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  • inpatient therapeutic
  • A subset of therapeutic foods, ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs), are energy-dense, micronutrient-enriched pastes that have a nutritional profile similar to the traditional F-100 milk-based diet used in inpatient therapeutic feeding programs and are often made of peanuts, oil, sugar and milk powder. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, development of 'mini' therapeutic communities, meeting for three or fewer days each week and supported out of hours by various forms of 'service user led informal networks of care' (for example telephone, texting and physical support), now offers a more resource and cost effective alternative to traditional inpatient therapeutic communities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Krieger
  • Dr. Dolores Krieger, a nursing professor at New York University, and a healer named Dora Kunz created Therapeutic Touch in the 1960s-70s as a way to establish a more personal relationship between nurses and patients. (unh.edu)
  • Dr. Krieger learned the technique from Kunz, and began teaching it as Therapeutic Touch to her graduate students. (unh.edu)
  • Dora Kunz, a theosophy promoter and one-time president (1975-1987) of the Theosophical Society in America, and Dolores Krieger, now Professor Emerita of Nursing Science, New York University, developed therapeutic touch in the 1970s. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to Krieger, therapeutic touch has roots in ancient healing practices, such as the laying on of hands, although it has no connection with religion or with faith healing. (wikipedia.org)
  • frac
  • In Dr. Okonofua's original paper, this patient's therapeutic inertia is calculated as h v − c v {\displaystyle {\frac {h}{v}}-{\frac {c}{v}}} where h is the number of visits with an uncontrolled condition, c is the number of visits in which a change was made, and v is the total number of visits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic Index = L D 50 E D 50 {\displaystyle {\mbox{Therapeutic Index}}={\frac {\mathrm {LD} _{50}}{\mathrm {ED} _{50}}}} in animal studies, or for humans, Therapeutic Index = T D 50 E D 50 {\displaystyle {\mbox{Therapeutic Index}}={\frac {\mathrm {TD} _{50}}{\mathrm {ED} _{50}}}} For many drugs, there are severe toxicities that occur at sublethal doses in humans, and these toxicities often limit the maximum dose of a drug. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • in 1987 was the following: "To maintain a therapeutic misconception is to deny the possibility that there may be major disadvantages to participating in clinical research that stem from the nature of the research process itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Certain factors can increase the risk of therapeutic misconception, such as studies that are similar to clinical care in terms of research design or when subjects have a limited scope of available treatment, such as a terminal phase cancer patient who is not responsive to known treatments. (wikipedia.org)
  • What separates therapeutic misconception from therapeutic misestimation is that in therapeutic misestimation subjects overestimate the benefits of a trial even though they properly understand how research procedures differ from the care they would otherwise receive in clinical practice settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic inertia (also known as clinical inertia) is a measurement of the resistance to therapeutic treatment for an existing medical condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers at the University of Oxford and King's College London studied a national democratic therapeutic community service over four years and found external policy 'steering' by officials eroded the community's democratic model of care, which in turn destabilised its well established approach to clinical risk management (this had been jointly developed by clients and staff). (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] In the late 1960s within the US correctional system, the Asklepion Foundation initiated therapeutic communities in the Marion Federal Penitentiary and other institutions that included clinical intervention based upon Transactional Analysis, the Synanon Game, internal twelve-step programs and other therapeutic modalities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers have also begun to examine therapeutic assessment for children and families, and have demonstrated clinical effectiveness in many settings, including schools, children's hospitals, and various clinics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interventions
  • The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support the efficient pilot testing of novel psychosocial therapeutic and preventive interventions for mental disorders in adults and children, using an experimental therapeutics approach. (nih.gov)
  • minimize
  • Strategies to minimize therapeutic misconception include giving a clear description of the research procedures and goals (e.g. explaining study design, treatment allocation and the possibility of receiving a placebo since the allocation is randomized) and having a comprehensive discussion, with the subject, about the voluntary nature of participation and of available alternatives. (wikipedia.org)
  • To maximize the therapeutic effects and minimize the side effects of any treatment, recognition and quantification of the situation, in multiple dimensions, is a critical prerequisite. (wikipedia.org)
  • practitioners
  • While little in the way of scientific research exists on Therapeutic Touch, studies carried out by practitioners show that the therapy maybe useful for treating stress-related conditions, boosting the immune system, relieving pain, healing wounds and increasing the ability of red blood cells to carry oxygen to through the body. (unh.edu)
