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  • 2018
  • A considerably revised set of rules for systematic internalisation will apply from 3 January 2018 onwards. (bafin.de)
  • Whereas at present investment services enterprises can only be considered systematic internalisers owing to an exceeding of thresholds from September 2018 at the earliest, a voluntary opt-in is possible as of 3 January 2018. (bafin.de)
  • Suppose
  • Example: Suppose a supermarket wants to study buying habits of their customers, then using systematic sampling they can choose every 10th or 15th customer entering the supermarket and conduct the study on this sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • To illustrate the danger of systematic skip concealing a pattern, suppose we were to sample a planned neighborhood where each street has ten houses on each block. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reviews
  • Browse the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews . (cochranelibrary.com)
  • These guidelines depend on recommendations made on the basis of systematic reviews of all the available medical evidence. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • There are step-by-step instructions for conducting systematic reviews. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The Cochrane Library is a collection of systematic reviews that is widely respected by the international medical community. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Systematic reviews are types of literature reviews that collect and critically analyze multiple research studies or papers, using methods that are selected before one or more research questions are formulated, and then finding and analyzing studies that relate to and answer those questions in a structured methodology. (wikipedia.org)
  • An understanding of systematic reviews, and how to implement them in practice, is highly recommended for professionals involved in the delivery of health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systematic reviews are not limited to medicine and are quite common in all other sciences where data are collected, published in the literature, and an assessment of methodological quality for a precisely defined subject would be helpful. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each included study may be assigned an objective assessment of methodological quality preferably by using methods conforming to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement (the current guideline) or the high quality standards of Cochrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systematic reviews often, but not always, use statistical techniques (meta-analysis) to combine results of eligible studies, or at least use scoring of the levels of evidence depending on the methodology used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Groups like the Campbell Collaboration are promoting the use of systematic reviews in policy-making beyond just healthcare. (wikipedia.org)
  • The PRISMA statement suggests a standardized way to ensure a transparent and complete reporting of systematic reviews, and is now required for this kind of research by more than 170 medical journals worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Developments in systematic reviews during the 21st century included realist[disambiguation needed] reviews and the meta-narrative approach, both of which addressed problems of methods and heterogeneity existing on some subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Articles are either about specific systematic reviews, reporting their protocols, methodologies, findings, followup, etc., or else they are about such reviews as a class, discussing the science of systematic reviews. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemistry
  • In order to discuss such elements without ambiguity, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) uses a set of rules to assign a temporary systematic name and symbol to each such element. (wikipedia.org)
  • algorithms
  • However, for certain decoding algorithms such as sequential decoding or maximum-likelihood decoding, a non-systematic structure can increase performance in terms of undetected decoding error probability when the minimum free distance of the code is larger. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • In finance and economics, systematic risk (in economics often called aggregate risk or undiversifiable risk) is vulnerability to events which affect aggregate outcomes such as broad market returns, total economy-wide resource holdings, or aggregate income. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systematic names often co-exist with earlier common names assigned before the creation of any systematic naming system. (wikipedia.org)
  • list
  • BaFin must then forward this information to the European Securities and Markets Authority ( ESMA ), which is preparing a list of all systematic internalisers active in the European Union. (bafin.de)
  • Research
  • More recently emerged areas of research which at least partially are in the scope of systematic musicology comprise cognitive musicology, neuromusicology, biomusicology, and music cognition including embodied music cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • however
  • However it is not the same as SRS because not every possible sample of a certain size has an equal chance of being chosen (e.g. samples with at least two elements adjacent to each other will never be chosen by systematic sampling). (wikipedia.org)
  • It is however, much more efficient (if variance within systematic sample is more than variance of population). (wikipedia.org)
  • subject
  • Pursuant to the new provision of section 79 sentence 1 of the WpHG , all investment services enterprises which act as systematic internalisers are subject to the notification requirement. (bafin.de)
