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  • Regenerative Medicine
  • The term regenerative medicine is often used synonymously with tissue engineering, although those involved in regenerative medicine place more emphasis on the use of stem cells or progenitor cells to produce tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scaffold
  • Tissue engineering involves the use of a tissue scaffold for the formation of new viable tissue for a medical purpose. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1996, the first use of regenerative tissue was used to replace a small length of urethra, which led to the understanding that the technique of obtaining samples of tissue, growing it outside the body without a scaffold, and reapplying it, can be used for only small distances of less than 1 cm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biology
  • The Eugene Bell Center for Regenerative Biology and Tissue Engineering was established in 2010 through the extraordinary leadership gifts of Millicent Bell and John and Valerie Rowe. (mbl.edu)
  • In doing so, however, I have treated cursorily many important aspects of connective tissue biology that appeared to be only indirectly relevant to the principal questions asked. (springer.com)
  • Tissue may refer to: Tissue (biology), a tissue is an ensemble of similar cells from the same origin that together carry out a specific function Tissue paper, a type of thin, translucent paper used for wrapping and cushioning items Facial tissue, a type of thin, soft, disposable paper used for nose-blowing. (wikipedia.org)
  • gTissue is a type of living Tissue (biology), hence an ensemble of cells and extracellular matrix that carry out a particular function. (wikipedia.org)
  • At this stage the material has been adopted and has the characteristics of a living tissue (biology). (wikipedia.org)
  • The continued success of tissue engineering, and the eventual development of true human replacement parts, will grow from the convergence of engineering and basic research advances in tissue, matrix, growth factor, stem cell, and developmental biology, as well as materials science and bio informatics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since Haberlandt's original assertions, methods for tissue and cell culture have been realized, leading to significant discoveries in biology and medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue culture is an important tool for the study of the biology of cells from multicellular organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Xylem Phloem Cork cambium Vascular cambium Vascular plant Stele (biology) Circulatory system Intro to Plant Structure Contains diagrams of the plant tissues, listed as an outline. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitro
  • In modern usage, tissue culture generally refers to the growth of cells from a tissue from a multicellular organism in vitro. (wikipedia.org)
  • It provides an in vitro model of the tissue in a well defined environment which can be easily manipulated and analysed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eric Simon, in a 1988 NIH SBIR grant report, showed that electrospinning could be used to produced nano- and submicron-scale polymeric fibrous scaffolds specifically intended for use as in vitro cell and tissue substrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Extracellular Matrices
  • Scientific advances in biomaterials, stem cells, growth and differentiation factors, and biomimetic environments have created unique opportunities to fabricate tissues in the laboratory from combinations of engineered extracellular matrices ("scaffolds"), cells, and biologically active molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • fascia
  • The subcutaneous tissue (from Latin subcutaneous, meaning 'beneath the skin'), also called the hypodermis, hypoderm (from Greek, meaning 'beneath the skin'), subcutis, or superficial fascia, is the lowermost layer of the integumentary system in vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hematopoietic
  • In hematopoietic and lymphatic tissues, reticular fibers made by reticular cells provide the stroma-or structural support-for the parenchyma-or functional part-of the organ. (wikipedia.org)
  • cartilage
  • Play media While most definitions of tissue engineering cover a broad range of applications, in practice the term is closely associated with applications that repair or replace portions of or whole tissues (i.e., bone, cartilage, blood vessels, bladder, skin, muscle etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cartilage: lab-grown tissue was successfully used to repair knee cartilage. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Hygienic tissue paper is commonly used for facial tissue (paper handkerchiefs), napkins, bathroom tissue and household towels. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term is commonly used to refer to the type of facial tissue, usually sold in boxes, that is designed to facilitate the expulsion of nasal mucus although it may refer to other types of facial tissues including napkins and wipes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue specialised for food storage is commonly formed of parenchyma cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue culture commonly refers to the culture of animal cells and tissues, with the more specific term plant tissue culture being used for plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • intercellular
  • The precise amount and composition of these intercellular "cementing" substances varies, depending on the type of tissues. (everything2.com)
  • There are four main types of collenchyma: Angular collenchyma (thickened at intercellular contact points) Tangential collenchyma (cells arranged into ordered rows and thickened at the tangential face of the cell wall) Annular collenchyma (uniformly thickened cell walls) Lacunar collenchyma (collenchyma with intercellular spaces) Collenchyma cells are most often found adjacent to outer growing tissues such as the vascular cambium and are known for increasing structural support and integrity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hard tissue (also termed calcified tissue) is tissue which is mineralized and has a firm intercellular matrix. (wikipedia.org)
  • fluid
  • Scar tissue and fluid retention can make breast tissue appear a little firmer or rounder than before surgery and/or radiation. (breastcancer.org)
  • Fat in the lower body, as in thighs and buttocks, is subcutaneous and is not consistently spaced tissue, whereas fat in the abdomen is mostly visceral and semi-fluid. (wikipedia.org)
  • These two tissues transport fluid and nutrients internally. (wikipedia.org)
  • fibers
  • When taut, these fibers produce a strong growth in tissue stiffness. (wikipedia.org)
