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  • dementia
  • A new study has demonstrated how music therapy can provide significant benefits for people with dementia living in UK care homes. (anglia.ac.uk)
  • The group containing residents who took part in music therapy showed improvements in their dementia symptoms (measured using neuropsychiatric inventory scores) and wellbeing (measured using Dementia Care Mapping scores), as well as a decline in occupational disruptiveness to staff (the effect on the carer's work routine and emotional impact). (anglia.ac.uk)
  • Co-author Helen Odell-Miller, Professor of Music Therapy at Anglia Ruskin University, said: "Our study shows the sustained benefits of a music therapy programme on the symptoms of dementia, on the occupational disruptiveness of care home residents, and on levels of general wellbeing. (anglia.ac.uk)
  • Significantly, our findings show how staff education and training may be the most effective method in managing symptoms of dementia, and how music therapists can play a valuable role in this. (anglia.ac.uk)
  • Centre
  • The new open access research, published online by the journal BMC Geriatrics, took place in two Methodist Homes in Derby, and was carried out by academics from Anglia Ruskin University's Music for Health Research Centre. (anglia.ac.uk)
  • found
  • Similarly, in a review of "novel and emerging treatments" for ASD [ 8 ] including several nutritional supplements, diets, medications, and nonbiological treatments, it was found that the only treatment options that reached the highest ranking in an evidence-based grading system were melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, naltrexone, and music therapy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • autism
  • Family-centred music therapy to promote social engagement in young children with severe autism spectrum disorder: A randomized controlled study. (nordoff-robbins.org.uk)
  • Previous research has suggested that music therapy may facilitate skills in areas typically affected by autism spectrum disorders such as social interaction and communication. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The aim of this study is to determine effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills of children with autism spectrum disorders. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Generalised effects of music therapy will be measured using standardised scales completed by blinded assessors (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, ADOS) and parents (Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS) before and 2, 5, and 12 months after randomisation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Responding to the need for more rigorously designed trials examining the effectiveness of music therapy in autism spectrum disorders, this pragmatic trial sets out to generate findings that will be well generalisable to clinical practice. (biomedcentral.com)
  • affects
  • An additional aim of the study is to examine if variation in dose of treatment (i.e., number of music therapy sessions per week) affects outcome of therapy, and to determine cost-effectiveness. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Participants
  • Participants in the intervention group received 1:1 music therapy once a week, in addition to standard care, over a period of five months. (anglia.ac.uk)
  • children
  • In addition, children randomised to the two intervention groups will be offered individual, improvisational music therapy over a period of five months, either one session (low-intensity) or three sessions (high-intensity) per week. (biomedcentral.com)
  • symptoms
  • Considering that pharmacological treatments typically target symptoms such as hyperactivity, agitation, or sleep disorders rather than core symptoms of ASD, and may have adverse effects [ 2 , 8 ], music therapy can be viewed as a promising, but not yet sufficiently evidenced treatment for improving social interaction and communication skills within ASD. (biomedcentral.com)
  • social
  • for an overview, see [ 14 ]) suggesting that music therapy may enhance skills of social communication such as initiating and responding to communicative acts. (biomedcentral.com)