  • There is no formal certification process by which Therapeutic Touch practitioners are licensed, and the Nurse Healers-Professional Associates International suggests that you look for someone who practices regularly, has completed at least 12 hours of training in Therapeutic Touch, and has been practicing for a minimum of five years. (unh.edu)
  • Therapeutic touch (commonly shortened to "TT"), known by some as "non-contact therapeutic touch" (NCTT), is a pseudoscientific energy therapy which practitioners claim promotes healing and reduces pain and anxiety. (wikipedia.org)
  • Practitioners of therapeutic touch state that by placing their hands on, or near, a patient, they are able to detect and manipulate what they say is the patient's energy field. (wikipedia.org)
  • One highly cited study, designed by the then-nine-year-old Emily Rosa and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1998, found that practitioners of therapeutic touch could not detect the presence or absence of a hand placed a few inches above theirs when their vision was obstructed. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the help of Stephen Barrett from Quackwatch, and with the assistance of her mother, Linda Rosa, RN, Emily became the youngest research team member to have a paper accepted by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) for her part in a study of therapeutic touch, which debunked the claims of therapeutic touch practitioners. (wikipedia.org)
  • Twenty-one practitioners of therapeutic touch participated in her study, and they attempted to detect her aura. (wikipedia.org)
  • TJ researchers and practitioners typically make use of social science methods and data to study the extent to which a legal rule or practice affects the psychological well-being of the people it affects, and then explore ways in which anti-therapeutic consequences can be reduced, and therapeutic consequences enhanced, without breaching due process requirements. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • It is commonly measured as a percentage of the number of encounters in which a patient with a condition received new or increased therapeutic treatment out of the total number of visits to a health care professional by the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Therapeutic angiogenesis is an experimental area of treatment of ischemia, the condition which associated with decrease in blood supply to certain body organs, tissue or part This usually caused by constriction or obstruction of the blood vessels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Allison McKim used the term therapeutic governance to describe the governmentality of alcohol and drug treatment, whereby treatment works as a type of responsibilizing governance in producing and managing a rational, self-interested subject. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic inertia was devised as a metric for measuring treatment of hypertension. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the other hand, a therapeutic garden is "designed for use as a component of a treatment program such as occupational therapy, physical therapy, or horticultural therapy programs and can be considered as a subcategory of a healing garden. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to Robert E. Cooke, the word therapeutic means "pertaining to treatment or healing. (wikipedia.org)
  • What constitutes a therapeutic effect versus a side effect is a matter of both the nature of the situation in which a treatment is used and the goals of treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are many situations in which the effects of a treatment, both those often viewed as both desirable and undesirable can be used in combination with other treatments in a complex strategy so that, for the individual being treated, the best end results actually depend on side effects contributing to the overall therapeutic benefit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic nihilism is a contention that it is impossible to cure people or societies of their ills through treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • I will apply for the benefit of the sick, all measures [that] are required, avoiding those twin traps of over-treatment and therapeutic nihilism. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Britain, 'democratic analytic' therapeutic communities have tended to specialise in the treatment of moderate to severe personality disorders and complex emotional and interpersonal problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • The evolution of therapeutic communities in the United States has followed a different path with hierarchically arranged communities (or concept houses) specialising in the treatment of drug and alcohol dependence. (wikipedia.org)
  • TDM is recommended for use in the treatment of psychiatric disorders with lithium due to its narrow therapeutic range. (wikipedia.org)
  • Traditional, information-gathering assessment is sometimes viewed as the phase before treatment, whereas therapeutic assessment can be considered the first phase of treatment or as a brief standalone treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research has also found that the gains in therapeutic alliance due to therapeutic assessment are related to significantly more positive alliances throughout treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic endoscopy (also known as 'interventional gastroenterology' or 'interventional endoscopy') is the medical term for an endoscopic procedure during which treatment is carried out via the endoscope. (wikipedia.org)
  • physicians