  • A contusion is the discoloration of the skin, which results from underlying muscle fibers and connective tissue being crushed.This can happen in a variety of ways such as a direct blow to the skin, or a fall taken against a hard surface.The discoloration in the skin is present when blood begins to pool around the injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • All connective tissue consists of three main components: fibers (elastic and collagenous fibers), ground substance and cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Types of fibers: Connective tissue has a wide variety of functions that depend on the types of cells and the different classes of fibers involved. (wikipedia.org)
  • Japanese tissue is a thin, strong paper made from vegetable fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The majority of mending tissues are made from kōzo fibers, though mitsumata and gampi papers also are used. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fibers in these feathered edges will allow the tissue to have a firmer hold on the mended paper and also to blend in with it once dried. (wikipedia.org)
  • This early use of electrospun fibrous lattices for cell culture and tissue engineering showed that various cell types would adhere to and proliferate upon polycarbonate fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was noted that as opposed to the flattened morphology typically seen in 2D culture, cells grown on the electrospun fibers exhibited a more rounded 3-dimensional morphology generally observed of tissues in vivo. (wikipedia.org)
  • subcutaneous
  • It is often referred to as subcutaneous tissue though this is a less precise and anatomically inaccurate term. (wikipedia.org)
  • Subcutaneous fat is the layer of subcutaneous tissue that is most widely distributed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Injection into the subcutaneous tissue is a route of administration used for drugs such as insulin: because it is highly vascular, the tissue absorbs drugs quickly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Just as the subcutaneous tissue can store fat, it can also provide good storage space for drugs that need to be released gradually because there is limited blood flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanical
  • Human soft tissue is highly deformable, and its mechanical properties vary significantly from one person to another. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order to describe the mechanical response of soft tissues, several methods have been used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite the independence of strain rate, preconditioned soft tissues still present hysteresis, so the mechanical response can be modeled as hyperelastic with different material constants at loading and unloading. (wikipedia.org)
  • Often, the tissues involved require certain mechanical and structural properties for proper functioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • vivo
  • Tissue nanotransfection (TNT) an in vivo research technique that its creators claim reprograms skin cells into other cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • Nervous tissue is made up of different types of nerve cells, all of which have an axon . (wikipedia.org)
  • Nervous tissue is composed of neurons , also called nerve cells, and neuroglial cells . (wikipedia.org)
  • Neuroglia encompasses the non-neural cells in nervous tissue that provide various crucial supportive functions for neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells are joined together in tissues that may be either striated or smooth, depending on the presence or absence, respectively, of organized, regularly repeated arrangements of myofibrillar contractile proteins called myofilaments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Generative Tissue (gTissue) is a living tissue created in a patient (human or non-human) by a surgeon, consisting of an extracellular matrix, cells, and supporting vascular supply with generative properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • Essentially, the gTissue is created by implanting certain types of non-inflammatory ECM biomaterials that are adopted by the host, including repopulation with host cells and blood vessels, becoming a living tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue tropism is the cells and tissues of a host that support growth of a particular virus or bacterium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some bacteria and viruses have a broad tissue tropism and can infect many types of cells and tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Parenchyma forms the "filler" tissue in the soft parts of plants.usually present in cortex, pericycle, pith,and medullary rays in primary stem and root.2) Collenchyma cells have thin primary walls with some areas of secondary thickening. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some works the cells of the leaf epidermis are regarded as specialised parenchymal cells, but the modern preference has long been to classify the epidermis as plant dermal tissue, and parenchyma as ground tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • shapes of parenchyma 1= polyhedral[these cells are most poly hedral shape] 2=stellate (found in stem of plants and have well developed air spaces between them) 3=elongated(are found in pallisade tissue of leaf) 4=lobed (are found inspongy and pallisade mesophyyll tissue of some plants) The first use of "collenchyma" (/kəˈlɛŋkɪmə, kɒ-/) was by Link (1837) who used it to describe the sticky substance on Bletia (Orchidaceae) pollen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Collenchyma tissue is composed of elongated cells with irregularly thickened walls. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone is an active tissue composed of different cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue engineering is the use of a combination of cells, engineering and materials methods, and suitable biochemical and physicochemical factors to improve or replace biological tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Doris Taylor's heart in a jar Tissue-engineered airway Tissue-engineered vessels Artificial skin constructed from human skin cells embedded in a hydrogel, such as in the case of bioprinted constructs for battlefield burn repairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial bone marrow Artificial bone Laboratory-grown penis Oral mucosa tissue engineering Foreskin Tissue engineering utilizes living cells as engineering materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue culture is the growth of tissues or cells separate from the organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • He suggested that the potentialities of individual cells via tissue culture as well as that the reciprocal influences of tissues on one another could be determined by this method. (wikipedia.org)
