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  • Iodine
  • For more information about I-131 releases and the ATSDR Oak Ridge public health assessment visit http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/HAC/Oakridge/phact/iodine/index.html or contact Jack Hanley at 770/ 488-0736 or call 1-800-CDC-INFO. (cdc.gov)
  • fumes
  • On June 20, 2014, in response to increasing reports of workers falling ill after chemical vapors escaped from the tanks, Ferguson and Governor Jay Inslee wrote to the U.S. Secretary of Energy urging an independent safety assessment of workers exposed to the vapors and toxic fumes emitted from the Hanford tanks. (wa.gov)
  • wastes
  • In addition, former defense sites can pose hazards such as unsafe buildings, a variety of toxic and radioactive wastes, and ordnance and explosive compounds. (gao.gov)
  • Badger, in this case, is a former Army ammunition plant near the town of Sauk Prairie, Wisconsin - a sprawling industrial complex that operated from World War II through the mid-1970s and produced not only munitions, but a flood of toxic wastes. (motherjones.com)
  • The strategy also called for Congress to state "that munitions deposited and remaining on operational ranges are not 'solid wastes'" - a move that with one stroke would exempt the Pentagon from having to clean up the old shells, fuels, and other weapons "constituents" that turn places like Badger into health hazards. (motherjones.com)
  • evidence
  • Such studies of DU have not yet been completed, and scientists and doctors say as a result there is still very limited credible "direct epidemiological evidence" connecting DU to negative health effects. (foreignpolicy.com)
  • exposure to toxic
  • The 2014 report was the latest in a series of studies over the last 20 years assessing the problem of Washington workers falling sick after exposure to toxic gases emitted from the waste holding tanks. (wa.gov)
  • physical
  • 1. The States Parties to the present Covenant recognize the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. (ohchr.org)
  • Assessment
  • Historical air monitoring data from the 1950s and deer thyroid data collected between 1979 and 1989 were supplied to ATSDR during Public Health Assessment research of I-131 releases from the X-10 Site. (cdc.gov)
  • persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) and very persistent and very bioaccumulative (vPvB) assessment. (europa.eu)
  • emissions
  • PSR-LA works to protect vulnerable communities by reducing emissions that harm human health and speed global climate change. (psr-la.org)
  • Naturally
  • There, radioactive isotopes occur naturally in the bedrock, especially in the Marcellus Shale formation that stretches from West Virginia to New York. (nrdc.org)
  • birth defects
  • The airstrikes on oil trucks in Islamic State-controlled areas employed the toxic material, which has been accused of causing cancer and birth defects. (foreignpolicy.com)
  • The air assaults mark the first confirmed use of this armament since the 2003 Iraq invasion, when it was used hundreds of thousands of times, setting off outrage among local communities, which alleged that its toxic material caused cancer and birth defects. (foreignpolicy.com)
  • substance
  • This approach simulates the time course of contaminant tissue concentrations in humans by dividing the body into a series of compartments based on how quickly they take up and release the substance. (learner.org)
  • chemical
  • Another hazard soldiers stationed at Fort McClellan faced came from the Monsanto chemical plant located just down the road from the base. (norrisinjurylawyers.com)
  • Explosives and blasting agent (not including Class C explosives) - "Explosive" means a chemical that causes a sudden, almost instantaneous release of pressure, gas, and heat when subjected to sudden shock, pressure, or high temperature. (springfieldmich.com)
  • Flammable solid - A solid, other than a blasting agent, or explosive, that is liable to cause fire through friction, absorption or moisture, spontaneous chemical change, or retained heat from manufacturing or processing, or which can be ignited readily and when ignited burns so vigorously and persistently as to create a serious hazard. (springfieldmich.com)
  • Production of weapons for World War II and the Cold War left behind large amounts of solid and liquid chemical waste - much of which is also radioactive. (wa.gov)
  • potentially
  • So when news broke in early 2016 that the local landfill had for months been illegally burying 1,900 tons of radioactive-and potentially carcinogenic-material, this tight-knit community was shocked. (nrdc.org)
  • nuclear
  • These questions are difficult to answer in the chaos and context of an ongoing disaster, and they become even more complicated by the fact that governments and the nuclear industry maintain tight control of information, operations, scientific research, and the biomedical lessons that shape public-health response. (truthout.org)
  • This regulation of information has been the case since the nuclear age began, and understanding this helps to illuminate why there is no clear consensus on what Japan's nuclear disaster means in terms of local and global human health. (truthout.org)
  • Such omission is a standard industry practice, designed to reassure the public that the normal operating procedures of a nuclear power plant represent no significant threat to human health. (truthout.org)