  • The Classification of Pharmaco-Therapeutic Referrals ( CPR ) is a taxonomy focused to define and group together situations requiring a referral from pharmacists to physicians (and vice versa) regarding the pharmacotherapy used by the patients . (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a simple and efficient classification of pharmaco-therapeutic referrals between physicians and pharmacists permitting a common inter-professional language. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic nihilists claimed such excess often led to malpractice and increase in iatrogenic (doctor-caused) injuries, accusing the physicians of creating even more illnesses. (wikipedia.org)
  • stem
  • However, Therapeutic Touch does not stem from one religious faith in particular, and it is not necessary to be religious to either give or receive the therapy. (unh.edu)
  • ethical
  • Therapeutic misconception is a common ethical problem encountered in human subjects research. (wikipedia.org)
  • disagreement persists, however, about what does or does not constitute an ethical justification for a non-elective therapeutic abortion, particularly regarding genetic disorders or mental impairment. (wikipedia.org)
  • findings
  • In practice, a procedure which starts as a diagnostic endoscopy may become a therapeutic endoscopy depending on the findings, such as in cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, or the finding of polyps during colonoscopy. (wikipedia.org)
  • procedure
  • Therapeutic assessment is a psychological assessment procedure which aims to help people gain insight and apply this new insight to problems in their life. (wikipedia.org)
  • effects
  • These three benefits are achieved by two main effects of therapeutic ultrasound. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the 1940s, ultrasound has been used by physical and occupational therapists for therapeutic effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many people think of therapeutic and undesired side effects as only applying to medications, drugs or supplements, perhaps because pharmacology approaches are more often more rigorously evaluated by carefully controlled comparisons with placebo treatments, but this is not the case. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic effects of providing MMPI-2 test feedback to college students awaiting therapy" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • process
  • It is strongly recommended horticultural therapists presence in the design process, since they are professionals specialized in the use of the gardens as a therapeutic tool, who know all the potentialities of a garden for this purpose, since it is their working tool with people with disabilities or illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stephen E. Finn has also authored a manual on Therapeutic Assessment using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) which breaks the process into three steps. (wikipedia.org)
  • Along with Professor Bruce Winick of the University of Miami School of Law, who developed the area with Wexler, these law professors suggested the need for a new perspective, TJ, to study the extent to which substantive rules, legal procedures, and the role of legal actors (lawyers and judges primarily) produce therapeutic or antitherapeutic consequences for individuals involved in the legal process. (wikipedia.org)
  • term
  • The term therapeutic governance has been used multiply in the social science literature, referring to two interrelated concepts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hence the controversy of using the term "therapeutic abortion" as a justification for aborting a baby with abnormalities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term was coined by Thomas Main in his 1946 paper, "The hospital as a therapeutic institution", and subsequently developed by others including Maxwell Jones, R. D. Laing at the Philadelphia Association, David Cooper at Villa 21, and Joshua Bierer. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term 'Therapeutic Assessment' was coined in 1993 by Stephen E. Finn to describe the semi-structured collaborative assessment paradigm developed by himself and colleagues at the Center for Therapeutic Assessment in Austin, Texas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finn suggests differentiating the capitalized "Therapeutic Assessment" or the abbreviation, "TA" as the paradigm developed by himself and his colleagues and the lowercase "therapeutic assessment" as the more general term which describes a variety of humanistically based assessment models. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the early 90's, legal scholars began to use the term when discussing mental health law, including Wexler in his 1990 book Therapeutic Jurisprudence: The Law as a Therapeutic Agent, and Wexler and Winick in their 1991 book, Essays in Therapeutic Jurisprudence. (wikipedia.org)
  • agent
  • However, when used for insomnia, as in many over-the-counter preparations, the therapeutic effect of diphenhydramine is drowsiness and the side effect is mucous membrane dryness, which is undesirable, especially if the person using the agent for sleep is already suffering from dry membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The therapeutic index (TI) (also referred to as therapeutic ratio) is a comparison of the amount of a therapeutic agent that causes the therapeutic effect to the amount that causes toxicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Less
  • For instance, among the opioid painkillers, remifentanil is the most forgiving, offering a therapeutic index of 33,000:1, while morphine is less so with a therapeutic index of 70:1. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diazepam, a benzodiazepine sedative-hypnotic and skeletal muscle relaxant has a less forgiving therapeutic index of 100:1. (wikipedia.org)
