Loading...
  • moral
  • Third, we will review the various positions on the moral standing of human embryos, seeking again to outline the chief fault lines in that continuing debate. (georgetown.edu)
  • And finally, we will highlight some critical ethical concerns that do not arise directly out of the debate over the moral standing of human embryos but that may be no less important to the larger question confronting the country. (georgetown.edu)
  • issues
  • Here, we take up arguments on all sides of the issue-including those that dispute the understanding of the policy put forward by its authors and those that raise other issues or alternative courses of action. (georgetown.edu)
  • stem-cell res
  • He explains the processes involved in stem-cell research, research cloning, and reproductive cloning. (brightkite.com)
  • However, adult stem cell research has been very successful, leading to numerous cures in both animals and humans. (romeofthewest.com)
  • And everyone should, because stem-cell research brings up issues like where your tax money goes, who you vote for, your family's health and even your most fundamental beliefs about what makes us human. (wired.com)
  • HCPI executive director, Bernard Siegel stated, "It is the widespread belief of leading scientists and medical researchers that failure to proceed with SCNT stem cell research is the equivalent to turning our backs on one of the greatest potential medical advances of our time and would thereby destroy the hope for understanding and treatment of many deadly diseases and conditions. (innovations-report.com)
  • In 2004, Japan 's Council for Science and Technology Policy voted to allow scientists to conduct stem cell research for therapeutic purposes, though formal guidelines have yet to be released. (pewforum.org)
  • South Korea 's reputation as a leader in stem cell research suffered a significant blow in 2006 when it was discovered that the country's leading biomedical researcher, Dr. Hwang Woo-suk, falsely claimed that he was the first scientist to clone human embryonic stem cells for the purpose of clinical trials. (pewforum.org)
  • Despite the scandal, the South Korean government continues to promote therapeutic cloning for stem cell research, although reproductive cloning is forbidden. (pewforum.org)
  • Belgium is widely recognized by the international scientific community as an enthusiast of stem cell research, and Belgian scientists successfully extracted stem cell lines from cloned embryos in 2005. (pewforum.org)
  • Most notably, debates of the ethical or unethical nature of abortion, cloning, and stem cell research have arisen. (essaypride.com)
  • Since research began in 1998 with the first extraction of human embryonic stem cells by Dr. James Alexander Thompson in his laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, scientists have proposed many exciting possibilities as a result of stem cell research. (essaypride.com)
  • The measure specifically bans human cloning, but would permit all federally allowed stem cell research in the state. (chipbennett.net)
  • In November 2004, California voters passed a ballot measure providing $3 billion for stem cell research to find cures for a plethora of degenerative diseases. (icr.org)
  • If these cells can provide a cure for many who suffer from degenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and diabetes, why would anyone object to stem cell research and its applications? (icr.org)
  • Look, if they were really interested in cures, they'd be talking about adult stem cell research, which shows far more promise-not creating embryos to destroy them for medical experiments. (ama-assn.org)
  • Any stem cell research that requires the destruction of human life is unethical. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • Curiously, absent from The Times' coverage was any mention of three women, including me, who participated in the panel discussion, which leads one to wonder whether the editors of The Times, for all their championing of women's rights, actually believes that women's voices should be heard in this debate (`` Stem cell research debated,'' Oct. 11). (freerepublic.com)
  • embryos created
  • Moreover, The Times wrongly assumed we declined to ``consistently'' answer what it calls one ``key question'' regarding the ``logic and human dignity in routine discarding of embryos created in fertility clinics. (freerepublic.com)
  • 1997
  • Here we are Aug. 8, 1997 at ABS Global in DeForest, Wisconsin where they have just announced the cloning of three bull calves. (hawkhill.com)
  • Parkinson's
  • Many prominent individuals made pleas for the passage of this measure including California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, former First Lady Nancy Reagan, and actors Michael J. Fox, who suffers from Parkinson's Disease (PD), and Christopher Reeve, who died recently of complications from a spinal cord injury suffered several years ago. (icr.org)
  • pigs
  • These pigs would become illegal under the Brownback bill, because they mingle a blessedly human H-transferase gene with pig cells. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • tissues
  • Theoretically, tissues generated from cells cloned from a patient's own adult nucleus should not trigger an immune response, but it is possible that subtle differences caused by the foreign cytoplasm in the donor egg might cause a rejection response. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The cells can be collected and coaxed into various tissues for the treatment of, for example, heart disease. (romeofthewest.com)
  • These newly formed tissues are then implanted into the patient in order to cure this disease are of (Stem Cell Therapy). (beautyobservatory.gq)
  • By definition, stem cells are capable of self-renewal and differentiating into many cell types to form tissues in humans and other organisms. (icr.org)
  • H) a non-human life form engineered such that it contains a human brain or a brain derived wholly or predominantly from human neural tissues. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • Therapeutic cloning is the cloning of human tissues for research and transplant, and shows much promise in organ transplantation. (loja3d.com)
  • Theoretically
  • The following background paper highlights BIO's perspective on the difference between using cloning technology to theoretically clone a human being and the beneficial uses of cloning technology in medicine and agriculture. (bio.org)
