Loading...
  • ancestral
  • The research established that modern Indians of all castes are descended from two ancestral groups. (amren.com)
  • The other ancient population are the Ancestral Southern Indians (ASI), who are not genetically close to any group outside the sub-continent. (amren.com)
  • Understanding their origins provides a window on to the history of the Ancestral South Indians, and the period tens of thousands of years ago when they diverged from other Eurasians. (amren.com)
  • Mr. Trujillo is one of many Latinos who are finding ancestral connections to a flourishing slave trade on the blood-soaked frontier now known as the American Southwest. (nytimes.com)
  • Louise Erdrich on why ancestral history is central to the existence of Native Americans, and why protecting that valuable history is so important. (pbs.org)
  • Though its members may live on the reservation, participate in tribal ceremonies and even study their ancestral language, they are not eligible for a range of federal and tribal benefits, from subsidized health care and tribal voting rights to job preference and the right to gather eagle feathers. (hcn.org)
  • Chickasaw Nation
  • The partnership allows OMRF scientist-physicians to visit tribal clinics in Ada (Chickasaw Nation) and Muskogee (Cherokee Nation) and to work with health care providers there to administer rheumatology care. (ardmoreite.com)
  • We're lucky to work with excellent doctors like Fabio Mota, M.D., and Tina Cooper, M.D., of the Chickasaw Nation, and others who are so dedicated to providing top-notch patient care to our tribal communities," James said. (ardmoreite.com)
  • Scientists
  • Scientists have found 'markers' in human genes that they call Native American markers because they believe all 'original' Native Americans had these genetic traits On the mitochondrial DNA, there are a total of five different 'haplotypes' which are increasingly called 'Native American markers,' and are believed to be a genetic signature of the founding ancestors. (manataka.org)
  • The genetic profiles typical of modern castes are indistinguishable from those of much older tribal groups, Indian and American scientists have found. (amren.com)
  • A partnership between the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and the Chickasaw and Cherokee Nations is providing more rheumatology care to tribal clinics while helping scientists better understand the role race plays in rheumatoid arthritis and related diseases. (ardmoreite.com)
  • Nations
  • Both must be committed to honoring the long-standing treaty obligations that the United States has to provide adequate health care services to Indigenous tribal nations. (prrac.org)
  • From 1778 to 1871, the Indigenous nations, of what is now referred to as the United States of America, negotiated and signed nearly 400 treaties with this nation. (prrac.org)
  • Council
  • A Wyoming Arts Council Roster Artist since 2002, GRANT MONEY has been regularly awarded Presenters to assist in Bunny Sings Wolf's performance fees within the States of Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota and Nevada. (bunnysingswolf.com)
  • descendants
  • This result indicates that many modern Indian groups are descended from a small number of "founding individuals", whose descendants interbred among themselves to create genetically isolated populations. (amren.com)
  • ancestors
  • Therefore, Native American ancestors on other lines are invisible. (manataka.org)
  • Making America tells the story of the peopling of the New World, of how land came to define the settling and identity of America, and of how the guests' ancestors were part of this history. (pbs.org)
  • Louise Erdrich talks about the fractious relationship between European settlers and her American Indian ancestors. (pbs.org)
  • American Indians/Alaska Natives have a common bond only because their ancestors predate the European settlers. (nih.gov)
  • groupings
  • Genetic profiling shows that the structure of Indian society today reflects early social groupings, not just colonialism India's caste system is not a relic of colonialism but has existed in some form for thousands of years, the most comprehensive study yet of the genetic diversity of the sub-continent has suggested. (amren.com)
  • identity
  • Some tribal decision-makers display healthy skepticism as they talk about the complicated nature of identity, family, and community. (manataka.org)
  • More often, tribal enrollment and identity questions center around two issues that DNA cannot inform: cultural affiliation and the distribution of money and services. (manataka.org)
  • A second problem with tying markers to Native American identity is that mitochondrial DNA and Y marker testing show only one line of ancestry each. (manataka.org)
  • Native American identity is a complex and contested issue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike the Mohawk, the Ojibwe are patrilineal, tracing their tribal identity through their fathers, so it seems likely that George would have thought of himself as African-American rather than Ojibwe. (teachinghistory.org)
  • Mexican
  • The trade endured even decades after the Mexican-American War, when the United States took control of much of the Southwest in the 1840s. (nytimes.com)
  • Persons of Mexican birth or ancestry who are not definitely of Indian or other nonwhite race are classified as white. (socialexplorer.com)
  • Therefore
  • He used the 1924 Racial Integrity Act to classify Virginia Indians and mixed-race individuals as "colored," and therefore denied basic civil rights under Virginia's system of segregation. (melungeon.org)
  • slaves
  • St. Thomas the Apostle Church in Abiquiú, N.M., a village settled by former Indian slaves, or Genízaros, in the 18th century. (nytimes.com)
  • Many Indian slaves remained in bondage when Mexico and later the United States governed New Mexico. (nytimes.com)
  • Colonists initially took local Pueblo Indians as slaves, leading to an uprising in 1680 that temporarily pushed the Spanish out of New Mexico. (nytimes.com)
  • Douglass remarked that American slaves thought themselves the most forsaken of God's children, until they met the American Indian. (teachinghistory.org)
  • health
