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  • incidence
  • Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. (ox.ac.uk)
  • FINDINGS: The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48-3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-1.7). (ox.ac.uk)
  • Adherence was lower in participants taking aspirin than in controls, and the incidence of adverse events was higher. (anglia.ac.uk)
  • Background Aspirin has been shown to lower the incidence and the mortality of vascular disease and cancer but its wider adoption appears to be seriously impeded by concerns about gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. (cf.ac.uk)
  • However, the annual incidence of major bleeding due to low-dose aspirin is modest-only 1.3 patients per thousand higher than what is observed with placebo treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • baseline
  • FINDINGS: Baseline characteristics, and prognosis in patients allocated placebo, differed strikingly between those who were and were not taking aspirin at baseline. (ox.ac.uk)
  • 0.0001), with clear reductions in risk both among those receiving aspirin at baseline (odds ratio 0.80, [99% CI 0.73-0. and those who were not (0.71 [99% CI 0.62-0. interaction p=0.07). (ox.ac.uk)
  • outcomes
  • Results from analyses of all trials, except SOLVD, did not suggest any significant differences between the proportional reductions in risk with ACE inhibitor therapy in the presence or absence of aspirin for the major clinical outcomes (p=0.15), or in any of its individual components, except myocardial infarction (interaction p=0.01). (ox.ac.uk)
  • INTERPRETATION: Considering the totality of evidence on all major vascular outcomes in these trials, there is only weak evidence of any reduction in the benefit of ACE-inhibitor therapy when added to aspirin. (ox.ac.uk)
  • However, there is definite evidence of clinically important benefits with respect to these major clinical outcomes with ACE-inhibitor therapy, irrespective of whether concomitant aspirin is used. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Aspirin resistance may be associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. (semanticscholar.org)
  • 0.80
  • In these the relative risk (RR) of 'major' incident GI bleeding in subjects who had been randomised to low-dose aspirin was 1.55 (95% CI 1.33, 1.83), and the risk of a bleed attributable to aspirin being fatal was 0.45 (95% CI 0.25, 0.80). (cf.ac.uk)
  • analyses
  • Further subgroup analyses showed that aspirin use could decrease risk of in situ breast tumors or hormone receptor-positive tumors and reduce risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. (aacrjournals.org)
  • mortality
  • Previously, we have investigated the effect of aspirin intake on the mortality in breast cancer, but only found that aspirin use has a small effect on the survival of breast cancer patients ( 6 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • risk
  • Previous studies concerning the association between aspirin use and breast cancer risk yielded inconsistent results. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Aspirin use may not affect overall risk of breast cancer, but decrease risk of in situ breast tumors or hormone receptor-positive tumors and reduce risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The investigators concluded that regular use of aspirin may be associated with reduced risk of breast cancer. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Is testing for aspirin response worthwhile in high-risk pregnancy? (semanticscholar.org)
  • The substantive risk for prophylactic aspirin is therefore cerebral haemorrhage which can be fatal or severely disabling, with an estimated risk of one death and one disabling stroke for every 1,000 people taking aspirin for ten years. (cf.ac.uk)
  • Aspirin given shortly after a heart attack decreases the risk of death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aspirin is also used long-term to help prevent heart attacks, ischaemic strokes, and blood clots in people at high risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medications
  • Aspirin is one of the most widely used medications globally, with an estimated 40,000 tonnes (44,000 tons) (50 to 120 billion pills) consumed each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • inhibitor
  • Often a combination of aspirin plus an ADP/P2Y inhibitor (such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor, or another) is used in order to obtain greater effectiveness than with either agent alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • dose
  • For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0-2.6) and 1.8 (1.1-3.0), respectively. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2-1.7) overall. (ox.ac.uk)
  • CONCLUSIONS: The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. (ox.ac.uk)
  • median follow-up 5 years), the use of low-dose aspirin was not associated with significantly better global cognition (SMD=0.005, 95% CI=-0.04-0.05, P = .84, I2 = 0%) in individuals without dementia. (anglia.ac.uk)
  • Conclusion This review found no evidence that low-dose aspirin buffers against cognitive decline or dementia or improves cognitive test scores in RCTs. (anglia.ac.uk)
  • adverse events
  • Conclusions The majority of the adverse events caused by aspirin are GI bleeds, and there appears to be no valid evidence that the overall frequency of fatal GI bleeds is increased by aspirin. (cf.ac.uk)
  • odds
  • This figure presents odds ratios of intracranial hemorrhage of individual NOACs vs aspirin, by trial and pooled, calculated via the Mantel-Haenszel method. (jamanetwork.com)
  • studies
  • When stratified by study design, a significant benefit for aspirin users was only found in population-based and hospital-based case-control studies but not in cohort or nest case-control studies. (aacrjournals.org)
  • effects
  • Although protection of aspirin against cancer has been showed, the protective effects are seen mainly in colorectal, esophageal, gastric, and endometrial cancers ( 3 , 5 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • These adverse effects of aspirin should be weighed against the reductions in vascular disease and cancer. (cf.ac.uk)
  • A precursor to aspirin in the form of leaves from the willow tree has been used for its health effects for at least 2,400 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • pain
  • Recently, the potential anticancer properties of aspirin, commonly known as pain reliever, have attracted more interest ( 2 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Topical aspirin may be effective for treating some types of neuropathic pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • efficacy
  • The new recommendations are based on a systematic evidence review and comparative efficacy analysis of oral medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (metformin, sulfonylureas, meglitinides, thiazolidinediones, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 [DPP-inhibitors, and glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-receptor antagonists). (cmhealthfoundation.org)
  • A 2016 systematic review compared the efficacy of valproate as an add-on for people with schizophrenia: Based upon five case reports, valproic acid may have efficacy in controlling the symptoms of the dopamine dysregulation syndrome that arise from the treatment of Parkinson's disease with levodopa. (wikipedia.org)
  • name
  • The new drug, formally acetylsalicylic acid, was named aspirin by Hoffmann's employer Bayer AG after the old botanical name for meadowsweet, Spiraea ulmaria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its trivial name is cervonic acid, its systematic name is all-cis-docosa-4,7,10,13,16,19-hexa-enoic acid, and its shorthand name is 22:6(n−3) in the nomenclature of fatty acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • It may also be given as trans-[Fe(H2O)4Cll⋅2H2O and the systematic name tetraaquadichloroiron(III) chloride dihydrate, which more clearly represents its structure. (wikipedia.org)