Loading...
  • strontian
  • light metallic element, 1808, coined in Modern Latin by English chemist Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829) from Strontian , name of a parish in Argyllshire, Scotland, the site of lead mines where strontium was first found. (dictionary.com)
  • The production of sugar from sugar beet was in the 19th century the largest application of strontium (see strontian process). (wikipedia.org)
  • Gamma
  • Eu-doped strontium iodide single crystal growth has reached maturity and prototype SrI 2 (Eu)-based gamma ray spectrometers provide detection performance advantages over standard detectors. (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • Furthermore
  • 8,9 Furthermore, rubidium-strontium radioisotope dating of the granulite lenses immediately adjacent to these eclogites yields an 'age' closer to that of the untransformed granulite, 10,11 even though the temperatures supposedly required for formation of the eclogites should have obliterated that earlier 'age. (icr.org)
  • radiation
  • Different radioisotopes such as iodine and iridium facilitate highly specific radiation so that the patient receives a lower dose than that applied in 'traditional' external radiotherapy with X-rays. (sckcen.be)
  • The radiation can also be administered internally via an injection with radioisotopes or by taking medication orally. (sckcen.be)
  • Previous Radiation therapy to bone (including therapeutic radioisotopes such as strontium 89) within 3 months prior to Visit 2. (knowcancer.com)
  • On his Japanese language website, Busby marketed tests and a mineral supplement (dubbed by critics an "anti-radiation" pill) that he claimed could mitigate the effects of ingested radioisotopes. (wikipedia.org)
  • mineral
  • 15 An ultraviolet laser was used to measure profiles of argon-argon radioisotope 'ages' across individual mineral grains in the untransformed granulite lenses. (icr.org)
  • tumour
  • These include, among other factors, a 25% increase in pain severity, increased painkiller consumption, new pathological bone fractures, tumour related orthopaedic surgical intervention, and use of radioisotopes to relieve new skeletal related symptoms. (innovations-report.com)
  • applications
  • Strontium fluoride is used as an optical material for a small range of special applications, for example, as an optical coating on lenses and also as a thermoluminescent dosimeter crystal. (wikipedia.org)
  • core
  • The Chernobyl disaster released roughly 10 PBq, or about 5% of the core inventory, of strontium-90 into the environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • single
  • SET was criticised by Cox & Edwards (2000) who stated that if Busby's "biologically implausible" theory was correct and all irradiated cells undergo transformation to the G2 Phase, it would cause an increased risk factor of just 1.3 times and predict, on the contrary, substantial risk reduction at low doses for single emitting radioisotopes. (wikipedia.org)
  • light
  • Strontium fluoride is transparent to light in the wavelengths from vacuum ultraviolet (150 nm) to infrared (11 µm). (wikipedia.org)
  • Energy
  • Its excellent energy resolution, lack of intrinsic radioactivity or toxicity, and commercial availability make SrI2(Eu) the ideal scintillator for use in handheld radioisotope identification devices. (spiedigitallibrary.org)