  • Less safe are cocaine, a stimulant and local anaesthetic, and ethanol (colloquially, the "alcohol" in alcoholic beverages), a widely available sedative consumed worldwide - the therapeutic indices for these substances are 15:1 and 10:1, respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient
  • The therapeutic privilege is an exception to the general rule of informed consent, and only applies when disclosure of the information itself could pose serious and immediate harm to the patient, such as prompting suicidal behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic optimism occurs when a patient hopes for the best personal possible outcome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic gardens can be found in a variety of settings, including hospitals, skilled nursing homes, assisted living residences, continuing care retirement communities, out-patient cancer centers, hospice residences, and other related healthcare and residential environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic communities have gained some reputation for success in rehabilitation and patient satisfaction in Britain and abroad. (wikipedia.org)
  • A higher therapeutic index is preferable to a lower one: a patient would have to take a much higher dose of such a drug to reach the toxic threshold than the dose taken to elicit the therapeutic effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Therapeutic abortion is abortion induced following a diagnosis of medical necessity. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some developed societies, merely a pregnant woman's stated desire to terminate her pregnancy is the only criterion necessary for an abortion to be deemed "therapeutic", though this should not be confused with a therapeutic abortion performed because of a medical emergency. (wikipedia.org)
  • Around the late 19th century, therapeutic nihilism gained some prominence among medical professionals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cultural critic Matthew Arnold wrote that "the stream of tendency of modern medical thought was toward a therapeutic nihilism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic nihilism slowly faded in the 19th century as systematic reform of the medical education system took place, then reappeared in the 20th century in a slightly different fashion than prior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peter Morrell (1 March 2003), "Therapeutic nihilism", British Medical Journal, 326: 518, doi:10.1136/bmj.326.7388.518/c CLARKE, MAURICE D. (30 August 1888). (wikipedia.org)
  • disabilities
  • CUSTOMIZED ADAPTATION --------- PURPOSE: To create a custom adapted version of "Guitar Hero" for individuals with upper limb disabilities or amputation to provide fun, entertaining and therapeutic exercise. (abledata.com)
  • effect
  • As a simple example, the therapeutic effect of [diphenhydramine], when used for nasal congestion, is to lessen mucous membrane secretions and the side effect is drowsiness. (wikipedia.org)
  • a change in the situation can easily totally reverse what is usually considered a therapeutic versus an undesirable side effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Therapeutic misestimation may occur when subjects overestimate the benefits that a study can grant them or when they underestimate the potential risks associated with a particular study. (wikipedia.org)
  • OQUIN: The OQUIN:Hypertension Initiative at MUSC performed the initial study and reporting on therapeutic inertia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emily Rosa, at 9 years of age, conceived and executed a study on therapeutic touch. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Therapeutic Touch is mostly used by nurses and can be found in hospitals, healthcare centers and clinics. (unh.edu)
  • patients
  • Comprehensive and cutting-edge, Therapeutic Lipidology will empower readers to improve and extend the lives of the patients they so conscientiously serve. (springer.com)
  • find
  • At CafePress, our extensive collection of Therapeutic Massage decals means you'll be sure to find the perfect sticker for you. (cafepress.com)
  • paper
  • The American Horticultural Therapy Association (AHTA) Definitions and Positions Paper draws a distinction between a therapeutic garden and a healing garden. (wikipedia.org)
  • malnourished children
  • The primary examples of therapeutic foods are used for emergency feeding of malnourished children or to supplement the diets of persons with special nutrition requirements, such as the elderly. (wikipedia.org)
  • field
  • This reference will serve as a lifelong stimulus to the reader to continue to learn about the ever changing and fascinating field of therapeutic lipidology. (springer.com)
  • Now, the field is fully international and robust, as evidenced by the recent launch of the International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence, a society with a comprehensive and authoritative website. (wikipedia.org)
  • Results
  • Results of research on therapeutic assessment show that subjects who received therapeutic assessment as opposed to controls (only examiner attention or test without feedback) reported a significant decline in symptomatic distress as well as significant increases in self-esteem and hopefulness, both immediately following the feedback session and at a 2-week follow-up. (wikipedia.org)
  • community
  • The work conducted at Northfield Military Hospital during World War II is considered by many psychiatrists to have been the first example of an intentional therapeutic community. (wikipedia.org)
  • concept
  • Therapeutic misconception did not receive great attention until the early 2000s, when references to the concept expanded significantly. (wikipedia.org)