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  • primary tumour
  • Cancer that spreads from the first place it started (called the primary tumour) to a new part of the body is called metastatic cancer . (cancer.ca)
  • These methods suffer from inherent limitations such as the need to control immune response in the transplant animal, and the significant difference in environmental conditions from the primary tumour site to the xenograft site (e.g. absence of required exogenous molecules or cofactors). (wikipedia.org)
  • There is often more than one primary tumour. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Because the tumours occur mainly in young men, preservation of reproductive function, quality of life after treatment, and late effects are crucial concerns. (nih.gov)
  • Brenner tumours very rarely can occur in other locations, including the testes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evolution of the initial tumour cell may occur by two methods: Sequentially ordered mutations accumulate in driver genes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repair enzymes, resulting in clonal expansion of tumour cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the tumour can occur at any age, it occurs most often in young adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • The staging system for these tumours is the same as for epithelial tumours and most present as stage I. The peak age at which they occur is 50-55 years, but they may occur at any age. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the ovaries of aging squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus), clusters of granulosa cells occur that resemble granulosa cell tumours in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • This similarity excludes composite rhabdoid tumours, which occur mainly in adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regardless of location, all rhabdoid tumours are highly aggressive, have a poor prognosis, and tend to occur in children less than two years of age. (wikipedia.org)
  • These are rare tumours that can occur in any part of the human body. (wikipedia.org)
  • rare tumours
  • Therefore,we owe it to our patients with rare tumours that we use the knowledge gained in the treatment of the more common cancers to provide them with a better future. (springer.com)
  • As « rarity » is too often synonymous with isolation, it is hoped that this book will contribute to increasing and spreading the knowledge about rare tumours in order to better manage our patients with innovative approaches. (springer.com)
  • His main interests are head and neck cancer, colorectal cancer and haematological malignancies with a special interest in rare tumours in these sites. (springer.com)
  • As no, or very little, prospective clinical research is carried out on rare tumours, it is important to gather and communicate our findings to improve the outcome of our patients. (springer.com)
  • cancers
  • It said that in a trial in 31 patients with skin cancers, the tumours shrank by at least 30% in the first two weeks. (www.nhs.uk)
  • However, the results indicate a parallel "significant reduction in risk" of tumours on the other side of the head, from which the researchers concluded that there is currently insufficient evidence to indicate whether the phenomenon is a real effect or may simply be a case of tumour sufferers attributing their cancers to their mobile phone usage. (theregister.co.uk)
  • In solid cancers, such as brain cancer, the abnormal cells form a mass or lump called a tumour. (cancervic.org.au)
  • His clinical research interests include the management of breast and gynaecologic cancers, hematologic malignancies, rare tumour management and the development of new technologies in radiation oncology. (springer.com)
  • His main research interests are brain tumours and rare cancers. (springer.com)
  • ovarian
  • They are common neoplasms with a strong tendency to bilaterality, and they account for 50% of all ovarian tumours. (wikipedia.org)
  • Leydig
  • However, hormonal disturbances, in Leydig tumours, is present in only 2/3 of cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reinke crystals are classically found in these tumours and help confirm the diagnosis, although they are seen in less than half of all Leydig cell tumours. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunohistochemical markers of Leydig cell tumours include inhibin-alpha, calretinin, and melan-A. The usual chemotherapy regimen has limited efficacy in tumours of this type, although Imatinib has shown some promise. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because in many cases Leydig cell tumour does not produce elevated tumour markers, the focus of surveillance is on repeated physical examination and imaging. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms
  • The symptoms depend on the specific location of the tumour, which can be anywhere in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other symptoms depend on their age and the type of tumour. (wikipedia.org)
  • Few other neurological deficits are associated with DNTs, so that earlier detection of the tumour before seizure symptoms are rare. (wikipedia.org)
  • HeadSmart aims to educate the public and healthcare professionals about the signs and symptoms of brain tumours in children and young people, to reduce diagnosis times, to save lives and to reduce long term disability. (wikipedia.org)
  • suppressor
  • In MRTs, the INI1 gene (SMARCB1)on chromosome 22q functions as a classic tumour suppressor gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, the N-terminal domain of TCTP inhibits apoptosis by binding to apoptotic factors and by inhibiting p53 tumour suppressor-dependent apoptosis by downregulating it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ultrasound
  • Ultrasound: Ultrasound can be used to initially assess a tumour that is located superficially in either the submandibular or parotid gland. (wikipedia.org)