  • The following excerpts, from a talk ( starting 5 pages hence ) given in L.A. in 1989 by Dr. Rosalie Bertell, President of the International Institute of Concern for Public Health based in Toronto, Canada, articulates some of the history and medical consequences of the new "fire" (nuclear energy) we as a species have begun to "play with" since the 1940s. (ratical.org)
  • The solid waste that's left in the [nuclear power] plant, that they don't just release, they put into trenches and bury them. (ratical.org)
  • In November 2014, Attorney General Ferguson filed a notice of intent to sue the U.S. Department of Energy for its ongoing failure to ensure the health and safety of the Washington workers involved in the Hanford nuclear site cleanup. (wa.gov)
  • PSR-LA's founding mission to protect public health from nuclear threats is as urgent today as it ever was. (psr-la.org)
  • environment
  • Although I-131 released during RaLa processing is no longer present in the environment, the current radioactivity of I-129 in the soil can be used to evaluate past I-131 concentrations. (cdc.gov)
  • DOD is obligated to ensure that former defense sites are cleaned up to a level that is protective of human health and the environment. (gao.gov)
  • The lawsuit is brought under the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which was passed by Congress to protect human health and the environment from hazardous waste. (wa.gov)
  • In April, EPA enforcement chief John Suarez told Congress that the Pentagon's proposals to ease hazardous-waste regulations were "appropriate" and in line with "existing EPA policy" - even though only weeks earlier, a report from Suarez's own staff to the President's Office of Management and Budget had specifically warned against relaxing the waste rules, noting that the munitions could present "an imminent and substantial endangerment of health or the environment. (motherjones.com)
  • The purpose of this regulation is to ensure a high level of protection of human health and the environment. (europa.eu)
  • tanks
  • Ore mined deep in the Australian desert and shipped to Malaysia would be mixed with powerful acids to make a slightly radioactive slurry that would be pumped through the tanks, with operating temperatures of about 200 degrees Fahrenheit. (blogspot.de)
  • thousand
  • When I was on the committee for the Environmental Protection Agency they had identified seventy-four thousand toxic waste dumps in the United States. (ratical.org)
  • soil
  • In recent years, it has also backed away from a plan to remove large volumes of contaminated soil from the base, proposing instead to fence off and monitor the toxic hot spots. (motherjones.com)
  • crisis
  • By 2050, antibiotic-resistant infections - a health crisis directly attributable to industrial farming - may kill 10 million people worldwide each year. (fourwinds10.com)
  • natural
  • the number of children and grandchildren with cancer in their bones, with leukemia in their blood, or with poison in their lungs might seem statistically small to some, in comparison with natural health hazards, but this is not a natural health hazard--and it is not a statistical issue. (ratical.org)
  • As coal, oil, and natural gas are burned worldwide, smokestacks of electricity-generating plants, industrial boilers and smelters release sulfur dioxide (SO2) arid nitrogen oxides. (rawfoodexplained.com)
  • asbestos
  • While the number of injuries on the job are down for firefighters these days, asbestos still remains a major threat to these workers' health. (martindale.com)
  • serious
  • New York City Council Member Stephen Levin stated "Last weekend's 7-alarm fire has raised serious health concerns for residents in North Brooklyn and it is crucial that the City does everything in its power to address these concerns. (nag-brooklyn.org)
  • But when we are exposed to crude oil, it can put our health at risk and pose serious environmental dangers . (norrisinjurylawyers.com)
  • So that bodes the possibility of some serious health consequences. (blogspot.ca)
  • dose
  • They may also estimate dose, although if there is a known relationship between exposure to a specific hazard and how the body responds, a study may simply estimate the target group's exposure and use existing knowledge to calculate the average dose members have received. (learner.org)
  • present
  • ORRHES Public Health Work Group (PHAWG) will present a health statistics review of the Tennessee Cancer Registry data. (cdc.gov)
  • safety
  • Aside from the most recent fire in Williamsburg, most of these events have gone under-reported and little to no public information was released regarding the potential health and safety hazards presented by these fires. (nag-brooklyn.org)
  • This reassurance of health safety was echoed when hydrogen gas explosions occurred at the power plant. (truthout.org)
  • f) The right to protection of health and to safety in working conditions, including the safeguarding of the function of reproduction. (ohchr.org)
  • public
  • The petition calls on the De Blasio administration to take the lead in developing and implementing a more comprehensive environmental and public health plan as a response to the fire and future commercial/industrial fires like it. (nag-brooklyn.org)
  • However, as a public health precaution, the agency suggests residents limit eating certain types of local fish. (cdc.gov)
  • hydrogen
  • In fact, the hydrogen released is tritium water vapor, a low-level emitter that can be absorbed in a human body through simply breathing, or by drinking contaminated water. (truthout.org)