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  • medical
  • LinkedIn is the place for people interested in telemedicine to visit and discuss the options that the product can bring to the medical market. (prweb.com)
  • The rise of medical abortions done via telemedicine means more women may be able to end a pregnancy earlier and without requiring a doctor to be in the room. (healthline.com)
  • But, a new study finds there is no discernable risk for people who are given medical abortions via a telemedicine session compared to those who see the doctor in person. (healthline.com)
  • In a recent study published in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, researchers from the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) wanted to definitively study if there was additional risk to women who pursued a medical abortion via telemedicine compared to women who saw a doctor in person. (healthline.com)
  • In the seven-year study period from 2008 to 2015, there were 10,405 in-person medical abortions and 8,765 telemedicine abortions. (healthline.com)
  • Model for Medical Student Introductory Telemedicine Education. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Several medical specialty organizations and the American Telemedicine Association have developed specialty-specific guidelines and tips for optimal telemedicine use. (bioportfolio.com)
  • They are going to have to get the medical records first, have their doctors review it and see if the inmate can be seen by telemedicine or if we have to bring them on site," Mestas said. (governing.com)
  • A total of 455 telemedicine programs were identified, representing 30 medical specialties and serving many diverse populations. (nih.gov)
  • patient
  • The SAGES Telementoring Task Force, chaired by Dr. Christopher Schlachta, and co-chaired by Drs. Ninh Nguyen and Todd Ponsky, differentiates telementoring and telemedicine as follows: Telemedicine is providing a service directly to a patient over distance. (sages.org)
  • This makes telementoring different from teleconsultation where there is not an established relationship prior to the event, or telemedicine which is the direct interaction between the patient and the expert. (sages.org)
  • Must telemedicine disrupt the patient-doctor relationship? (acpinternist.org)
  • Ironically, Andrew Watson's first telemedicine procedure was with a rural patient who was a Mennonite. (healthcareitnews.com)
  • barriers
  • Not only does telemedicine face great societal barriers - some people aren't excited about the idea of virtually interacting with their doctors - but its potential is ultimately limited by the advancement of technology. (thenextweb.com)
  • quality
  • Journals publishing telemedicine-evaluation studies must set high standards for methodologic quality so that evidence reports need not rely on studies with marginal methodologies. (nih.gov)
  • study
  • Turns out Telemedicine has a similar problem - that was also reported last month - with equally provocative results from a vastly different study. (forbes.com)
  • At least 19 states have barred the procedure despite a recent 7-year study in which researchers concluded telemedicine abortion is safe. (healthline.com)
  • The evidence for self-monitoring/testing telemedicine is equivocal for all specialties, with positive results tempered by compromised study designs. (nih.gov)
  • practices
  • Members of the LinkedIn telemedicine discussion group can share best practices, suggestions for enhancing the product, questions and read about the latest news from the team behind MD247. (prweb.com)
  • research
  • Billions of dollars are being poured into the research and development side of telemedicine and there's unlimited potential within the next decade. (thenextweb.com)
  • place
  • The first large-scale use of telemedicine took place during the 1988 earthquake disaster in Armenia. (esa.int)
  • The Colorado Department of Corrections is busy this month installing connections in various areas where the telemedicine appointments will take place. (governing.com)