  • This approach involves an inguinal or scrotal incision and ultrasound guidance if the tumour is non-palpable. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • Alongside safety and pharmokinetics (i.e. how the drug is absorbed in the body), the researchers assessed the anti-tumour effects based on certain criteria that depend on imaging of the tumour (using X-ray, CT or MRI). (www.nhs.uk)
  • The researchers say that they have established that the maximum tolerated dose of the new drug is 960mg twice a day and that in patients who had tumours with a BRAF mutation, the drug had demonstrated anti-tumour effects. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The researchers interviewed 966 people, aged 18 to 69 years, with glioma brain tumours and 1,716 randomly selected healthy individuals. (theregister.co.uk)
  • The researchers aim to increase understanding of the brain cells from which GBMs originate: how this tumour type develops from normal cells, and which genes and biological functions control its behaviour. (wikipedia.org)
  • Led by Mr Kevin O'Neill, a consultant neurosurgeon at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, a team of world-class researchers are investigating the biology of tumour metabolisms to further understand the behaviour of this disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers sampled 25 tumours and found that the tumours were genetically identical. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • His biology research topics include radiosensitivity markers in tumours and healthy tissues and combinations of targeted therapies and new drugs with ionising radiation. (springer.com)
  • Later rhabdoid tumours outside the kidney were reported in many tissues including the liver, soft tissue, and the central nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunohistochemical
  • PECs bear significant histologic and immunohistochemical similarity to: angiomyolipoma, clear-cell sugar tumour (CCST), lymphangioleiomyomatosis, and, clear-cell myomelanocytic tumour of ligamentum teres/falciform ligament. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • The first results from early-stage trials show that cancer drugs couriered by nanoparticles may reduce the size of tumours in humans. (newscientist.com)
  • Their research focuses on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most aggressive type of brain tumour found in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • adults
  • Children are much more prone to exhibit these dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumours than adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • Led by Professor Oliver Hanemann, the Plymouth University centre conducts research into low-grade brain tumours occurring in teenagers and adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnose - diagnosing brain tumours earlier and more accurately for both children and adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • The charity works, has worked, and continues to work with a number of medical and research institutes, laboratories and universities looking for cures to defeat brain tumours, as well as treatments for both adults and children. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Brain Tumour Charity is the only national brain tumour charity to provide a variety of information and support services which allow people personally affected by brain tumours to access support online, face to face, on the phone or in printed form across the UK, regardless of tumour type, age or location, for both adults and children. (wikipedia.org)
  • The research investigated the lived experience of adults with a brain tumour. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Children with choroid plexus tumours commonly have a buildup of CSF (hydrocephalus), which causes increased pressure on the brain and an increase in skull size. (cancer.ca)
  • Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour, commonly abbreviated DNT or DNET, is a type of brain tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • A dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour is commonly diagnosed in patients who are experiencing seizures with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalogram (EEG). (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the cell of origin is not known, cytogenetic studies have suggested a common genetic basis for rhabdoid tumours regardless of location with abnormalities in chromosome 22 commonly occurring. (wikipedia.org)
  • The translationally controlled tumour protein, commonly known as TCTP, is a highly conserved protein among many eukaryotic organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • histologic
  • The histologic differential diagnosis includes: calcifying fibrous pseudotumour inflammatory fibroid tumour nodular fasciitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The histologic diagnosis of malignant rhabdoid tumour depends on identification of characteristic rhabdoid cells-large cells with eccentrically located nuclei and abundant, eosinophilic cytoplasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • arise
  • In this model, tumours arise from a single mutated cell, accumulating additional mutations as it progresses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic heterogeneity is a common feature of tumour genomes, and can arise from multiple sources. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other findings suggest that DNTs require a reclassification to associate them with oligodendrogliomas, tumours that arise from solely glial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Granulosa cell tumours (or granulosa-theca cell tumours or folliculoma) are tumours that arise from granulosa cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • renal
  • There are many forms of kidney tumours: The most frequent, malignant, primary kidney cancer is renal cell carcinoma (RCC) - which has several subtypes: Clear cell RCC. (wikipedia.org)
  • apoptosis
  • 2002) Tumour‐associated B7‐H1 promotes T‐cell apoptosis: a potential mechanism of immune evasion. (els.net)
  • androgens
  • If it is secreting androgens the tumour is usually asymptomatic, but can cause precocious puberty in pre-pubertal boys. (wikipedia.org)