  • AD, that is theoretically possible (although nobody has yet grown a human clone, as far as we know). (whyfiles.org)
  • experimentation
  • The very suggestion of such human experimentation strikes fear in the hearts of all who remember the atrocities of the Nazi regime's "scientific experimentation" on human subjects and desire to create the Aryan super race. (inciid.org)
  • organs
  • subhuman creatures with usable organs but no head, no brain, no consciousness to identify them with the human family? (brightkite.com)
  • Some believe that it is possible to grow human organs outside a body, or perhaps in the body of another animal, that could then be harvested for transplanting into humans. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • The idea is to create animals that can be a source for xenografts transplanted organs in humans with a reduced level of rejection. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • Body Shopping describes a science that has become positively vampiric in its insatiable appetite for human tissue and organs, sometimes outright stealing the raw material it needs. (thenewatlantis.com)
  • favor
  • That is why almost everyone who has staked out a position in the debate about cloning including those who do not accept Dr. Kass s argument that cloning is inherently wrong because it transforms procreation into a form of production favor a ban on cloning to produce children, at least until the day comes (if it ever comes) when cloning can be done safely. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • And no one, we trust, would favor forced abortions for women who become pregnant with cloned children. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • species
  • A human individual brought into existence by cloning would be a member of the species homo sapiens. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • At the deepest level, cloning should be prohibited because it turns procreation into a species of manufacture. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • Clones have been produced in several other species like mice and calves, but in every species in which cloning has been successful in producing live offspring, there has been a high incidence of abnormalities in the offspring. (inciid.org)
  • But wait, while all of these creatures reproduce asexually through cloning, creating an exact replica of themselves, the cloning of more complex species, such as humans, still seems unnatural to many of us. (mtholyoke.edu)
  • What is prohibited is the manipulation of human life at its earliest stages by introducing animal DNA, implanting human embryos into other species (and vice versa) and creating animals with mostly human brain tissue. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • Does this interaction with and nurturing of human cells by another species have theological implications? (bu.edu)
  • abortion
  • However, at the breakfast, he found out that abortion, euthanasia, cloning, and animal rights are all share the same negative philosophy of humanity. (romeofthewest.com)
  • Biotechnology has emerged forcefully in recent years with such technologies as abortion, cloning, and genetic modification, abortion being the only one of these that has so far been successful. (essaypride.com)
  • Marley Gibbons-Balfour Case Study: Biology Contents Introduction 1 Background Science 2 Arguments against 4 Arguments for 7 Summary 10 Conclusion 11 Bibliography 12 Introduction Cloning has quickly become one of the most contentious issues in modern society, along with other issues like abortion, homosexuality and euthanasia. (markedbyteachers.com)
  • Business and medical leaders strongly support the measure while religious and anti-abortion leaders have campaigned against it, saying the procedure amounts to human cloning . (chipbennett.net)
  • nucleus
  • Many of us know by now that putting a skin cell-or other non-reproductive system cell-into an egg cell from which the nucleus has been removed is exactly what cloning is. (ama-assn.org)
  • Therapeutic cloning is a procedure in which cells, typically skin cells, are taken from a patient and inserted into a fertilized egg whose nucleus has been removed. (loja3d.com)
  • promise
  • Human embryonic stem cells offer the promise of a new regenerative medicine in which damaged adult cells can be replaced with new cells. (jci.org)
  • However, the word "promise" must be underscored - to date, no cures have been realized, no disease mechanisms have been uncovered, and no new drugs have been developed. (jci.org)
  • Many in the international scientific community believe that the promise of stem cell-based studies or therapies will be realized only if we can derive new human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines. (jci.org)
  • ethics
  • This was all done before much debate had been had over the ethics of human cloning. (scribd.com)
  • Reproductive Technologies, Ethics, and the Law. (mtholyoke.edu)
  • Mount Holyoke Associate Professor of Chemistry Sean Decatur will moderate as panelists debate the ethics of reproductive technologies from historical, political, and legal standpoints. (mtholyoke.edu)
  • The TV spot, nevertheless, provoked responses nearly as tangled in ethics and identity as the cloning issue itself. (ama-assn.org)
  • patient's
  • However, even cloning doesn't create an exact genetic equivalent, since the egg cell itself has its own genetics and composition, different from the patient's mother. (romeofthewest.com)
  • India has established a booming industry in stem cell banking, which involves storing a patient's stem cells with the aim of possibly using them for future medical treatments. (pewforum.org)
  • sperm
  • When the sperm and egg unite, they form a cell with two copies of the total DNA necessary for a human being to develop (diploid). (cbhd.org)
  • reproduce
  • In nature, plants often reproduce themselves by cloning. (hawkhill.com)
  • The ad is part of a larger initiative by CuresNow and others to redefine cloning so that it applies only to activities that attempt to reproduce a living, brought-to-term human being. (ama-assn.org)
  • defines
  • The initiative intentionally re-defines "cloning" in a manner inconsistent with any biological, scientific, or other reasonable understanding or definition of the term. (chipbennett.net)