corneal ulcers. (webmd.com)
  • Disorders that affect the eyelid and prevent your eye from closing completely, such as Bell's palsy , can dry your cornea and make it more vulnerable to ulcers. (webmd.com)
  • A corneal ulcer is an open sore that forms on the cornea. (healthline.com)
  • A corneal ulcer itself looks like a gray or white area or spot on the usually transparent cornea. (healthline.com)
  • If you have an ulcer on your cornea, your eye doctor will investigate to find out its cause. (healthline.com)
  • As such, an ulcer can impact such areas as the oral cavity and the gastrointestinal tract, the lower extremities, feet, the eyes (most often the cornea), and so forth. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Corneal ulcer is an inflammatory or more seriously, infective condition of the cornea involving disruption of its epithelial layer with involvement of the corneal stroma . (wikipedia.org)
  • Immune-mediated eye disease can cause ulcers at the border of the cornea and sclera . (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • This page provides information, tools, and resources about preventing and treating pressure ulcers (commonly referred to as bed sores). (in.us)
  • pressure ulcers
  • Even the slightest rubbing, called shear, or friction between a hard surface and skin stretched over bones, can cause minor pressure ulcers. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The page also provides information about state quality improvement initiatives related to pressure ulcers. (in.us)
  • penetrated the ep
  • An ulcer is a tissue defect which has penetrated the epithelial- connective tissue border, with its base at a deep level in the submucosa , or even within muscle or periosteum . (wikipedia.org)
  • mouth ulcers
  • Mouth ulcers are very common, occurring in association with many diseases and by many different mechanisms, but usually there is no serious underlying cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mouth ulcers often cause pain and discomfort, and may alter the person's choice of food while healing occurs (e.g. avoiding acidic or spicy foods and beverages). (wikipedia.org)
  • Most mouth ulcers that are not associated with recurrent aphthous stomatitis are caused by local trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mouth ulcers are often tied to bacterial or viral infections. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • NSAIDs
  • If the ulcers are caused by the use of NSAIDs, PPIs are usually prescribed and your doctor will discuss whether you should keep using NSAIDs. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The single most common cause of gastric ulcers is the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The widespread use of NSAIDs is thought to explain why the incidence of gastric ulcers in the United States is rising. (encyclopedia.com)
  • If taken in high daily doses over a long period of time, NSAIDs can cause ulcers in some people. (kidshealth.org)
  • For example, Longe (2006) lists the use of NSAIDS (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) as the single most common cause of gastric ulcers. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Longe (2006) reports that the single most common cause of gastric ulcers is the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDS (aspirin, ibuprofen such as in Advil or Motrin, flubiprofen such as in Ansaid and Ocufen, ketoprofen such as in Orudis, and indomethacin, such as in Indacin). (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • pathogenesis
  • The pathogenesis of stress ulcer is unclear but probably is related to a reduction in mucosal blood flow or a breakdown in other normal mucosal defense mechanisms in conjunction with the injurious effects of acid and pepsin on the gastroduodenal mucosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pathogenesis of corneal ulcers associated with autoinflammatory diseases is not clear. (medscape.com)
  • patients
  • Stress ulcers, as defined by overt bleeding and hemodynamic instability, decreased hemoglobin, and/or need for transfusion, were seen in 1.5% of patients in the 2252 patients in the Canadian Critical Care Trials group study. (wikipedia.org)
  • The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists guideline recommends against the practice of stress ulcer prophylaxis in non-critically ill patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stress ulcer is suspected when there is upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the appropriate clinical setting, for example, when there is upper gastrointestinal bleeding in elderly patients in a surgical intensive care unit (ICU) with heart and lung disease, or when there is upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients in a medical ICU who require respirators. (wikipedia.org)
  • About 95% of patients with duodenal ulcers are infected with H. pylori , as opposed to only 70% of patients with gastric ulcers. (encyclopedia.com)
  • About 30% of patients with gastric ulcers are awakened by pain at night. (encyclopedia.com)
  • About 50% of patients with duodenal ulcers awake during the night with pain, usually between midnight and three a.m. (encyclopedia.com)
  • People with a history of ulcer patients are more likely to suffer from this disease. (botanical-online.com)
  • About five percent of peptic ulcer patients develop perforations: holes in the duodenal or gastric wall through which the contents can leak out into the abdominal cavity (Longe 2006). (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • include
  • Common forms of ulcers recognized in medicine include: Ulcer (dermatology), a discontinuity of the skin or a break in the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Concerns with the use of stress ulcer prophylaxis agents include increased rates of pneumonia and Clostridium difficile colitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • These include Rheumatoid arthritis, rosacea, systemic sclerosis which lead to a special type of corneal ulcer called Mooren's ulcer. (wikipedia.org)