Loading...
  • characteristic
  • Color temperature is a characteristic of visible light that has important applications in lighting , photography , videography , publishing , manufacturing , astrophysics , horticulture , and other fields. (wikipedia.org)
  • Junction temperature may be measured indirectly using the device's inherent voltage/temperature dependency characteristic. (wikipedia.org)
  • thermometer
  • devices for measuring temperature is the glass thermometer . (wikipedia.org)
  • Such thermometers are usually calibrated so that one can read the temperature simply by observing the level of the fluid in the thermometer. (wikipedia.org)
  • One must be careful when measuring temperature to ensure that the measuring instrument (thermometer, thermocouple, etc.) is really the same temperature as the material that is being measured. (wikipedia.org)
  • What thermal comfort humans, animals and plants experience is related to more than temperature shown on a glass thermometer. (wikipedia.org)
  • The wind chill factor makes the weather feel colder under windy conditions than calm conditions even though a glass thermometer shows the same temperature. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the length of a column of mercury, confined in a glass-walled capillary tube, is dependent largely on temperature, and is the basis of the very useful mercury-in-glass thermometer. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the most common devices for measuring temperature is the glass thermometer. (wikipedia.org)
  • relatively
  • Bringing a metal to its forging temperature allows the metal's shape to be changed by applying a relatively small force, without creating cracks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Materials which have useful engineering applications usually show a relatively rapid increase with temperature, i.e. a higher coefficient. (wikipedia.org)
  • kelvins
  • The color temperature of the electromagnetic radiation emitted from an ideal black body is defined as its surface temperature in kelvins , or alternatively in mireds (micro-reciprocal kelvins). (wikipedia.org)
  • approximation
  • Because such an approximation is not required for incandescent light, the CCT for an incandescent light is simply its unadjusted temperature, derived from comparison to a black-body radiator. (wikipedia.org)
  • The temperature dependence of conductors is to a great degree linear and can be described by the approximation below. (wikipedia.org)
  • thermometers
  • Thermometers measure temperature by a number of means, including the expansion that takes place in a medium such as mercury or alcohol. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The temperature of the air near the surface of the Earth is measured at meteorological observatories and weather stations, usually using thermometers placed in a Stevenson screen, a standardized well-ventilated white-painted instrument shelter. (wikipedia.org)
  • atoms
  • Because it avoids the abrupt jump from +∞ to −∞, β is considered more natural than T. In many familiar physical systems, temperature is associated to the kinetic energy of atoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Above the Curie temperature the atoms are excited, the spin orientation becomes randomised, but can be realigned in an applied field, i.e. the material becomes paramagnetic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Below the Curie temperature the intrinsic structure has undergone a phase transition, the atoms are ordered and the material is ferromagnetic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Graph
  • a) Our traditional graph of the annual and 5-year running means of the global temperature, and (b) 12-month and 132-month (to minimize the effect of the 11-year solar cycle) running means on the right. (columbia.edu)
  • commonly
  • The measure is most commonly applied to the perceived outdoor temperature. (wikipedia.org)
  • The measures are most commonly applied to perceived outdoor temperatures, but also apply to indoors, especially to saunas or when homes or workplaces are not sufficiently heated or cooled or insulated to provide comfortable or healthy conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • fluid
  • Temperature increase causes the fluid to expand, so the temperature can be determined by measuring the volume of the fluid. (wikipedia.org)
  • In thermodynamics and fluid mechanics , stagnation temperature is the temperature at a stagnation point in a fluid flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • In incompressible fluid flow , and in compressible flow , the stagnation temperature is equal to the total temperature at all points on the streamline leading to the stagnation point. (wikipedia.org)
  • Somewhat confusing terminology may be encountered in relation to boilers and heat exchangers, where the same term is used to refer to the limit (hot) temperature of a fluid in contact with a hot surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • measure
  • The modern scientific field has its origins in the works by Florentine scientists in the 1600s including Galileo constructing devices able to measure relative change in temperature, but subject also to confounding with atmospheric pressure changes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Under some conditions it becomes possible to measure temperature by a direct use of the Planck's law of black-body radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • transition
  • By adjusting the tension to be small compared to the Planck scale, the Hagedorn transition can be much less than the Planck temperature. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, since Krafft point is related to solid-liquid transition, better-packed polar heads within surfactant crystals increase Krafft temperature. (wikipedia.org)
  • In analogy to ferromagnetic and paramagnetic materials, the Curie temperature can also be used to describe the phase transition between ferroelectricity and paraelectricity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Resistance
  • Originally developed and used by the aerospace industry, HTA alloys are made from a high nickel-content metal with extreme temperature and fatigue cracking resistance. (sae.org)
  • Maximum junction temperature (sometimes abbreviated TJMax) is specified in a part's datasheet and is used when calculating the necessary case-to-ambient thermal resistance for a given power dissipation. (wikipedia.org)
  • A positive temperature coefficient (PTC) refers to materials that experience an increase in electrical resistance when their temperature is raised. (wikipedia.org)
  • neutral
  • For instance in 170 AD, physician Claudius Galenus mixed equal portions of ice and boiling water to create a "neutral" temperature standard. (wikipedia.org)
  • surface
  • Below are maps of the mean surface temperature anomaly for the past month, the past three months, and the past 12 months. (columbia.edu)
  • As detailed below, the real temperature of a surface can in some cases be calculated by dividing the brightness temperature by the emissivity of the surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ocean surface temperatures worldwide shot up by 5-8°C for a few thousand years - but in the Arctic, it heated up even more, to a balmy 23°C (73°F). This caused a severe dieoff of little ocean critters called foraminifera , and a drastic change of the dominant mammal species. (ucr.edu)
  • define
  • However, invoking the common assumption of a calorically perfect gas, enthalpy can be converted directly into temperature as given above, which enables one to define a stagnation temperature in terms of the more fundamental property, stagnation enthalpy. (wikipedia.org)