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  • solid
  • Frequently, a trephine biopsy is also obtained, which yields a narrow, cylindrically shaped solid piece of bone marrow, 2mm wide and 2 cm long (80 μL), which is examined microscopically (sometimes with the aid of immunohistochemistry) for cellularity and infiltrative processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The needle is then advanced with a twisting motion and rotated to obtain a solid piece of bone marrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • human bone marrow
  • The chapter examines pathologic findings seen in the human bone marrow. (springer.com)
  • In-vitro colony forming cell (CFC) assays using normal human bone marrow grown in appropriate semi-solid media such as ColonyGEL have been shown to be useful in predicting the level of clinical myelotoxicity a certain compound might cause if administered to humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • progenitor
  • These predictive in-vitro assays reveal effects the administered compounds have on the bone marrow progenitor cells that produce the various mature cells in the blood and can be used to test the effects of single drugs or the effects of drugs administered in combination with others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diamond-Blackfan anemia is characterized by normocytic or macrocytic anemia (low red blood cell counts) with decreased erythroid progenitor cells in the bone marrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • leukemia
  • The tissues of the recipient, a patient with leukemia, accepted the donated marrow (or graft) from his identical twin and used it to make new, healthy blood cells and immune system cells. (britannica.com)
  • If an individual's marrow is diseased-from leukemia, for example-a person with a matching tissue type is found to donate stem cells. (britannica.com)
  • primarily
  • Yellow bone marrow serves primarily as a storehouse for fats but may be converted to red marrow under certain conditions, such as severe blood loss or fever. (britannica.com)
  • This is in contrast to Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome, in which the bone marrow defect results primarily in neutropenia, and Fanconi anemia, where all cell lines are affected resulting in pancytopenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • donation
  • If you're not sure about joining the register, then just spend some time finding out more about bone marrow and the donation process. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • That same year, Katharina's father Peter founded DKMS (which is the German acronym for "bone marrow donation center) in honor of his wife. (forbes.com)
  • thrombocytes
  • Bone marrow suppression also known as myelotoxicity or myelosuppression, is the decrease in production of cells responsible for providing immunity (leukocytes), carrying oxygen (erythrocytes), and/or those responsible for normal blood clotting (thrombocytes). (wikipedia.org)
  • tibia
  • In some restaurants, cooked pig tibia would be served with a drinking straw specifically for sucking out the semi-liquified marrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorders
  • Bone marrow failure syndromes are relatively rare and universally complex disorders. (childrens.com)
  • The Bone Marrow Failure Program at the Gill Center has the breadth and depth of expertise needed to provide complete care to children and their families affected by these hematologic disorders. (childrens.com)
  • chemotherapy
  • Bone marrow is suppressed with the use of cancer chemotherapy. (news-medical.net)
  • Bone marrow suppression due to anti-cancer chemotherapy is much harder to treat and often involves hospital admission, strict infection control, and aggressive use of intravenous antibiotics at the first sign of infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • aplastic
  • A leading contributor to bone marrow failure disorder registries, including the International Fanconi Anemia Registry, Diamond-Blackfan Registry, Shwachman- Diamond Registry and North American Pediatric Aplastic Anemia Consortium (NAPAAC). (childrens.com)
  • Aplastic anemia happens when bone marrow doesn't produce enough new blood cells throughout the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • donors
  • At the time, there were only 3,000 bone marrow donors registered in Germany. (forbes.com)
  • Bone marrow donors have to be in good physical health and be between 18 and 55 years old. (forbes.com)
  • To facilitate the exchange of information and improve business relations, the WMDA provides access to contact data of organisations that are listing donors or cord blood products in the global database of Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • In immunocompromised patients, B19 infection may persist for months, leading to chronic anemia with B19 viremia due to chronic marrow suppression. (wikipedia.org)
  • syndromes
  • We rely on a comprehensive panel of subspecialists with an express interest in bone marrow failure syndromes. (childrens.com)
  • We counsel families on the underlying genetic causes of bone marrow failure syndromes, and offer them carrier testing when appropriate. (childrens.com)
  • Search
  • But when Shin-bi is diagnosed with leukemia and Seung-wan and Se-jin desperately search for a viable bone marrow donor, they realize how much they love each other and the family they've created. (wikipedia.org)
  • body
  • The researchers, from the Liggins Institute at the University of Auckland, found that bone retains a 'memory' of exercise's effects long after the exercise is ceased, and this bone memory continues to change the way the body metabolises a high-fat diet, and published these results in Frontiers in Physiology. (membs.org)
  • Load-bearing from exercise and higher bodyweight is good for growing bones, but this and other evidence shows that if the extra weight comes from higher body fat mass, bone development may be subnormal,' he says. (membs.org)
  • Bone metabolism strongly influences energy metabolism in the body, and metabolism -- what you do with energy from diet -- is the central crux of why some children and adults become obese. (membs.org)
  • found
  • Researchers from the Liggins Institute at the University of Auckland have found that bone retains a 'memory' of exercise's effects long after the exercise is ceased, and this bone memory continues to change the way bodies metabolise a high-fat diet. (membs.org)