  • In animal tissue culture, cells may be grown as two-dimensional monolayers (conventional culture) or within fibrous scaffolds or gels to attain more naturalistic three-dimensional tissue-like structures (3D culture). (wikipedia.org)
  • The cells in vascular tissue are typically long and slender. (wikipedia.org)
  • This tissue divides off cells that will become additional xylem and phloem. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • In addition to the membrane-bound tissue factor, soluble form of tissue factor was also found which results from alternatively spliced tissue factor mRNA transcripts, in which exon 5 is absent and exon 4 is spliced directly to exon 6. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the central nervous system (CNS), the tissue types found are grey matter and white matter . (wikipedia.org)
  • Here you can find out all about soft tissue sarcomas in adults, including risk factors, symptoms, how they are found, and how they are treated. (cancer.org)
  • Connective tissue is found in between other tissues everywhere in the body, including the nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another type of relatively undifferentiated connective tissue is mucous connective tissue, found inside the umbilical cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another tissue study found inconsistent results with different paper, but said that tissue paper generally demonstrated an undesirable effect known as "comb filtering", where the high frequencies are reflected back into the tweeter instead of being absorbed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Erectile tissue is also found in the nose (turbinates), ear, urethral sponge and perineal sponge. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vascular tissue is a complex conducting tissue, formed of more than one cell type, found in vascular plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biological
  • It attempts to answer some general questions about the biological organization of the tissues: What is the nature of this organization at various dimensional levels? (springer.com)
  • body
  • Most U.S. tissue bank companies get their supply of cadaver tissue through Willed Body Donation programs run by the tissue bank itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • The American Association of Tissue Banks (AATB) is the most recognized accrediting body for American tissue banks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Common soft tissue injuries usually occur from a sprain , strain , a one off blow resulting in a contusion or overuse of a particular part of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mission: Unbreakable features custom tissue quality, flexibility, and mobility/activation circuits and soundtracks to bulletproof your body, maximize results, and improve performance. (tradebit.com)
  • However, gTissue is created surgically, grown in a patient, and has a unique cellular and biochemical make-up that make it distinct from other tissues of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Erectile tissue is tissue in the body with numerous vascular spaces that may become engorged with blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • soft
  • subjects with more soft tissue thickness tended to absorb the impacts with less aversion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Graph of lagrangian stress (T) versus stretch ratio (λ) of a preconditioned soft tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Soft tissues have the potential to undergo large deformations and still return to the initial configuration when unloaded, i.e. they are hyperelastic materials , and their stress-strain curve is nonlinear . (wikipedia.org)
  • The soft tissues are also viscoelastic , incompressible and usually anisotropic . (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though soft tissues have viscoelastic properties, i.e. stress as function of strain rate, it can be approximated by a hyperelastic model after precondition to a load pattern. (wikipedia.org)
  • The soft tissue is completely torn, and functionality and strength on the joint is completely compromised. (wikipedia.org)
  • The RICE method is an effective procedure used in the initial treatment of a soft tissue injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • If you have a soft tissue sarcoma or are close to someone who does, knowing what to expect can help you cope. (cancer.org)
  • Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials for Soft Tissue Repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • Facial tissue (paper handkerchiefs) refers to a class of soft, absorbent, disposable paper that is suitable for use on the face. (wikipedia.org)
  • from Greek παρέγχυμα parenkhyma, "visceral flesh" from παρεγχεῖν parenkhein, "to pour in" from παρα- para-, "beside", ἐν en-, "in" and χεῖν khein, "to pour") is a versatile ground tissue that generally constitutes the "filler" tissue in soft parts of plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term is in contrast to soft tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac
  • By contrast, aerobic exercise can produce beneficial cardiac tissue remodeling in those suffering from left ventricular hypertrophy. (wikipedia.org)
  • undergo
  • Enamel is avascular and has no nerve supply within it and is not renewed, however, it is not a static tissue as it can undergo mineralization changes. (wikipedia.org)
  • active tissue
  • For example, when created to below the skin of the face in cosmetic procedures intended to add bulk, the gTissue is adopted and stays a living, metabolically active tissue, subdermally. (wikipedia.org)
  • Basic Principle
  • In 1885 Wilhelm Roux removed a section of the medullary plate of an embryonic chicken and maintained it in a warm saline solution for several days, establishing the basic principle of tissue culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • bones
  • Unwilling to leave the dry bones of Agnosticism wholly unclothed with any living tissue of religious emotion. (everything2.com)
  • blood
  • The best known function of tissue factor is its role in blood coagulation . (wikipedia.org)
  • The process can either change the characteristics of a tissue such as in blood vessel remodeling, or result in the dynamic equilibrium of a tissue such as in bone remodeling. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, tissue that is devoid of or otherwise lacking erectile tissue (such as the labia minora, the vestibule/vagina and the urethra) may also be described as engorging with blood, often with regard to sexual arousal. (wikipedia.org)