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  • baby turtles
  • The ocean isn't much kinder than the beach, as fish attack the baby turtles, and pollution and fishing nets threaten their survival as they grow. (stanford.edu)
  • The study, conducted by marine biologist George Shillinger at the Stanford-affiliated Center for Ocean Solutions in Monterey, Calif., and a team of colleagues, indicates that strong currents off the coast of Costa Rica may help whisk the baby turtles to safer habitats. (stanford.edu)
  • Because the baby turtles are so small, Shillinger and his team used computer models to simulate the path of the turtles rather than deploying satellite tags or radio transmitters. (stanford.edu)
  • Shillinger said now that researchers have an idea of where the baby turtles disperse, they can seek them out through surveys and potentially through tracking studies to test their hypotheses in the real world rather than just through a computer model. (stanford.edu)
  • Hawaiian Islands
  • Her current research projects include using mitochondrial DNA as well as microsatellites to look at parentage and relatedness in green turtles nesting on the main Hawaiian Islands, as well as Kemps Ridleys nesting on South Padre Island in Texas. (noaa.gov)
  • Nesting
  • The study shows that there are areas in this world that are special for the leatherback and if you destroy the nesting beach, you take away from the turtles a very important launch pad," he said. (stanford.edu)
  • genetically
  • One major field effort that Kelly leads (in St. Croix, USVI) focuses on genetically fingerprinting hatchling leatherback turtles as they leave the beach after emerging from their nests, for the purpose of determining the age to maturity for leatherbacks. (noaa.gov)
  • reptiles
  • Turtles are reptiles - a group of animals that includes snakes, lizards, crocodiles, and alligators - which have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years. (emporia.edu)
  • genetics
  • Amy Frey is a Research Biologist for the Marine Turtle Genetics Program. (noaa.gov)
  • Toward the end of my college career, I began working for the Marine Turtle Research Group (now the Marine Turtle Genetics Group and Marine Turtle Ecology and Assessment Groups) as a part-time student worker. (noaa.gov)
  • My role in the Marine Turtle Genetics Group utilizes lab techniques such as DNA extraction and Polymerase Chain Reaction to process tissue samples we receive from turtle populations all around the world. (noaa.gov)
  • While receiving a BS degree in Ecology, Behavior and Evolution from University of California, San Diego, Erin joined the Marine Turtle Genetics Program in 2000. (noaa.gov)
  • Kelly Stewart, Ph.D., is a Marine Biologist with the Marine Turtle Genetics Program. (noaa.gov)
  • She now works on various genetics projects on marine turtles as well as participating in a number of field programs. (noaa.gov)
  • Lisa Komoroske is a Marine Biologist with the Marine Turtle Genetics Program. (noaa.gov)