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  • kids
  • After hearing the heart murmur that suggests a hole in the atrial septum, a doctor may refer a teen to a pediatric cardiologist , a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating heart disease in kids and teens. (kidshealth.org)
  • calm
  • By coping with your own feelings, learning about cutting, finding professional help, and just being there to love and believe in your teen, you'll provide the calm, steady support that he or she needs. (kidshealth.org)
  • Learn
  • Therapy can allow teens to tell their stories, put their difficult experiences into words, and learn skills to deal with stresses that are part of life. (kidshealth.org)
  • Find
  • Find out all you can about cutting, why teens do it, and what can help them stop. (kidshealth.org)
  • All the technology in the world can't stop the creativity and ingenuity of teens who want to find a way to do something "forbidden. (psychcentral.com)
  • Practicing on slick pavement gives teens a chance to find the right speed for the conditions and helps demonstrate how traction is reduced. (kidshealth.org)
  • parent-teen
  • While parent-teen conversations must encompass the hormones, hydraulics and other biological aspects of love and attraction, equal time should be devoted to thoughtful discussions about love as the most powerful and heartfelt of all human emotions. (healthychildren.org)
  • To make sure your teen follows these guidelines and more, consider signing a parent-teen driving agreement. (uhc.com)
  • alcohol
  • If you make them common topics in your house, your teen is more likely to talk to you about the pressures they face with sex, drugs and alcohol. (uhc.com)
  • talk
  • It will probably be hard for your teen to talk about it, too. (kidshealth.org)
  • Your teen might not be ready to talk about it or even know why he or she cuts. (kidshealth.org)
  • Don't be surprised if your teen resists your efforts to talk about cutting. (kidshealth.org)
  • Talk with them about different treatment options for your teen. (uhc.com)
  • Make sure you talk to your teen about the importance of safe driving. (uhc.com)
  • Use it as a starting point to talk with your teen. (uhc.com)
  • affect
  • From asthma to ulcers, this section is loaded with articles about diseases and conditions that can affect teens. (kidshealth.org)
  • conditions
  • Many teens with Tourette syndrome also have other conditions like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) , learning disabilities, and anxiety . (kidshealth.org)
  • often
  • A heart murmur, along with other specific heart sounds, is often the first tip-off to a doctor that a teen has an ASD. (kidshealth.org)
  • better
  • Better yet, just tell your teens (and their friends) to turn off their cell phones in the car. (uhc.com)
  • Don't assume your teen doesn't know better and restrict them from experiences their peers are enjoying "just in case. (psychcentral.com)
  • hard
  • This can make it hard for teens with Tourette syndrome to have a conversation or pay attention in class. (kidshealth.org)
  • feel
  • You might feel hurt that your teen didn't come to you for help or feel guilty that you didn't know about it. (kidshealth.org)
  • Other teens feel pressure to be perfect and struggle to accept failures or mistakes. (kidshealth.org)
  • keep
  • As difficult as it is, try to keep in mind that exploring what pressures prompt your teen to self-injure is a necessary step toward healing. (kidshealth.org)
  • make
  • If your teen (or a friend) behaves inappropriately, make it clear that it's the activity - and not him or her personally - that you disapprove of. (uhc.com)
  • If possible, make your lessons coincide with what your teen is learning in driver's education at school. (kidshealth.org)
  • stop
  • For instance, when approaching a stop sign, teens should watch for other cars coming from different directions that may not stop. (kidshealth.org)
  • resources
  • You also can look into resources like the "Teaching Your Teens to Drive" handbook and DVD from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. (kidshealth.org)
  • friend
  • Many teens worry about a friend who cuts or face pressure from peers to try cutting as a daring thing to do. (kidshealth.org)
  • cause
  • For example, some types of anti-seizure medicines and acne medicines can cause this kind of lupus in teens. (kidshealth.org)
  • Traffic crashes are the leading cause of teen deaths in America. (uhc.com)
  • Traffic
  • In traffic, encourage your teen to watch for cars that suddenly switch lanes without signaling or that pull out in front. (kidshealth.org)
  • sure
  • Learning that your own teen is doing it can leave you feeling shocked and upset - and not sure what to do or how to help. (kidshealth.org)
  • Teens need to be sure their diets include enough nutrients to fuel growth, particularly protein and calcium. (kidshealth.org)
  • Close
  • Begin with family members or close friends who your teen is comfortable driving with and you're comfortable coaching around. (kidshealth.org)