Loading...
  • soluble
  • Increased erythropoietic activity causes TfR synthesis to be upregulated and thereby increase the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) level. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) measurements (5-14) have enabled efficient detection of early iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), the treatment of which is essential, especially during phases of psychomotor development, rapid growth, and pregnancy (15-18). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The initial focus of the agreement will serve to expand Beckman Coulter's leadership position in Anemia testing to include Erythropoietin, a principal cytokine factor regulating red blood cell production, and Soluble Transferrin Receptor (STFR), which is considered the best indicator of iron deficiency. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The introduction of new laboratory tests, especially soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), has enabled the identification of storage iron depletion, iron-deficient erythropoiesis, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and functional ID as readily distinguishable clinical conditions (1-5). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) has been introduced as a promising new diagnostic tool for differentiating between iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of chronic disease (ACD) (1-3). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Because the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentration is not influenced by acute-phase reactions, it remains within reference values in patients with anemia of chronic disease. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Carbohydrate Deficient T
  • Carbohydrate deficient transferrin increases in the blood with heavy ethanol consumption and can be monitored through laboratory testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a laboratory test used to help detect heavy ethanol consumption. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin is elevated in the blood of heavy alcoholism but raised levels can also be found in a number of medical conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Used with other tests, such as gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), carbohydrate-deficient transferrin can be a useful tool in identifying problem drinking, such as alcohol abuse or alcoholism. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • In nephrotic syndrome, urinary loss of transferrin, along with other serum proteins such as thyroxine-binding globulin, gammaglobulin, and anti-thrombin III, can manifest as iron-resistant microcytic anemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • receptor gene
  • Our results suggest the existence of another mechanism of regulation for transferrin receptor gene expression not so far considered. (epfl.ch)
  • Furthermore, the distinction between the mechanism of regulation exerted by IFN gamma and that exerted by cell proliferation on transferrin receptor gene expression suggests that, in WISH cells, the IFN-induced transferrin receptor decay is not a consequence of cell growth arrest but rather one of the causes of the antiproliferative effect of IFN through iron deprivation. (epfl.ch)
  • affinity
  • Transferrin has a molecular weight of around 80 kDa and contains two specific high-affinity Fe(III) binding sites. (wikipedia.org)
  • The affinity of transferrin for Fe(III) is extremely high ( association constant is 10 20 M −1 at pH 7.4) but decreases progressively with decreasing pH below neutrality. (wikipedia.org)
  • saturation
  • Transferrin saturation, measured as a percentage, is a medical laboratory value. (wikipedia.org)
  • Normal reference ranges are: Serum iron: 60-170 μg/dL (10-30 μmol/L) Total iron-binding capacity: 240-450 μg/dL Transferrin saturation: 15-50% (males), 12-45% (females) μg/dL = micrograms per deciliter μmol/L = micromoles per liter Laboratories often use different units and "normal" may vary by population and the lab techniques used. (wikipedia.org)