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  • cellular
  • EdU pulse-chase experiments and in vivo tracking of individual transgenic Piwi1 + stem cells showed that the cellular source for blastema formation is migration of stem cells from a remote area. (elifesciences.org)
  • BACKGROUND: Tenascin-C and fibronectin are adhesive glycoproteins modulating the structure of the extracellular matrix and cellular functions. (ki.se)
  • Beginning with the formation of a cellular aggregation (reportedly a blastema), these lizards are able to develop a replacement appendage that, at least superficially, resembles the original, complete with nerves, blood vessels and skeletal support. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These data reveal, in detail, the cellular and extracellular events that occur during newt spinal cord regeneration after a transection injury and uncover an important role for meningeal and glial cells in facilitating axon regeneration. (biomedcentral.com)
  • As well as the differentiation potential of blastema cells, their cellular origin is also controversial. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • cells
  • Our genetic fate mapping establishes the role of PAX7 + satellite cells for limb muscle regeneration. (pnas.org)
  • There they dedifferentiate - revert to a less specialized state similar to embryonic cells - and form the bud of a new limb, called a blastema. (baynature.org)
  • As the blastema cells multiply, they grow into the outline of a new limb and once again differentiate into fibroblasts, muscle, bone, etc. (baynature.org)
  • Our findings also identify satellite cells as potential targets in promoting mammalian blastema formation. (rupress.org)
  • These progenitor cells continue to divide and form a large pool of cells at the wound site, called a blastema, that will later specialize and mature to help form the bone, muscle, cartilage, nerves and skin of the regenerated limb. (medgadget.com)
  • When cells were implanted into contralateral proximal and distal hindlimb blastemas the proximal-to-distal ratio for activation of the reporter through the response element was approximately 3.5-fold, suggesting that a gene whose expression is regulated by RA could be differentially activated along the proximodistal axis during limb regeneration. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • A blastema is the boffinry term for the clump of special progenitor cells which appears at injury sites in creatures naturally able to regenerate themselves, such as newts or salamanders. (theregister.co.uk)
  • Fibroblast dedifferentiation is a crucial step for the formation of a regeneration blastema, a mass of undifferentiated proliferating cells responsible for the regeneration of complex structures such as limbs. (jcancer.org)
  • In amphibians this process is regulated by nerve fibres present at the site of injury, which have been proposed to release factors into the amputated limbs/fins, promoting and sustaining the proliferation of blastemal cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Do chick limb bud cells have positional information? (purdue.edu)
  • Supernumerary limb structures after juxtaposing dorsal and ventral chick wing bud cells. (purdue.edu)
  • Knocking down Piwi1 , Vasa , Pl10 or Ncol1 expressed by blastema cells inhibited regeneration but not blastema formation. (elifesciences.org)
  • However these factors were not upregulated during regeneration as would be expected if blastema cells acquired pluripotency. (biomedcentral.com)
  • By comparing cells from the regeneration blastema with embryonic pluripotent reference cells we found that induced pluripotent stem and blastema cells do not share pluripotency. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We therefore propose a link between partially reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells and the half way state of blastema cells and suggest that a common mechanism might be regulating these two processes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • After the loss of an appendage undifferentiated, pluri- or multipotent cells from different origins accumulate at the damaged surface to form a regeneration blastema. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Despite the heterogeneous origin of the blastema cells, histologically they appear as a homogeneous population of cells and therefore have been traditionally viewed as a single cell type. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Much less is known about the cells that are specialized to generate and regenerate the blueprint (the pattern-forming cells) in order to instruct the pattern-following cells as to how and where to rebuild the structures. (springer.com)
  • Recent studies provide evidence that the pattern-forming cells synthesize an information-rich extracellular matrix (ECM) that controls the behavior of pattern-following cells leading to the regeneration of limb structures. (springer.com)
  • We have found that pseudotyped Maloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MMLV) retroviruses can very efficiently infect axolotl cells in vitro and in vivo , and can be used for both lineage and functional analyses in regenerating limbs. (biologists.org)
  • The finding discredits a popular theory that holds that previously specialized cells regress, or dedifferentiate, in response to injury to form a pluripotent repair structure called a blastema. (blogspot.com)
  • In contrast, the blastema theory invokes a new pluripotent cell type formed out of urgency from previously specialized cells. (blogspot.com)
  • An additional aggregation of proliferating cells accumulates adjacent to the distal tip of the severed spinal cord marking the first appearance of the blastema. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 2. A cluster of cells competent to initiate the regeneration of a damaged or ablated structure. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • an undifferentiated mass of animal cells that later forms a structure or organ either embryologically or through regeneration, e.g. the head of a flatworm. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • According to this scenario, only a fraction of the blastema cells, possibly those resident in the distal region, might be multipotent cells. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Although we still do not know the extent of the reprogrammed status of blastema cells, Christen et al. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • regrow
  • Well, Ben, when Billy Shakespeare had those witches in Macbeth call for an "eye of newt, and toe of frog" to complete a very special hell-broth recipe, I'm not sure he knew those amphibians could actually regrow those body parts. (baynature.org)
  • The short synopsis of my reading of this article is simply that by activating a gene that goes back to early evolution, we may be able to regrow limbs like Sponges, worms, or Starfish. (thinkatheist.com)
  • But maybe 20 years from now, we'll be able to have people born with the ability to regrow limbs, and that's a win for science. (thinkatheist.com)
  • digits
  • Such injuries - the partial or complete loss of digits or limbs and deforming facial injuries - have profoundly affected the quality of life of the wounded as well as presented a new set of challenges for the medical community faced with treating them. (medgadget.com)
  • The proposed studies address one of the most pressing needs of the wounded soldier population: the replacement of lost digits and limbs. (pitt.edu)
  • regenerative
  • The research is particularly meaningful because some scientists and national media reports have championed the idea that money allotted by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine for stem cell studies would have been better funneled to blastema research, Weissman said. (blogspot.com)
  • genes
  • Can this remarkable ability be explained by genes shared by vertebrates, including humans, or by unique genes that the newt may have evolved? (phys.org)
  • In the study, the researchers constructed a database of all the protein-coding genes from the Japanese fire-bellied newt that had been reported in the Japan newt research community. (phys.org)
  • proliferation
  • Studying the hydrozoan Hydractinia echinata we show that a burst of stem cell proliferation occurs following decapitation, forming a blastema at the oral pole within 24 hr. (elifesciences.org)
  • regenerates
  • The regenerates that did form were strongly deviated (45-90°) radially from the longitudinal axis of the limb. (umich.edu)