Loading...
  • rejection
  • The team transplanted a new windpipe with tissue grown from her own stem cells and did not need to administer anti-rejection drugs, according to the case report, published in the December 2008 Lancet. (go.com)
  • If you received donor cells, you will get antibiotics and anti-rejection drugs to help your body accept the transplanted cells. (webmd.com)
  • If these could be removed, cultivated in larger quantities, supplied with genes to produce the necessary substances, and then transplanted back into the diseased eye, there would be no problems of rejection and no ethical problems involving fetal stem cells. (innovations-report.com)
  • This is a major step forward for regenerative medicine, bringing us ever closer to treatment that goes beyond repairing damaged tissue and offers the possibility of rejection-free organs and tissues for transplant," Dr. Paulo De Coppi, who leads stem cells and regenerative medicine research at ICH and co-lead on the new research, said in a press release . (upi.com)
  • underwent
  • Both patients underwent the transplant in early July and were released from the hospital just weeks after the surgery , according to the Associated Press. (go.com)
  • The study included patient s ages 16 to 60 years who underwent transplants in the United States during a six-year period ending in 2001. (innovations-report.com)
  • researchers
  • Researchers from Lund University, Sweden, have now developed a method to improve the quality of the transplanted cells using ultrasound for cell separation. (innovations-report.com)
  • Japanese researchers have last week transplanted stem cells into a patient's brain as part of an experimental therapy for Parkinson's disease. (news-medical.net)
  • In 2009, a different team of researchers led by scientists from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil and Northwestern University reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association that they were able to successfully reverse type 1 diabetes by injecting 8 patients with some of their own stem cells. (ibtimes.com)
  • Researchers for the first time have grown a functional esophagus from stem cells and transplanted it successfully in mice, which they think could one day be used to treat cases of Esophageal atresia. (upi.com)
  • Oct. 18 (UPI) -- Researchers for the first time have grown a functional esophagus from stem cells and transplanted the food pipe successfully in mice. (upi.com)
  • Researchers used a rat esophagus "scaffold" and human gut cells to grow engineered tubes of esophagus. (upi.com)
  • The researchers noted, though, that stem cell transplant was riskier. (medicinenet.com)
  • leukemia
  • A 42-year-old HIV patient with leukemia appears to have no detectable HIV in his blood and no symptoms after a stem cell transplant from a donor carrying a gene mutation that confers natural resistance to the virus that causes AIDS. (slashdot.org)
  • lymphoma
  • All surviving patients had a complete or partial resolution of the condition they were transplanted for, e.g. lymphoma was cured, gastrointestinal disease resolved or lung disease ameliorated. (aaaai.org)
  • In contrast, CVID patients transplanted for lymphoma had a better survival rate (83%, 5/6 patients) and all surviving patients were cured from the lymphoma. (aaaai.org)
  • GVHD
  • For unknown reasons, in CVID patients the frequency and severity of GVHD was higher than expected, based on other studies transplanting non-CVID patients. (aaaai.org)