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  • asthma
  • Typically, patients who have aspirin-sensitive asthma cannot take aspirin or aspirin-containing products since aspirin can cause severe asthma attacks, runny nose, facial/chest/back flushing, as well as swelling in the throat or skin. (american-rhinologic.org)
  • Patients who have severe asthma are more likely to be aspirin sensitive than patients with mild asthma. (american-rhinologic.org)
  • Similarly, patients with polyps and asthma are more likely to be aspirin sensitive than are patients with just nasal polyps. (american-rhinologic.org)
  • The disorder typically progresses to asthma, then nasal polyposis, with aspirin sensitivity coming last. (wikipedia.org)
  • The respiratory reactions to aspirin vary in severity, ranging from mild nasal congestion and eye watering to lower respiratory symptoms including wheezing, coughing, an asthma attack, and in rare cases, anaphylaxis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The underlying cause of the disorder is not fully understood, but there have been several important findings: Abnormally low levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which is protective for the lungs, has been found in patients with aspirin-induced asthma and may worsen their lung inflammation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Overexpression of both the cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 and the leukotriene C4 synthase enzyme has been shown in respiratory tissue from patients with aspirin-induced asthma, which likely relates to the increased response to leukotrienes and increased production of leukotrienes seen in the disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • The attachment of platelets to certain leukocytes in the blood of patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma has also been shown to contribute to the overproduction of leukotrienes. (wikipedia.org)
  • There may be a relationship between aspirin-induced asthma and TBX21, PTGER2, and LTC4S. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here are links to possibly useful sources of information about Aspirin-induced asthma . (wikipedia.org)
  • headache
  • Aspirin, either by itself or in a combined formulation, effectively treats certain types of a headache, but its efficacy may be questionable for others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aspirin or other over-the-counter analgesics are widely recognized as effective for the treatment of tension headache. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aspirin/meprobamate (trade name Equagesic /ˌɛkwəˈdʒiːzɪk/) is a combination drug indicated for short-term pain treatment accompanied by tension or anxiety in patients with musculoskeletal disorders or tension headache. (wikipedia.org)
  • cyclooxygenase
  • Aspirin causes the cyclooxygenase to make a small amount of a related product called 15-HETE," said senior author Edward A. Dennis, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology, Chemistry and Biochemistry. (ucsd.edu)
  • symptoms
  • In addition to the typical respiratory reactions, about 10% of patients with AERD manifest skin symptoms like urticaria and/or gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain or vomiting during their reactions to aspirin. (wikipedia.org)
  • A consumer health resource center providing an overview of the causes, symptoms, and treatment of aspirin poisoning. (dmoztools.net)
  • Bayer
  • By 1899, Bayer had named it "Aspirin" and sold it around the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 1920 agreement between Sterling and Bayer AG granted Sterling the rights to the "Bayer" brand to sell aspirin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bayer also re-acquired the brand rights to the "Bayer Aspirin" name it had lost because of World War I. Spinoffs from the sale of Sterling include Starwin Products, created in 1987 from Sterling's original branch in Ghana. (wikipedia.org)
  • pregnancy
  • Aspirin is not recommended in the last part of pregnancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The safety of the combination during pregnancy has not been established, although aspirin is generally contraindicated during pregnancy, and the drug has been placed in pregnancy category D. Inactive ingredients include D&C Yellow 10, FD&C Yellow 6, microcrystalline cellulose, and corn starch. (wikipedia.org)
  • medications
  • Aspirin is one of the most widely used medications globally, with an estimated 40,000 tonnes (44,000 tons) (50 to 120 billion pills) consumed each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systematic
  • This systematic review searched multiple medical databases to find all randomised controlled trials to date on aspirin for treating migraine episodes. (www.nhs.uk)
  • take
  • Millions of people take aspirin to fight headaches, fend off strokes and heart attacks, and ease the pain of arthritis. (newscientist.com)
  • I'm supposed to take aspirin daily. (medhelp.org)
  • It said that researchers have suggested that one in four migraine sufferers could be pain-free within two hours if they take up to 1,000mg of aspirin in one go. (www.nhs.uk)
  • chemical
  • They found that aspirin inhibited the release of an unidentified chemical generated by guinea pig lungs, a chemical that caused rabbit tissue to contract. (wikipedia.org)
  • stroke
  • Aspirin has long been recommended for patients already known to suffer from heart conditions and those at high risk of stroke, with evidence indicating its blood-thinning qualities render the risk of side-effects worthwhile . (telegraph.co.uk)
  • blood
  • Aspirin is also used long-term to help prevent heart attacks, ischaemic strokes, and blood clots in people at high risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aspirin vs Blood thinner? (drugs.com)
  • I was hospitalized and I was taking aspirin prior the nurse was taking blood from me and noticed my blood was thin and she asked if I was taking aspirin. (drugs.com)
  • My question is does taking aspirin work just as well as a blood thinner? (drugs.com)
  • Is there any blood thinner or aspirin in trazodone? (drugs.com)
  • Treatment
  • This is a high dose and aspirin is not without adverse effects, nor is it a suitable treatment for everyone. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Studies also had to compare aspirin to either placebo or to an active drug treatment. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The researchers also looked at the rate of adverse effects experienced with aspirin, placebo or the other active treatment tested. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Five studies compared aspirin with placebo, four compared aspirin with active treatment and four compared aspirin with both placebo and active treatment. (www.nhs.uk)
  • fever
  • Information about the Australian government's re-examination of the evidence linking aspirin use in children or teenagers with chicken pox, influenza or fever, with Reye's Syndrome. (dmoztools.net)
  • pain
  • Topical aspirin may be effective for treating some types of neuropathic pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heinrich Dreser's explanation, widely accepted since the drug was first brought to market, was that aspirin relieved pain by acting on the central nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • It found that 24% of people given aspirin were pain-free at two hours compared to 11% of those given placebo. (www.nhs.uk)
  • drug
  • This well-conducted Cochrane review combined the results of 13 trials, which compared aspirin to placebo or another migraine drug. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Her research was highlighted in "Aspirin: The Remarkable Story of a Wonder Drug" by Diarmuid Jeffreys. (wikipedia.org)
  • however
  • however, the allergy to aspirin is not the same as allergies to dust mites, cats, dogs, or pollen. (american-rhinologic.org)
  • The word Aspirin was Bayer's brand name, however their rights to the trademark were lost or sold in many countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, other effects of aspirin, such as uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, and the modulation of signaling through NF-κB, are also being investigated. (wikipedia.org)
  • given
  • Aspirin given shortly after a heart attack decreases the risk of death. (wikipedia.org)
  • In tests on guinea pigs, Collier found that aspirin, if given beforehand, inhibited the bronchoconstriction effects of bradykinin. (wikipedia.org)
  • In five studies, 1,000mg of aspirin was given as either a single tablet or in soluble form (dissolved in water). (www.nhs.uk)
  • risk
  • In the United States low dose aspirin is deemed reasonable in those between 50 and 70 years old who have a more than 10% risk of cardiovascular disease and are not at an increased risk of bleeding who are otherwise healthy. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Robert Lynn Asprin (June 28, 1946 - May 22, 2008) was an American science fiction and fantasy author and active fan, best known for his humorous MythAdventures and Phule's Company series. (wikipedia.org)
  • active
  • Aspirin, although usually made synthetically now, was originally derived from salicin, the active ingredient in willow bark. (infoplease.com)
  • Asasantin retard capsules contain two active ingredients, aspirin and dipyridamole. (netdoctor.co.uk)