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  • grafts
  • Studies performed by this Program have defined the temporal relationship of viral infection to the success of tolerance induction and to the durability of healed-in grafts. (grantome.com)
  • The Program will be supported by a Virology and Technology Core that will provide viruses, virological and immunological analyses and new technologies to identify and quantify alloreactive T cells and by a Mouse and Transplantation Core that will provide necessary mouse resources, perform and train Program personnel in transplantation, and monitor infected animals and grafts in biocontainment. (grantome.com)
  • thymus
  • Later developed new tolerogenic strategies have provided strong evidence to re-evaluate the phenomenon of T cell mediated suppression, in particular the use of non-depleting anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, demonstrating that neither thymus nor clonal deletion is necessary to induce tolerance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thymus transplantation can be used to treat infants with DiGeorge syndrome, which results in an absent or hypoplastic thymus, in turn causing problems with the immune system's T-cell mediated response. (wikipedia.org)
  • Theoretically, thymus transplantation could cause two types of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD): First, it could cause a donor T cell-related GVHD, because of T cells from the donor that are present in the transplanted thymus that recognizes the recipient as foreign. (wikipedia.org)
  • Autoimmune disease is a frequent complication after human allogeneic thymus transplantation, found in 42% of subjects over 1 year post transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • During central tolerance, T-cells are selected in the thymus and allowed to enter the periphery based on the ability of the T-cell to recognize self-peptides (via its TCR) being presented in the context of self-MHC. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tolerance is classified into central tolerance or peripheral tolerance depending on where the state is originally induced-in the thymus and bone marrow (central) or in other tissues and lymph nodes (peripheral). (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulatory T Cel
  • Here we found that islet transplantation in the testis, an immunologically privileged site, generates much less memory CD8 + T cells but induces more Ag-specific CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells than in a conventional site. (jimmunol.org)
  • Today, it is well established that CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are indispensable for maintaining immunological self-tolerance. (frontiersin.org)
  • The data suggest that the tolerated kidneys and cells have regulatory effects, likely due to regulatory T cells that can induce and maintain tolerance. (bu.edu)
  • The potency and efficacy of regulatory T cells has been shown in our study and could potentially be exploited to provide for therapies to induce and maintain tolerance. (bu.edu)
  • Such tolerance is antigen-specific, mediated by regulatory T cells, and can be extended through linked suppression to naïve lymphocytes. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Such data question whether CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells alone can account for the antigen specificity of dominant transplantation tolerance. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Regulatory T cells produce anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β which ensures the allograft tolerance. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • She is President of the American society for Reconstructive Transplantation and is past president of the International Hand and Composite Tissue Allotransplantation Society and the American Society for Peripheral Nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some of her contributions are: The Know-How of Face Transplantation Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Face to Face: My Quest to Perform the First Full Face Transplant Transplanting a Face: Notes on a Life in Medicine Tissue Surgery (New Techniques in Surgery Series) Personal Profile at Cleveland Clinic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immune tolerance, or immunological tolerance, or immunotolerance, is a state of unresponsiveness of the immune system to substances or tissue that have the capacity to elicit an immune response in given organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • costimulatory
  • While positive costimulatory signals promote T cell proliferation and differentiation into effector phenotypes, negative signals lead to arrest of T cell responses and promote regulation and tolerance. (frontiersin.org)
  • immune system
  • Because second-generation tolerance arises in the absence of any monoclonal antibodies to CD4 or CD8, it probably represents a natural response of the immune system, which, once initiated, becomes self-sustaining. (wikipedia.org)
  • With his doctoral student Leslie Brent and postdoctoral fellow Rupert E. Billingham, he demonstrated the principle of acquired immunological tolerance (the phenomenon of unresponsiveness of the immune system to certain molecules), which was theoretically predicted by Sir Frank Macfarlane Burnet. (wikipedia.org)
  • Short Course Immune Induction Therapy or SCIIT, is a therapeutic strategy employing rapid, specific, short term-modulation of the immune system using a therapeutic agent to induce T-cell non-responsiveness, also known as operational tolerance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immune tolerance can be defined as the ability of the immune system to distinguish between self and non-self, or harmless and harmful. (wikipedia.org)
  • Central tolerance is the main way the immune system learns to discriminate self from non-self. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antibodies
  • Recipient's blood already contains circulating antibodies before the transplantation - either IgM or antibodies incurred by previous immunization (e.g. by repeated blood transfusion). (wikipedia.org)
  • kidney
  • The NHPCSG is a multi-center, cooperative program for research on nonhuman primate (NHP) models of kidney, pancreatic islet, heart, and lung transplantation. (nih.gov)
  • This FOA and the companion FOA ( RFA-AI-16-008 ) solicit single project (U01) and multi-project (U19) cooperative agreement applications for milestone-based research projects focused on NHP models of kidney, pancreatic islet, heart, and/or lung transplantation tolerance to achieve the goals listed above. (nih.gov)
  • At the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre and I.W.K. Hospital for Children he engaged himself for 24 years in kidney, liver and pancreas transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • stem
  • Accordingly, mesenchymal stem cells, regulatory myeloid cells, T regulatory cells, and other cell types are being tested as possible routes to tolerance induction, in the absence of donor-derived stem cells. (frontiersin.org)
  • Tolerance-based stem cell transplantation using sublethal conditioning is being considered for the treatment of human disease, but safety and efficacy remain to be established. (umassmed.edu)
  • Graft-versus-host-disease-associated oral cancer may have more aggressive behavior with poorer prognosis, when compared to oral cancer in non-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • high-dose
  • Three-year outcomes from an ongoing clinical trial suggest that high-dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by transplantation of a person's own blood-forming stem cells may induce sustained remission in some people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). (technologynetworks.com)
  • director
  • In 1969, he was appointed Associate in Medicine at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and permanently moved to Montreal, Canada in 1970 to become Director of the Transplantation Service at the Royal Victoria Hospital and McGill University Clinic and Associate Professor of Medicine, McGill University Faculty of Medicine. (wikipedia.org)