  • either
  • In general the application of a systematic process is regarded as a means of management aimed at reducing the number and severity of mistakes, errors and failures due to either human or technological functions involved. (wikipedia.org)
  • Convolutional codes are implemented as either systematic or non-systematic codes. (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • Systematic internalisation is defined in section 2 (8) no. 2 (b) of the amended WpHG as frequently organised and systematic dealing on own account on a substantial basis outside an organised market or multilateral or organised trading facility when client orders are executed outside a regulated market or a multilateral or organised trading facility without operating a multilateral trading system. (bafin.de)
  • Systematic trading, in fact, lends itself to control risk precisely because it allows money managers to define profit targets, loss points, trade size, and system shutdown points objectively and in advance of entering each trade. (wikipedia.org)
  • name
  • A systematic symbol is also derived from this name. (wikipedia.org)
  • A semisystematic name or semitrivial name is a name that has at least one systematic part and at least one trivial part. (wikipedia.org)
  • Creating systematic names can be as simple as assigning a prefix or a number to each object (in which case they are a type of numbering scheme), or as complex as encoding the complete structure of the object in the name. (wikipedia.org)
  • approach
  • An example of systematic approach would be: Identify, using fundamental analysis, which stocks and futures should be used for replication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systematic trading should take into account the importance of risk management, using a systematic approach to quantify risk, consistent limits and techniques to define how to close excessively risky positions. (wikipedia.org)
  • process
  • The process of systematic desensitization occurs in three steps. (wikipedia.org)
  • Use of systematic process in strategic planning has been both challenged, due to rapid change in market conditions, and advocated as a source of improvement. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, "Many OECD countries have a transparent and systematic process of public consultation to enhance the quality of the regulatory process by guaranteeing that the impact on citizens and businesses is taken into account. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Systematic desensitization, also known as graduated exposure therapy, is a type of cognitive behavior therapy developed by South African psychiatrist, Joseph Wolpe. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systematic trading (also known as mechanical trading) is a way of defining trade goals, risk controls and rules that can make investment and trading decisions in a methodical way. (wikipedia.org)
  • science
  • A representation of phenomena, in order to answer the purposes of science, must be systematic . (everything2.com)
  • Systematic musicology has traditionally been conceived of as an interdisciplinary science, whose aim it is to explore the foundations of music from different points of view, such as acoustics, physiology, psychology, anthro- pology, music theory, sociology, and aesthetics. (wikipedia.org)
  • specific
  • Systematic musicology is different in that it tends not to put these specific manifestations in the foreground, although it of course refers to them. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • Systematic trading includes both high frequency trading (HFT, sometimes called algorithmic trading) and slower types of investment such as systematic trend following. (wikipedia.org)
  • Close
  • On the other hand, an investor who invests all of his money in one industry whose returns are typically uncorrelated with broad market outcomes (Beta close to zero) has limited his exposure to systematic risk but, due to lack of diversification, is highly vulnerable to idiosyncratic risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Although technical systematic systems are more common, there are also systems using fundamental data such as those in equity long:short hedge funds and GTAA funds. (wikipedia.org)
  • definition
  • More detailed provisions on the definition of frequent systematic trading or trading on a substantial basis can be found in section 2 (8) sentence 3 and sentence 4 of the WpHG . (bafin.de)
  • Making
  • DVD sisältää 5.1-monikanavamiksauksen albumista sekä Mike Portnoyn ohjaaman dokumentin Chaos in Progress - The Making of Systematic Chaos . (wikipedia.org)
  • Instead
  • Instead, some contemporary systematic theologians seek to use all available resources to ascertain the nature of God and God's relationship to the world, including philosophy, history, culture, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • but since all market actors are vulnerable to systematic risk, it cannot be limited through diversification (but it may be insurable). (wikipedia.org)
  • Systematic risk plays an important role in portfolio allocation. (wikipedia.org)
  • investors face a trade-off between returns and systematic risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Investors can only reduce a portfolio's exposure to systematic risk by sacrificing returns. (wikipedia.org)
  • An important concept for evaluating an asset's exposure to systematic risk is Beta. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since Beta indicates the degree to which an asset's expected return is correlated with broader market outcomes, it is simply an indicator of an asset's vulnerability to systematic risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • theory
  • In coding theory, a systematic code is any error-correcting code in which the input data is embedded in the encoded output. (wikipedia.org)