Loading...
  • salts
  • The free sulfonic acids and their salts with metals and nitrogenous bases do not show contact insecticidal and acaricidal properties, but some sulfonic acids of the triphenylmethane series and substituted arylureas are active mothproofing agents. (springer.com)
  • The salts of sulfanilic acid and related compounds have a fungicidal effect against rust of grains, but the mechanism of this action is still not entirely clear. (springer.com)
  • Such operations are conducted on a manufacturing scale in the preparation of the sodium salts of TPPTS (used in catalysts as described above), in the preparation of alkylated benzenesulfonic acids (used as synthetic detergents), and in the preparation of anthraquinonesulfonic acid (used in the manufacture of alizarin and other dyes). (britannica.com)
  • Taurine is conjugated via its amino terminal group with chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid to form the bile salts sodium taurochenodeoxycholate and sodium taurocholate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acids form aqueous solutions with a sour taste, can turn blue litmus red, and react with bases and certain metals (like calcium) to form salts. (wikipedia.org)
  • methyl
  • PolyAMPS, or poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid)® (Trademark of The Lubrizol Corporation), is an organic polymer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular Weight
  • Molecular Weight 303 Empirical Formula C7H11NO7S Synonyms 2 Naphthylamine 1-5 Disulfonic Acid Form Supplied Wet Powder Basis For Sale On Real Contant (M.W. 303) Strength Min. (exportersindia.com)
  • Chemical
  • Ethanesulfonic acid (esylic acid) is a sulfonic acid with the chemical formula CH3CH2SO3H. (wikipedia.org)
  • Selenenic acid Seleninic acid IUPAC, Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the "Gold Book") (1997). (wikipedia.org)
  • A Brønsted or Arrhenius acid usually contains a hydrogen atom bonded to a chemical structure that is still energetically favorable after loss of H+. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lewis considered this as a generalization of the Brønsted definition, so that an acid is a chemical species that accepts electron pairs either directly or by releasing protons (H+) into the solution, which then accept electron pairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • hydrogen
  • The parent compound (with the organic substituent replaced by hydrogen) is the hypothetical compound sulfurous acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, hydrogen fluoride, whether dissolved in water (pKa = 3.2) or DMSO (pKa = 15), has pKa values indicating that it undergoes incomplete dissociation in these solvents, making it a weak acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • An acid is a molecule or ion capable of donating a hydron (proton or hydrogen ion H+), or, alternatively, capable of forming a covalent bond with an electron pair (a Lewis acid). (wikipedia.org)
  • amines
  • Interestingly, although alcohols and amines can be Brønsted-Lowry acids, they can also function as Lewis bases due to the lone pairs of electrons on their oxygen and nitrogen atoms. (wikipedia.org)