• When British zoologist Reginald Innes Pocock revived Strepsirrhini and defined Haplorhini in 1918, he omitted the second "r" from both ("Strepsirhini" and "Haplorhini" instead of "Strepsirrhini" and "Haplorrhini"), although he did not remove the second "r" from Platyrrhini or Catarrhini, both of which were also named by É. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this system the names Prosimii and Anthropoidea would be replaced by Strepsirhini and Haplorhini, respectively. (umn.edu)
  • The pattern is present in Haplorhini, but absent in Strepsirhini. (springer.com)
  • Primates are divided into two groups, the Strepsirhini and the Haplorhini. (bartleby.com)
  • This term includes diseases of Haplorhini and Strepsirhini. (umassmed.edu)
  • Two taxonomic arrangements are generally used today--one based on the traditional division between Prosimii and Anthropoidea, and a more recent one that divides groups into the Strepsirhini and Haplorhini. (wwnorton.com)
  • The Order Primates is divided into two Suborders: Strepsirhini, the lemurs and lorises, and the Haplorhini, the monkeys and apes. (blogspot.com)
  • 1988. Systematics of the Lemuridae (Primates, Strepsirhini). (tolweb.org)
  • Lemurs belong to the sub-order Strepsirhini together with bushbabies, lorises, and pottos which-like the original lemurs-are nocturnal, insectivorous primates characterized by a small body, a long nose, and large eyes. (wildmadagascar.org)
  • A family of the order PRIMATES, suborder Strepsirhini (PROSIMII), containing four genera which inhabit Madagascar and the Comoro Island. (bireme.br)
  • Describe a variety of different species from the suborder Strepsirhini. (edu.au)
  • More recent specimens are Teilhardina , a well-known, early Eocene (56-47 Ma) marmoset-like primate from Europe, North America and Asia, and Darwinius masillae , a species within the adapoidea , a 47 Ma basal strepsirhini from the middle Eocene , representative of the early haplorrhini diversification. (human-evolution.blog)
  • Cuvier identified five major massive extinction events that decimated the number of living species ( Fig. 1 ), of which the fifth (the K/T, Cretaceous-Tertiary, transition) was caused by the impact of an asteroid in the Yucatan peninsula (65 Ma) causing the Chicxulub crater, a 180 km-diameter ring ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicxulub_crater ). (human-evolution.blog)