  • Funding for the research is provided by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences through its Native American Research Centers for Health, part of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number U261IHS0049-03. (ardmoreite.com)
  • In fulfilling this obligation it must ensure that there is sufficient funding for tribal and Indian Health Service programs, staffing, technology, research and facility construction, modernizing and maintenance. (prrac.org)
  • The unmet health needs of the American Indian people are severe and the health status of Indians is far below that of the general population of the United States. (prrac.org)
  • We used International Classification of Diseases-9 (ICD-9) codes to search two Indian Health Service (IHS) patient registration databases over the years 1998-2000, searching for individuals 19 years of age or younger with specific ICD-9-specified diagnoses. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Chronic arthritis in childhood represents an important, though unrecognized, chronic health challenge within the American Indian population living in the United States. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Because both our clinical experience here in Oklahoma suggests that rheumatic diseases in children may also be more prevalent in the American Indian population compared with Caucasians, we undertook a search of the Oklahoma City Indian Health Service (IHS) user population databases in order to develop prevalence estimates of rheumatic diseases in American Indian children and adolescents. (biomedcentral.com)
  • African American
  • One such person is Joseph Louis Cook, the son of an African-American father and an Abenaki mother who had both been taken captive by the Iroquois. (teachinghistory.org)
  • at least one of their children, George, also worked in the fur trade and is known as the first African-American born in Minnesota. (teachinghistory.org)
  • Whereas the men mentioned above were probably born free, Attucks was likely born a slave and that status may have influenced his identification as an African-American. (teachinghistory.org)
  • Certainly he is remembered as one of our African-American heros of the American Revolution, and his Native ancestry is underemphasized. (teachinghistory.org)
  • McNabb W, Quinn M, Kerver J, Cook S, Karrison T. The PATHWAYS church-based weight loss program for urban African-American women at risk for diabetes . (nih.gov)
  • identify
  • The American Geriatrics Society provides the Beers Criteria (PDF, 561 KB) to identify medications, including some common diabetes medications, which may be potentially inappropriate in older adults. (nih.gov)
  • race
  • Her other research interests include tribal criminal and juvenile justice systems and race and crime. (docplayer.net)
  • federal
  • The blood quantum often was determined in crude ways such as sending anthropologists and federal agents to inspect Native Americans' physical features, like hair, skin color and nose shape. (deseretnews.com)
  • In 1956 the federal government officially recognized the Lumbees but withheld customary Indian benefits and services. (encyclopedia.com)
  • 1 Panel #1: Overview of American Indian Children and Youth in Tribal, State, and Federal Juvenile Justice Systems. (docplayer.net)
  • Highlight common systemic challenges in federal, state, and tribal systems and offer recommendations to address them. (docplayer.net)
  • Her 2011 article, The Promise of Mancari: Indian Political Rights as Racial Remedy, focused on bridging gaps between civil rights law, federal Indian law, and indigenous rights. (docplayer.net)
  • Professor Goldberg has written widely about federal Indian law and tribal law, and is co author of Cohen s Handbook of Federal Indian Law (1982, 2005, and 2012 editions). (docplayer.net)
  • Approximately half of the Indigenous population resides on or near federal "Indian" reservations, while the remaining half reside in urban areas. (prrac.org)
  • prominent
  • Cook himself was raised in the Mohawk community and played a prominent role fighting on behalf of the Continental Army during the American Revolution. (teachinghistory.org)
  • common
  • This may explain why several genetic conditions are more common in India than elsewhere: a mutation in a gene called MYBPC3, which raises the risk of heart failure sevenfold, is found in 4 per cent of Indians but is exceptionally rare elsewhere. (amren.com)
  • But the common shared ancestry and rampant ANI/ASI mixture may be the strong, invisible thread that binds all Indians. (amren.com)
  • Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA). (encyclopedia.com)
  • The disease affects 1.5 million Americans and is more common in both females and American Indian populations. (ardmoreite.com)
  • As an adult, Ryan will face a dilemma that is increasingly common in Indian Country. (hcn.org)
  • A common requirement for such enrollment at present is that the proportion of Indian blood should be at least one-fourth. (socialexplorer.com)
  • research
  • The specifics of Paleo-Indians migration to and throughout the Americas, including the exact dates and routes traveled, are subject to ongoing research and discussion. (thefullwiki.org)
  • I have many years of research experience and I am currently obtaining my Master's degree in Library and Information Science from The Catholic University of America. (archives.gov)
  • early
  • While some early Native American populations were tabulated by missionary priests and colonial authorities, specific examples of such tallies have not been located. (ancestry.com)
  • For many years, this was the only higher educational institution available for the Lumbees, and from 1940 to 1953, Pembroke State College (which grew out of the early normal school) was the only state-supported four-year college for Indians in the United States . (encyclopedia.com)
  • Because they must deal with rheumatoid arthritis so often, it's important for doctors servicing American Indian populations to be well versed in early diagnosis and a variety of treatment options. (ardmoreite.com)
  • Apache Indians (probably from ápachu, 'enemy,' the Zuñi name for the Navaho, who were designated "Apaches de Nabaju" by the early Spaniards in New Mexico). (accessgenealogy.com)