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  • Regulation
  • The existence of these vast quantities of non-coding RNAs in cells implies the significance of these differential RNA species in the regulation of biological processes ( 1 , 4 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Northern blot and real-time RT-PCR analyses indicated that the sfRNA becomes apparent at the time point at which minus-strand RNA (antigenome) reaches a plateau suggesting a role for sfRNA in the regulation of antigenome synthesis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We made a series of discoveries that introduced the important and pervasive roles of long noncoding RNAs in biological regulation. (stanford.edu)
  • In addition to classical gene regulatory networks noted above, we have recently identified a central role for additional biologic mechanisms, namely gene regulation by chromatin regulators and by noncoding RNAs. (stanford.edu)
  • tRNA
  • The interaction of edeine with the small subunit indicates its role in inhibiting initiation and shows its involvement with P‐site tRNA. (embopress.org)
  • precursor
  • Also, the small fraction of pulse-labeled nuclear RNA converted to more stable mRNAs, only 5-10%, added to the difficulty of proving a precursor product relationship from pulse-chase labeling experiments. (pnas.org)
  • Moreover, this full-length pre-rRNA precursor accumulates to significant levels before it is processed into stable mature rRNAs of 18S (1,870 bases), 5.8S (156 bases), and 28S (5,034 bases), so that the fraction of pre-RNA processed into stable cytoplasmic rRNAs is ∼50%, much more than the 5-10% of pulse-labeled hnRNA processed into mRNAs. (pnas.org)
  • This fortuitous situation for the study of prerRNA by pulse-chase labeling made it possible to show that the rRNAs were processed by the cleavage of the pre-RNA precursor into the stable rRNAs that were transported to the cytoplasm in nearly fully mature ribosomal subunits. (pnas.org)
  • Formation of diverse mRNAs through differential splicing of the same RNA precursor. (tripod.com)
  • genome
  • The JEV genome is a single-stranded positive sense RNA of about 10,976-nts that encodes a single large open reading frame (ORF) flanked by a 95-nucleotide (nt) long 5' untranslated region (UTR) and a 585-nt long 3' UTR with no poly A tail. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It has a very small genome (130-140 Mbp), five chromosomes and contains almost no repetitive DNA. (tripod.com)
  • 7SK occupies enhancers and super enhancers genome wide in mouse and human cells, and it is required to limit enhancer-RNA initiation and synthesis in a manner distinct from promoter pausing. (nih.gov)
  • My group has substantial experience in epigenetics and RNA biology, including invention of new methods for epigenomic profiling, map RNA occupancy on chromatin, and define RNA structures genome-wide. (stanford.edu)
  • Ribosome
  • An early step in ribosome biogenesis is initiated by the extremely high transcriptional activity of Pol I and occurs in the largest nuclear domain, the nucleolus (Figure 1(b) ). (hindawi.com)
  • Pol III synthesizes transfer RNAs (tRNAs), the RNA for the small subunit of the ribosome, and other snRNAs. (barnardhealth.us)
  • RNAi
  • Here we demonstrate that the enhancer from the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter can enhance the U6 promoter activity, the synthesis of shRNA and the efficacy of RNA interference (RNAi). (umassmed.edu)
  • initiation
  • We analyzed by X‐ray crystallography the structures of three different complexes of the small ribosomal subunit of Thermus thermophilus with the A‐site inhibitor tetracycline, the universal initiation inhibitor edeine and the C‐terminal domain of the translation initiation factor IF3. (embopress.org)
  • The location of the C‐terminal domain of IF3, at the solvent side of the platform, sheds light on the formation of the initiation complex, and implies that the anti‐association activity of IF3 is due to its influence on the conformational dynamics of the small ribosomal subunit. (embopress.org)
  • modification
  • One reason for alternative/differential splicing is base modification during RNA editing causing a change in splice sites. (tripod.com)
  • nucleotide
  • A mistake in even a single nucleotide can be devastating to the cell, and a reliable, repeatable method of RNA processing is necessary to ensure cell survival. (wikipedia.org)
  • complementary
  • Nucleobases provide the molecular structure necessary for the hydrogen bonding of complementary DNA and RNA strands, and are key components in the formation of stable. (absoluteastronomy.com)
  • cytoplasmic
  • This short-lived nuclear RNA ranged in lengths up to several tens of kilobases, much longer than most cytoplasmic mRNAs, and was referred to as heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) ( 3 , 4 ). (pnas.org)
  • viruses
  • Recent works have shown that viruses have evolved to manipulate many of these same RNA networks to support their own replications ( 5 , 6 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Not all RNA viruses are retroviruses, e.g., the measles virus and flu virus are RNA viruses, but not retroviruses. (hartford.edu)
  • mechanism
  • On the basis of these results we conclude that such extracellular small peptides compete with a specific factor which is part of the intracellular regulatory mechanism controlling the rate of RNA synthesis. (biologists.org)
  • cell
  • The function of histone modifying epigenetic regulators and noncoding RNA as central mediators of epithelial stem cell renewal and differentiation represent major emerging areas of study in the lab. (stanford.edu)
  • large
  • little-ω methods hedging forex risk T(x) ω(U(x)) means that for every constant c, T(x) cU(x) for all suffi- ciently large x. (retzepti.ru)